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The Hidden Exercise Risk No One Talks About

By , Dana Gore, Certified Personal Trainer
I thought I knew a thing or two about diet and exercise. For example, I knew how to do a squat, and that avoiding carbs altogether wasn’t necessarily a wise thing to do.

Then I enrolled in personal training school and realized just how much I didn’t know.
To be perfectly honest, I had never really given any thought to the subject of exercise safety – and it took getting a formal education to bring it to my awareness.

When you want to lose weight and get in shape, you focus on the important things: what foods to eat, which fitness program to follow and how to balance your calories in vs. calories out. Of course these factors are normal and helpful, but when it comes to exercise—an activity designed to bring you optimal health and well-being—there are hidden dangers lurking beneath the surface if you aren't paying attention.

One of those hidden dangers is the act of chewing gum during exercise.

When you work out, you breathe harder, heavier and faster than normal—and often through the mouth.  If you are engaging in high-intensity exercises, as many of the popular weight-loss programs have been promoting within the last couple of years, then there is a pretty good chance that you are breathing quite heavily during your workout.

Now imagine that you are exercising with a piece of gum in your mouth and suddenly, without warning, it gets lodged in your throat and you begin to choke.

Would you be able to do something about this? If you were alone, the chances are pretty slim. If you were at a fitness facility, you would have to depend on the gym staff to know how to administer the appropriate protocol to try to save your life.
I know it isn’t a pleasant thought, and I’m not trying to scare you.

But since many of the gyms out there don’t necessarily require their staff to know the lifesaving techniques required to remove this foreign object that is blocking your airway, you may or may not survive the incident.

And if you were lucky enough to have someone around who knew how to perform the abdominal thrusts in an effort to remove the objects that people normally choke on (such as food or candy), it’s important to understand that choking on gum is an entirely different situation.

Since gum is flexible in texture, it tends to mold itself to fit perfectly in the airway once it gets stuck. This means that not only is it more challenging to expel gum even if the correct technique is applied by a qualified rescuer, but that there really are no guarantees that it will work.

And the longer the gum remains stuck in the airway, the longer the brain is deprived of oxygen, the effects of which can range from mild to severe. So if you do happen to survive the incident, you may or may not have lasting consequences to deal with, such as brain damage, reduced cognitive abilities or memory and problems with attention span. This is a risk you can easily avoid.

The truth is: If someone is capable of choking on his or her food while calmly sitting and dining (and this happens frequently), then it’s definitely possible that it can happen during exercise. I cannot tell you how often this habit is overlooked, which is why I am bringing it to your attention.

I certainly didn’t know, and would have remained unaware if it hadn’t been intentionally brought up one evening in class. In fact, during this particular lecture on the dangers of chewing gum while exercising, Dr. Abbott (the president and chief instructor of the school) informed us that while discussing this topic in the past, three of his students admitted to having witnessed someone choke on their gum while working out in the gym--and all three died.

If you happen to like having something around to help cope with the effects of a dry mouth that exercise sometimes causes, then a helpful suggestion is to keep some cold and refreshing lemon water around while you work out, and then enjoy your gum after your workout once your breathing has returned to normal.

Considering that this isn’t a common topic of discussion, I felt it was my responsibility to make sure that others had access to this lifesaving advice as well.
So given that healthy-living is the overall goal, doesn’t it make sense to be well informed about the possible hidden risks of your fitness program? I think so.  The knowledge that makes it possible to make wise, informed and deliberate decisions in an effort to live our best lives is a precious gift.

Are you guilty of chewing gum during your workouts? Have you ever had a close call because of it?

About The Author
Creator of IChooseAwareness.com and author of the book "A Simple Guide to Exercise Safety: What You Don't Know CAN Hurt You," Dana Gore completed the curriculum at Fitness Institute International, Inc. as an outstanding graduate in 2009.

Dana brings guidance to the public about how to achieve optimal health in a safe and structured manner. She believes that the body follows the guidance and instruction of the mind and spirit while inspiring her readers to seek self-awareness and inner peace as a means to well-being in all areas of life.



