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Health & Wellness Articles  ›  Surviving Seasonal Allergies

Exercising with Seasonal Allergies

Don't Let Allergens Interfere with Your Workouts

-- By Nicole Nichols, Fitness Instructor & Health Educator
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For some people, exercise itself is an uncomfortable activity, with all the sweating, huffing and puffing, and challenge that comes with elevating your heart rate for an extended period of time. But for people with seasonal allergies, the discomforts of exercise reach a whole new level. Your eyes are itchy and watery, your nose is stuffed up or runny, and breathing can become difficult. But that doesn't mean that you should give up on your plans to make regular exercise a part of your healthy lifestyle. In general, people with allergies can and should exercise (as long as their health care provider says it's okay). The following tips will help you make the most of your workouts and keep your allergy symptoms at bay.

Before Your Workout
  • Always talk to your doctor before starting an exercise program.
  • If you are a beginner to fitness, exercise indoors for a few weeks before you move your workout sessions outside. This will help you build up your fitness level without worrying about allergy symptoms on top of the challenges of starting an exercise program.
  • Take your allergy medication on a regular basis to remain protected. At the very least, take your medication and/or use eye drops at least one hour (or 24 hours, if using a nasal spray) prior to exercising.
  • If you receive allergy shots, do not exercise strenuously for at least one or two hours after your injection. Vigorous exercise, which increases heart rate and blood flow, can lead to a rapid absorption of the shot, increasing your chances of serious side effects.
  • Watch the weather. Changes in weather (temperature, wind, humidity and precipitation) all affect pollen counts. Warm, dry, and breezy days—especially in the morning—tend to increase pollen counts (avoid outdoor exercise during these conditions), while rainy, cooler days and evenings will reduce pollen concentration.
  • If you're feeling under the weather, avoid outdoor exercise. Your immune system is more likely to react severely to allergens when you're tired, sick, or overly stressed.
  • Before heading outside, listen to the radio to check pollen/mold counts or log onto a pollen count website. Adjust your workout plan accordingly, based on the counts and your level of sensitivity. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, "low" pollen counts will only affect individuals who are extremely sensitive to pollen and mold; "moderate" pollen counts will give many individuals symptoms; and "high" pollen counts affect almost everyone with any sensitivity to pollen and molds.
  • Spend at least five minutes warming up before you start each workout. Continued ›
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About The Author

Nicole Nichols Nicole Nichols
Nicole was named "America's Top Personal Trainer to Watch" in 2011. A certified personal trainer and fitness instructor with a bachelor's degree in health education, she loves living a healthy and fit lifestyle and helping others do the same. Her DVDs "Total Body Sculpting" and "28 Day Boot Camp" (a best seller) are available online and in stores nationwide. Read Nicole's full bio and blog posts.

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Member Comments

  • HOLLYLEICHAVEZ
    One thing that helps me is having a heavy-duty hepa filter in the room all the time, exercise or not. I have itchy, watery eyes in the springtime and all kinds of congestion. A mask helps, otherwise I can't do it. I feel ridiculous when I wear it, though. - 3/30/2014 11:52:00 AM
  • As a nurse I just want to say yuck to wearing a mask while exercising. They are miserable enough at work. I don't want to try catching my breath with a mask that barely breathes. - 3/16/2014 6:29:31 PM
  • NJ_HOU
    I really liked the idea of chaing your clothes . I used to do that from the stuff that you can get on a plane. In fact, I use a neti pot to flush my nasal pkgs and have for years. I used to be a traveling consultant and the planes !!!! whatever they call it was a real mess. after learning to arrive in time to go to hotel, put travel clothes in a bag in the closet or near the door, wash my sinuses with a neti pot , take a shower , and then neti pot again. I found I rarely caught anything from the plane whatever. So why was it such a surprise to view the walk around the neighborhood as a simialr assault!! great info - 2/9/2010 2:23:32 PM
  • FLUBBERS
    I currently have a sinus infection, and maybe strep throat, and nasal allergies. But last night I walked my dog, and I felt great after! But I did make sure to take my medicine, we also took a break.
    I never thought about changing clothes when coming back in though. I will have to try that tonight and see if there is a difference. - 2/26/2009 11:09:08 AM
  • THEJOKESONME
    i actuall found that i feel much better when i exersize its really hard to start and i sometimes get a panic attack and really have to psyc myself but once i get going i really feel much better its a bit like mind over matter i haqve been struggling as the bush fires have been close to me and the smoke has really hit me bad but i really try to stay positive and i know at times it is very hard to stay positive - 2/19/2009 1:56:29 AM
  • THEJOKESONME
    i use a syringe without a needle some salt with luke warm water and vigorsly flush out all the mucus and clear my airways its easy to do and it has helped me a lot - 2/19/2009 1:49:20 AM
  • Having outdoor and indoor allergies plus Reactive Airway Disease really makes exercising hard in the fall...even yoga sounds too tough on days like today. - 10/11/2008 10:17:57 AM
  • Great article! I'd actually not had any allergy problems for well over 10 years, but the past couple of weeks have been BRUTAL for some reason. If you have sinus trouble, I highly recommend a Neti Pot. It's a tiny thing like a tea pot that you use to rinse out your sinuses, kinda like the saline spray but more direct. It sounds strange, but it's really easy to use and makes a huge difference. I can really tell that getting the pollen out of there before it can cause a worse reaction keeps it from hitting me so hard. It's also a life-saver during the dry air times in the winter or in a hotel!

    Peace. - 6/2/2008 4:25:15 PM
  • Great article. I made sure to nurse my babies to help prevent them from getting allergies, as I know it is a problem for many people. - 3/31/2008 3:02:56 AM
  • I found the information on this page very helpful. I have alergies and the tree pollen is the worst for me. Thank you. - 3/15/2008 3:19:28 PM