Fitness Articles

Plateau Busters - Part 1

Eat the Right Nutrients at the Right Times

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We hear it all the time—you changed your habits and lost weight steadily, but after awhile, that progress halted. You’ve been stuck at the same weight for days, weeks, or even months. There’s nothing more frustrating than trying your best, feeling like you are doing everything right, yet not making any progress towards your weight loss or fitness goals.
 
Before you inhale a bag of cookies to console yourself, realize that weight loss takes work, and isn’t always perfect. But, there are plenty of ways you can re-energize your program (and motivation) to bust through your weight loss plateau. 
 
But…what is a plateau anyway?
If you’ve been exercising and cutting calories for several weeks, and you’re no longer seeing the same results that you experienced in the beginning, then you’ve probably hit a plateau. This occurs when your progress comes to a standstill, and can be described as not making any “gains” (such as improving your fitness level or losing weight), but not necessarily moving backwards (losing endurance or gaining weight).
 
Because every individual is unique, there’s no way to actually predict when a plateau might happen. However, the following principles of nutrition, rest, and variation will jumpstart your body, mind, and metabolism. (This article, part 1 in a series of 3, will focus on nutrition.) Incorporate some or all of the following suggestions to both prevent and overcome a weight loss plateau. With just a little tweaking, you’ll be in your skinny jeans in no time!
 
Eat the Right Nutrients at the Right Times

1.  Make sure you are following your SparkPeople nutrition plan correctly. During set-up, did you accurately account for your level of activity? Or, if you are more or less active than when you started the program, have you changed this option in your set-up so that your caloric plan will be accurate for you? This is very important so that you don’t eat too little for your body’s needs, which can actually hinder your weight loss.

In addition, are you accurately tracking your foods in the Food Tracker daily, yet not reaching the minimum number of calories that is recommended? It’s common to think that cutting MORE calories will result in faster weight loss, but that’s not actually the case.  You should never consume less than 1200 calories per day. Eating less than this (or too little in general) makes your body think it’s starving (known as “starvation mode”), so it holds onto every calorie, slowing your metabolism. Increase your calories to fit into your recommended range, and you’ll notice a difference.
 
2.  Your body can only do so much with the tools that it has, so eat well.    Aim for a wide variety of foods (instead of the same old thing day in and day out) from every basic food group.   Try new fruits and vegetables, ethnic cuisines, and a wide range of lean proteins, including non-meat sources like tofu and legumes. All (or most) of your grains should come from whole, unrefined foods like whole-wheat breads and pasta, and brown rice.

These healthy foods, especially when eaten every three to four hours, will help raise and stabilize your metabolism (and energy) to optimal levels. With fewer ups and downs, your hunger will stay in check, and you’ll have plenty of energy to finish a tough workout.
 

3.  After a workout, refuel with a balanced snack or meal within 30 minutes to 2 hours. Remember, “balanced” does not mean just protein. In fact, most individuals—and even athletes—need less than 10 grams of protein post-workout. Carbohydrates are actually more important, so try to eat an additional 30 to 60 grams at this time, when your body is primed to uptake glycogen into the cells to replace the energy you just used up during your workout. 
 
4.  Don’t overlook your huge need for water. Hydration is very important for stable energy levels.  (You store 3 molecules of water for every glycogen molecule). Plus, hydration promotes muscle building (powering your metabolism), while dehydration promotes muscle breakdown. So drink up—before, during, and after your workout sessions. The standard “8 cups a day” might not be enough for you, especially if you are exercising regularly.


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Member Comments

  • It takes a good combo of nutrition send exercise for maximum results. Find what will work for you.
  • Great article. I was down to my last 3 pounds and plateaued. Then I started gaining it back. I'm now up 10#. I will give some of these tips a try and see how I do! Thanks Coach Nicole!
  • Been on a plateau since early March. The only changes have been belly shrinkage! This article came at a good time. I've been furious with myself.
  • Starvation mode really only applies when you are literally starving ...and it still won't make you gain weight.. Now it's true that it's probably hard to get in enough nutrients below a certain level and I do agree that eating too little tends to make people want to go overboard when they do eat.
  • SILVERYESTERDAY
    I really shouldn't read the comments sections
  • This "starvation mode" thing is bogus and I'm always sad to see a reputable site promote it. Sure, you typically need around 1200 calories per day to get the minimum amount of nutrition necessary for most people, but eating less won't cause you to gain weight. Routinely eating fewer than 1200 Kc for weight loss just typically leads to binging, "cheating", and unsustainable habits.
  • MELJONES3478
    If you consume less than 1200 calories your body is not getting all the nutrients that it needs.
  • PURPLEKTY
    This came at a good time for me...me and my workout buddy have been trying to figure out why we hit a plateau and this could be it...Our level of active has so increased since we started working out....and we have stayed at the same calorie intake since we started loosing weight...So we are going to give this a try....Thank you
  • I am glad they put this up because I used to be 230 lbs. and got down to 145 lbs. but I hit a plateau and I just gave up and now I am 162.8 lbs. Now I'm gonna be more fit, follow these tips, and exercise more and what not :) Oh yeah and this time I'm toning because I didn't tone up last time neither, my maximum goal is 120-110 lbs. I'm only 5'2".
  • I am at a total loss as to how to get to the page where we input our info to get our caloric needs figured out -it's been over two years, and I need to review it. The links in artcicles only lead me to ads. Where can I get to that page so i can make any changes necessary?
  • I need to bring my FOCUS back . Instead of sitting on the couch watching tv I need to get up and do crunches or lift some weights. Once started it's not so hard.
  • Good information.
  • This article came at a perfect time!
  • I discovered a way to break through plateaus. It started with ExerciseTV on DEMAND TV with Comcast. I did Jillian Michaels 30 min. videos. 1 minute cardio,1 minute light weight training. You keep alternating the cardio with the weights for 30 minutes. All of a sudden, the weight just started to come off easily. I'm 2 lbs. away from my Spark goal of 150 lbs. , but I'd like to lose about 12 more to reach 138. I don't know if this "trick" will work for everyone, but it's worth a try. Your heart rate stays elevated for the whole 30 mins. thus burning fat. I try to do two 30 min. videos a day.

About The Author

Nicole Nichols Nicole Nichols
A certified personal trainer and fitness instructor with a bachelor's degree in health education, Nicole loves living a healthy and fit lifestyle and helping others do the same. Nicole was formerly SparkPeople's fitness expert and editor-in-chief, known on the site as "Coach Nicole." Make sure to explore more of her articles and blog posts.

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