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Comments

JUDY1676 3/10/2021
Thanks Report
CHERYLHURT 2/11/2021
We don’t chew gum! Report
KATRENIAH 2/5/2021
This never occurred to me, although now that you've mentioned it, it feels like it should've been obvious. Thanks for bringing it to our attention. Report
LISASOWELL 1/9/2021
I eat gum often during my workout thank you that's a habit I will immediately give up Report
LISASOWELL 1/9/2021
I eat gum often during my workout thank you that's a habit I will immediately give up Report
LISASOWELL 1/9/2021
Thank you so much for sharing I never heard this before and I eat u Report
ROBBIEY 1/9/2021
great to know info. I use to always have gum in my mouth and now I do not use it while working out Report
ROBBIEY 1/9/2021
great to know info. I use to always have gum in my mouth and now I do not use it while working out Report
NANHBH 1/9/2021
Who knew? Report
CECELW 1/9/2021
thats a really good reminder Report
REDROBIN47 1/9/2021
Thanks for the good reminder. I have heard this before but, to be truthful, haven't given it a though lately. Report
YVONNE325 1/9/2021
Will stop chewing while walking on threadmill but it help Report
SUNNYCALIGIRL 1/9/2021
Wow. I gave up gum a long time ago--it sticks to your teeth and it deforms tooth growth in children, as well as causing air to get sucked into the stomach--creating flatulence. Sometimes just drinking water while I exercise seems dangerous enough, causing me to sputter and cough as it goes down the wrong way. Drinking fluids during exercise has to be managed appropriately as well. Report
MJ7DM33 1/9/2021
Thanks! I will share this! Report
RCLYKE 1/9/2021
Thanks Report
AZMOMXTWO 1/9/2021
thank you Report
CECTARR 1/9/2021
Thanks Report
RAPUNZEL53 1/9/2021
Great Report
JANIMOEN 1/9/2021
Interesting, not something I’ve ever thought of. Report
NEPTUNE1939 1/9/2021
ty Report
FERRETLOVER1 1/9/2021
I don't chew gum anymore. Report
NASFKAB 1/9/2021
Do not chew gum but now I know to stop others doing so while exercising Report
CORVETTECOWBOY 1/9/2021
Thanks Report
JANIEWWJD 1/9/2021
Awesome article!!!! Report
_CYNDY55_ 1/8/2021
Thanks Report
KATHYJO56 12/28/2020
Good article-it is all common sense Report
NIOMIW 8/15/2020
Thank you! I'm sure there are more safety issues that don't seem obvious that we should know. Report
GRALAN 8/12/2020
As an instructor of First Aid and CPR for healthcare providers to medical staff to bus drivers and babysitters, I can say that I'm glad to read your article here and I wish more folks practiced "safe" exercising. There are too many things people do by rote, without thinking about it; including driving, chopping vegetables, listening to music loudly as they drive, run or walk, etc.
It is surprising more folks don't die from stupid things. It is sad that there are folks who continue to do so. Report
SALTYCHOCOLATE 7/28/2020
I really can't even imagine chewing gum while working out. Report
SUSANBEAMON 7/28/2020
My dad never let us chew gum when I was young, so I didn't develop the habit. Report
ILOVEROSES 7/26/2020
I never chew gum. It's a great article. Report
WILDKAT781 7/25/2020
don't chew gum anyway, but good tip Report
JAMER123 7/24/2020
Good article on safety for each individual. Report
ACIMPEGGY 7/24/2020
Wow! Never thought of it. And I sometimes chew gum on my elliptical exercise bike alone in my apartment.

Thanks!! Report
SHOAPIE 7/24/2020
Rarely chew gum, but if I did while exercising, I’m sure I’d bite my tongue! Report
JANTHEBLONDE 7/24/2020
Great article! Report
PRUSSIANETTE 7/24/2020
Nice to know. Now, since my gym has indicated they will not be opening again until 2021 due to the pandemic, I guess I will not chew gum while exercising to my workout DVDs. :) Report
DAWNGW 7/24/2020
something I've never done... I think that having gum in my mouth while working out would annoy me. I never gave it any thought; glad that it's opening some people's eyes who do chew gum during workouts. Report
1CRAZYDOG 7/24/2020
Never would have thought of chewing gum while workin out. Thanks for the warning. Common sense, really. Report
TRISH8456 7/24/2020
Common sense don't you think???
Report
JILLIAN0216 7/24/2020
Good advice. I never would think to chew gum while exercising. Report
4CONNIESHEALTH 7/24/2020
I would have never thought about chewing gum while working out. Great information for those who might do this though. Report
AQUAGIRL08 7/24/2020
I never chew gum when I exercise. Thank you for the reminder! Report
NELLJONES 7/24/2020
I never thought about this before. Report
PLCHAPPELL 7/24/2020
Not guilty Report
RACHAEL2020 7/24/2020
After reading the comments, there are pros and cons of chewing gum during exercise. This is something to ponder on. Report
KITTYHAWK1949 7/24/2020
interesting but I am not a gum chewer so not likely to happen to me Report
PATRICIAAK 7/23/2020
:) Report
WILDKAT781 7/12/2020
excellent point Report
NEKO2019 7/10/2020
I have Sjorgren's Syndrome (along w/ RA) and a swallowing disorder. There are products that are supposed to help but they are not all that effective. Yes, gum and hard candies are things that can help a bit but also can be dangerous during activity. I suspect most people take the ability to swallow for granted. Report