Fitness Articles

How to Choose a Personal Trainer

Things to Consider Before Making the Investment

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Personal trainers can help people reach their health and fitness goals, or they could be big wastes of money. It's tough to know whether or not you need a trainer's expertise. And if you do, it's even more difficult to pick the right one. Many gyms offer personal training services for their members (at additional fees that can be pretty expensive), and their high-pressure salespeople might try to convince you to buy a package. But before you sign on the dotted line, it's important that you're making the right decision with the right person to help you reach your goals.

Personal trainers are not just for the rich and famous. If you lack the motivation to workout on your own, like variety but don't know how to create your own program, or you have very specific training goals, you might benefit from hiring a trainer. If you're still unsure, take our Do You Need a Personal Trainer? quiz.

If you decide that you need a trainer, how do you get started? Here's a guide that takes you through the process.

Where Do I Find a Trainer?
There are a number of different ways to find a trainer. The most common is through your local gym or fitness center. These facilities typically offer personal training packages for an additional cost (on top of membership fees). The gym you belong to may also allow you to bring in an outside trainer (not affiliated with the gym), but this is the exception to the rule as most gyms have exclusivity contracts with the trainers who work at their location. If you don't belong to a fitness center, you still might be able to train at one. Not every gym will require you to be a member to use their personal training services (although the cost might be higher for non-members). Contact the facility to learn more about their policies.

Word-of-mouth is also a good way to find a trainer, since it helps to get feedback from someone who has already used the trainer's services. Just keep in mind that what works for one person doesn't always work for another. For example, your friend might respond well to their trainer's "tough love" approach, but that might not be for you.

You can also find trainers in your local paper, yellow pages or online. Some trainers will come to your home. If you have your own workout equipment, this could be a convenient and timesaving way to use their services. (As a safety precaution, be sure to conduct a thorough background check on any person you might invite into your home for a private session.)
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About The Author

Jen Mueller Jen Mueller
Jen received her master's degree in health promotion and education from the University of Cincinnati. A mom and avid marathon runner, she is an ACE-certified personal trainer, health coach, medical exercise specialist and behavior change specialist. See all of Jen's articles.

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