You Asked: Will Fasting Jump-Start My Weight-Loss Efforts and Boost My Health?

By , SparkPeople Blogger
Fasting has long been touted as a healthy process with many benefits such as cleaning the system, ridding the body of so-called toxins, benefiting the intestinal track, boosting metabolism, and jumpstarting weight loss. However none of these notions is true, nor is any of them backed up by medical research.
While a short-term fast probably won’t harm most people, it could be quite dangerous for others, depending on their medical conditions, health histories, and medication use. I strongly urge you to talk to your physician before ever starting or considering a fast.
During normal metabolic conditions (non-fasting), the body gets its energy primarily from glucose and fat (in the blood), which are supplied by the carbohydrates and fats that you eat. Both the brain and nervous systems use blood glucose for energy and proper functioning. Your body also stores energy in both the muscles and liver in the form of glycogen.
Within only hours after starting a fast, when dietary glucose is used up, the body draws on its glycogen stores, but these don’t last very long. When these stores are exhausted, your body enters an altered metabolic state. It turns to its own protein (and a portion of its fat) to make more glucose for the brain and nervous system. This results in a considerable breakdown of both lean muscle tissue and fat tissue, and a production of ketones. This is not considered a healthy or desirable state.
As a result, you might lose weight, but it is due to water loss, dehydration, and muscle tissue wasting, and is usually accompanied with symptoms such as fatigue and dizziness.
Therefore, you can reason that after years of abusing the body with a poor diet and excessive fat and calories, a fasting state is not the answer to better health. Your body is truly craving proper nutrition, including whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy products, healthy fats, and lean meats, fish, beans, and other protein sources. Then and only then, can the body systems work together effectively and efficiently. This healthy diet will results in improved energy and overall health.
NOTE: Certain medical procedures and tests require patients to fast for a designated time period. Always follow the advice of your primary health care provider in these situations.
Additional Reading:
Detox Diets: Helpful or Full of Hype?
Do Detox Diets Work? Are They Safe?

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ALOFA0509 1/22/2018
Soo much outdated info!!! From the Success stories, to these old articles from 2012???? Lots of Research on benefits of Fasting... Report
ELYSUMMERS1 1/22/2018
I can't believe how old some of these comments are, and the age of the article, and yet SP continues to bring it to the top of the feed. MANY religions routinely fast. Fasting for short terms has been proven to be beneficial with many peer reviewed articles. Time for SP to take this out of date information down. Report
OKOBOJII 1/22/2018
Wow, lots of nasty comments on here. The unnecessary nastiness is another reason not to join the keto community.

Before you bust out your nasty grams, kids look at the date on the article. If it's from 2012, maybe you should just ignore it or, if you feel it would be more helpful, contact Sparkpeople and ask them to reconsider the post? They may be able to take it down. Report
CTYONIT 1/22/2018
This article is NOT based on current research. The human body can use either glucose or fat for it's energy needs. It burns the glucose first because it is a poison in your body. Get rid of the poison (sugars/highly refined carbohydrates) and the body will burn fat. Research has proven that lean muscle tissue is not burned. Do your research--the truth is out there. Report
PAMBRADLEY 1/21/2018
I have to disagree with this article, I believe the new science about intermittent fasting is of great benefit to the human state. I emphasize "Intermittent" not starving yourself for long periods. I am on the "fast diet" by Michael Mosley and honestly there is a change in how my body functions and my cravings for sugary foods. Two days per week of restricting calories to 500-800 per day is not hard just different. You will not lose lean body muscle in that time and it does wonders for your gut biome. I think it's time to refresh the ideas on this topic. Report
LRJUSTUS1 1/13/2018
If you don't know enough about a topic to write a reasonable, factual's okay not to write the article. Really, it's okay not to write it.
Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt. Report
I am highly disappointed, though not surprised, at Spark's publishing this outdated article. Shame on you for doing so and perpetuating old-thinking information without proper research on current SCIENCE. Report
GKNIGHT69 11/13/2017
Thank you!!! Report
LOVELY*LADY 7/13/2017
:) Report
VICKIEL1970 6/27/2017
What is hilarious about this article is that the SAME exact "expert" that wrote this article back in 2012 wrote another article about last year, about intermittent fasting that completely contradicts this article.... Guess she used to work for the USDA... cause that's who we got our erroneous dietary "food pyramid" from decades ago, and why most of us are having to lose weight today.... Report
Wow! I am very surprised at the level of ignorance here. Please, please, please do actual research about fasting and ketosis. Report
This article is way out of date and just wrong. This is not how metabolism works the body burns ketones when glycogen is depleted. It's very healthy as proven by good recent studies and intermittent fasting is spreading rapidly because of its success. I fast frequently and have lost 41 pounds in six months. I'm alert, healthy and in better shape than I've been in years. Spark ... you need to get this writer off the site. This is plain misinformation. Report
Another crappy article and misinformation from Becky Hand Report
Sparkpeople credibility: Lost.
Just because this website makes a point not to advocate fasting, even intermittent fasting, doesn't mean it's bad. Instead of getting your information from Sparkpeople, who do have a vested interest in what "method" you lose weight, do your own research.
I don't have time to do it for you. Here's a few key areas for intermittent fasting research you might be interested in: weight loss, improved glucose sensitivity, IT prior to chemotherapy, etc.
Go to your local library, get on EBSCOHost (or WorldCat), and do your own research.
Or read another non-research article that says this article is wrong. There's plenty of them out there. Seek, and ye shall find.
(I tried including links, but the system won't let me comment if I do.)

PS- To Ms. Becky Hand, please learn the difference between when to use "is" and "are." I'm pretty sure English is your first language, and if you're going to be a blogger, improve your proofreading or have someone competent do it for you. And try writing about information you have researched, instead of just spewing badly-written propaganda. Report
I'm happy with the steady weight loss that comes from a healthy diet and regular exercise myself. I don't need to do this in a hurry. Report
Ketosis as such is NOT a bad thing. It's ketoacidosis which is the problem, though many people, including medical professionals get them confused. There a lot of good information on this at Mark's Daily Apple.

And from an article in the Journal of the International Society for Sports Nutrition, found at BioMed Central:
"During very low carbohydrate intake, the regulated and controlled production of ketone bodies causes a harmless physiological state known as dietary ketosis. Ketone bodies flow from the liver to extra-hepatic tissues (e.g., brain) for use as a fuel; this spares glucose metabolism via a mechanism similar to the sparing of glucose by oxidation of fatty acids as an alternative fuel. In comparison with glucose, the ketone bodies are actually a very good respiratory fuel. Indeed, there is no clear requirement for dietary carbohydrates for human adults."

there're some interesting studies lately showing that 'intermittent fasting' can be very helpful and healthy. this would involve 2 non-consecutive days each week where you restrict yourself to 500 calories, and eat normally (not overeating to make up for the restrictions) the other days. it seems to help cholesterol, blood sugar, and other health issues. I'll be interested to see what more studies will show. Report
as soon as we stop eating aren't we basically starting a fast? And then while we sleep are fasting.
And it is better not to eat right before going to bed so your body and use it's energy to restore your body than digest food.

So how long is to long to fast in an average day? Report
I do a water fast after cheat days, with little to no exercise. It helps me shed the weight gained from my cheat meals and jump-starts my week. Report
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