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Motivation Articles  ›  Staying Motivated

Mastering the Mysteries of Motivation - Part 2

Building & Maintaining Motivation

-- By Dean Anderson, Behavioral Psychology Expert
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Do you often find yourself wondering where your motivation went? Do you suddenly revert back to your “old ways” without really understanding why?

If this sounds familiar, you may have some basic misconceptions about motivation: what it is, where it comes from, and what you can do to hang on to it. Well get ready to understand all those things and learn what it takes to become your own best motivator!

Part 1 in this series explained what motivation really is—taking responsibility for conscious actions—and how to prevent it from waning. This article will help you build up that much needed motivation and keep it for the long haul.

To become your own best motivator, you must consistently do two things:

1. Consciously choose to eat well and exercise as often as you can. This isn’t something you do once or at the beginning of your diet. It is something you have to do multiple times each day, whenever you are thinking about eating or figuring out what to do with your time. It is a matter of trying to be mindful about what you are doing, instead of mindlessly reacting to your emotions, your circumstances, or your habits and natural predispositions. This can be as simple as taking a second to ask yourself, "Is this what I want to do?"

2. When you do something different than what you think you should do, understand that this was also your choice. This is where things can get a little tricky. Your natural inclination may be to figure out why this happened or, even worse, what’s wrong with you that “makes” you do what you don’t want to do. This is just the opposite of what you need to do. Simply accept the decision you made as a valid decision made by you. It doesn’t matter whether it was right or wrong. Just think of it as a valid decision made under less than ideal circumstances. This will free you to look at the situation as a powerful and capable person. This way, you have the ability to modify the circumstances (in large or small ways), making it easier to make decisions in line with your intentions next time around. And that is the whole point.

Change Your Story, Change Your Results
Motivation is not something you find or lose, have or don't have. It is the product of how you see yourself in the world: active or passive, effective or ineffective, powerful or victimized, normal or pathological. If you want to be able to motivate yourself, you need to begin seeing yourself as active, effective, powerful, and normal.
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About The Author

Dean Anderson Dean Anderson
Dean Anderson has master's degrees in human services (behavioral psychology/stress management) and liberal studies. His interest in healthy living began at the age of 50 when he confronted his own morbid obesity and health issues. He joined SparkPeople and lost 150 pounds and regained his health. Dean has earned a personal training certification from ACE and received training as a lifestyle and weight management consultant. See all of Dean's articles.

Member Comments

  • These are very meaningful articles for me.
    I really appreciate the quality and accuracy of the information found in SP articles. - 1/23/2014 9:49:05 PM
  • These two articles are exactly what I needed right now. Thank you! AJ - 1/16/2014 8:08:37 AM
  • Thanks for sharing this article, It helped me a lot. - 10/27/2013 2:52:03 PM
  • I tried to save it but it wouldn't let me. Great article. - 8/16/2013 6:33:20 PM
  • "History is not Destiny"

    This was liberating phrase for me to read today, because it goes further than just weight loss. It's going to help me change how I see myself.

    Thank you for this article. - 7/26/2013 12:27:26 AM
  • OK- This article really spoke to me, uh, except maybe the part about having to consider
    yourself "NORMAL". not, and I like that - what is normal after all? Conforming???
    WON'T DO IT! But I will continue to spread the SPARK and love this community! - 3/16/2013 4:13:47 PM
  • just what I needed! it's official. I have now set an ongoing event in my calendar to read one motivational article every night at eight. This is the time I start to feel, who knows what, but it inevitably ends with my eating all the wrong things. Well, no more! I am proud that I have lost twenty pounds. instead of beating myself up for not being able to loose the last fifteen, I'm going to congratulate myself for having kept it off for three years! I will get there! Not beating myself up is good for starters! - 3/6/2013 9:32:53 PM
  • "Change Your Story, Change Your Results
    Motivation is not something you find or lose, have or don't have. It is the product of how you see yourself in the world: active or passive, effective or ineffective, powerful or victimized, normal or pathological. If you want to be able to motivate yourself, you need to begin seeing yourself as active, effective, powerful, and normal."

    I think these are perhaps the most important words in both Motivation articles. *Change your personal story*! - 11/26/2012 1:48:09 PM
  • I don't want to be normal. I want to be exceptional! Does that put me in the perfectionist category? I don't think so because, in my book, even exceptional people occationally stray from the ideal path, but then we get back! - 8/30/2012 2:40:33 PM
  • You are, my friend, a genius! You have so perfectly nailed down not only the definition of motivation, but also the process of self talk and the source of feelings of powerlessness. I was vicitimized and bullied as a child, suffered severe depression several times in my life, and am now fighting habits that are affecting my weight and health. You have peeled my emotional onion, so to speak, with your words. THANK YOU! - 3/29/2012 10:40:01 AM
  • Thanks for the motivation articles. I can now see some of the mistakes I made in the past really were linked to my stories I was telling myself. Lets call them lies! I believe now, I can conciously catch myself doing this self abuse thing after reading the articles. GREAT information. - 2/6/2012 10:12:05 PM
  • I think I'm in love with Coach Dean! He hits the nail on the head every time! THANK YOU! - 12/9/2011 11:39:58 AM
  • This is the perfect article for me... probably (at least for right now) the best I have read yet! Some of my friends went through empty nest syndrome when their kids left home. I wish that is all it was with me. I went through some really "BAD" family issues which devastated me emotionally and here I am! Still hanging on to pieces of those issues. I really need to let go of them and get on with living my life! I WANT to let go of them and get on with living my life. I have that burst of energy in starting something new and get all excited about what I plan to accomplish and then I let life get in the way EVERY SINGLE TIME! I don't value myself enough to say no to those issues and that is going to change. I have always said I am a VICTOR not a VICTIM... but in this case I am still the victim and enough is enough! - 7/7/2011 12:34:56 PM
  • Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! Now I have a clue, I am telling the story over and over again and is a story I wish it did not happen, so enough of it. Now is time to accept it happened, and change the story into a victory in my journey!!!! Again, thank you, thank you, thank you!!! - 6/26/2011 6:32:12 PM
  • OMG! I believe this is my first time ever gathering enough nerve to leave a comment, but after reading these two article I felt compelled. I just would like to say THANK YOU for taking the time to encourage and inspire and that I am grateful. As I was reading I felt many emotions, as I mentally traveled through my own journey. This is by far the BEST article I have read not only on Spark but anywhere (online, magazines, etc.). So I again say Thank you and continue to inspire and encourage! - 6/1/2011 5:06:55 PM