Fitness Articles

11 Exercises That Help Decrease Knee Pain

Need Pain-Free Knees? Start Here!

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If your knees are giving you problems, and you feel like the Tin Man from "The Wizard of Oz" when getting out of bed, you’re not alone. Nearly 50 million Americans feel the same way.

Knees are the most commonly injured joints in the body. Considering that when you simply walk up stairs, the pressure across your knee joints is four times your body weight, it isn't surprising. Simple, everyday wear and tear can end up hurting your mobility.

But it’s not too late. Like a rusty door hinge, with care and maintenance, you knees can be trouble free. Even if you already experience problems, exercising the muscles surrounding the knee joints— Quadriceps (front of thigh), Hamstrings (back of thigh), Abductor (outside thigh), and Adductor (inside thigh)—will help make your knees stronger and less susceptible to injury. Exercise keeps your joints from stiffening and provides needed support, making movement easier and reducing pain.

Here are some exercises you can do to both stretch and strengthen the knee area:

STRETCHES
  1. Chair knee extension: Sitting in a chair, rest your foot on another chair so the knee is slightly raised. Gently push the raised knee toward the floor using only leg muscles. Hold for 5 - 10 seconds and release. Repeat 5 times on each leg.
  2. Heel slide knee extension: Lie on your back, with left knee bent and left foot flat on floor. Slowly slide the left heel away from your body so both legs are parallel. Hold for 5-10 seconds, return to starting position. Repeat 5 times on each leg.
  3. Knee flexion: Sitting in a chair, loop a long towel under your foot (resting on the floor). Gently pull on the towel with both hands to bend the knee, raising your foot 4 - 5 inches off the floor. Hold for 5 - 10 seconds, then release. Repeat 5 times on each leg.
  4. Hamstring stretch: Standing, put one foot in front of you, toes up. With hands on the small of your back (or one hand holding a chair for balance), bend the opposite knee and hip (not your lower back), until you feel the hamstrings stretch. The upper body comes forward at the hip. Hold for 5 -10 seconds, then release. Repeat 5 times on each leg.
STRENGTH TRAINING
  1. Wall slide: Leaning with your back against a wall, bend your knees 30°, sliding down the wall, then straighten up again. Move slowly and smoothly, using your hands on the wall for balance. Keep feet and legs parallel, and do not allow knees to go out over the toes. Repeat 5 -10 times.
  2. Bent-Leg Raises: Sitting in a chair, straighten one leg in the air (without locking the knee). Hold for about one minute. Bend your knee to lower the leg about halfway to the floor. Hold for 30 seconds. Return to starting position. Work up to 4 reps on each leg.
  3. Straight-Leg Raises: Sitting in a chair, rest your foot on another chair. Lift the foot a few inches off the chair while keeping your leg straight. Hold for 5 -10 seconds. Return to resting position. Repeat 5 -10 times. (Also work on increasing the time, up to 2-3 minutes if possible.)
  4. Abductor Raise: Lie on your side, propped on one elbow. The leg on the floor bent, the other straight. Slowly lift the top leg, hold for 5 -10 seconds, then lower. (Ankle weights will increase the intensity). Do 1-3 sets with 12-15 repetitions each. Remember to rest in between sets.
  5. Hamstring Curl: Stand with the front of your thighs against a surface (a table or wall). Flex one knee up as far as is comfortable. Hold for 5 - 10 seconds, then lower slowly. If possible, do not touch the floor between repetitions. (Ankle weights will increase the intensity.) Do 1-3 sets with 12-15 repetitions each. Remember to rest in between sets.
  6. Step-Ups: Stand in front of a step, like a sturdy bench or stairs, about two feet high (or less if necessary). Step up onto the support, straighten your knees fully (without locking them) and step down. Maintain a steady pace. If you are comfortable with your balance, pump your arms while doing this exercise. Start with 1 minute, slowly building your time. Gets your heart pumping too!
  7. Stationary Bike: Biking is a good way to increase strength and range of motion. Make sure you have the right positioning of the legs. At the bottom of the pedal stroke, the bend in the knee should be 15 degrees. Start with 10 minutes and slowly increase your time.
Depending on your current level of activity and mobility, a good start is 3 stretching and 3 strengthening exercises, 3-4 times a week. Stretching can be (and should be) done everyday if possible to prevent stiffness and achy joints. These stretches can be done a few times a day if needed.
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About The Author

Jen Mueller Jen Mueller
Jen received her master's degree in health promotion and education from the University of Cincinnati. A mom and avid marathon runner, she is a certified personal trainer, certified health coach and advanced health & fitness specialist. See all of Jen's articles.

Member Comments

  • I need exercises that will help my hurting painful knees. I have wonderful knee joints but the cartilage behind my knee cap is gone. Yesterday I was injected with gel to hopefully help with the pain. I was told to always wear my knee brace and always use a cane to help lesson the weight load on knee. With that information what exercises can I do to help my knee pain while trying to get the extra weight off? - 7/17/2015 6:17:23 PM
  • I agree with previous comment - I'm not sure exactly what I should be doing from these descriptions - 'bending the knee' 'pushing knee down' etc photos, diagrams or video would help a lot. Or links to existing visuals perhaps.
    I need this! - 6/19/2015 11:01:23 AM
  • Thanks so much Jen!! I will try these right away. This information is what I really needed today with my left knee bothering me so much since I got up! - 6/18/2015 1:49:00 PM
  • CHICHARITA41
    Would appreciate a video or pictures to be sure I am doing it right. - 6/18/2015 12:22:44 PM
  • I am hoping for a link to a video on these. My knees are not recovering from being aggravated lugging carry-ons and taking the Christmas boxes to the basement. I am having trouble walking and am about to give up my job. I saw that another person asked for pictures. I can't figure out the first one.

    Thanks - 6/13/2015 12:59:48 PM
  • BANNERCORE
    These are fantastic methods! After my surgery at Banner Core which went great these helped me get back to running! If you guys are having any pain Banner Core gives great evaluations! http://www.banner
    corecenter.co
    m/hip-knee-pa
    in-assessment - 1/16/2015 1:58:19 PM
  • PT's commonly recommend that if you feel any pain, you either 1. stop immediately, or 2. you modify your movement so it's a smaller range of motion. For example, if you are trying to do leg lifts, but feel pain, try to shorten the range of motion. You'll still benefit, and will work towards more range later! - 10/21/2014 1:46:46 PM
  • I find the wall sliding one hurts my knees a lot! It's that kind of pushing that sends a stabbing pain into the front of my kneecap.

    I went to my doctor about my crunchy knees and she just said, oh, that's grains of cartilage coming loose, it's an age thing, (i.e. bugger all you can do about it, or at least that she was going to do about it). And another Dr said that the pain in my bum/sit bones was sciatica, even though it doesn't go down my leg, and isn't affected by walking 7 miles a day. So I don't really have a lot of faith in Drs
    - 9/9/2014 2:18:19 PM
  • Can we see pictures of these please? - 9/8/2014 10:58:46 PM
  • A lot of my knee issue seem have come from 60+ years of being flatfooted! One thing that helps is to make myself wear tie shoes a lot more and a lot of problems get better.
    I "kneed" all the good suggestions I can get. Use a lot of the recommended exercises already. - 9/8/2014 7:03:29 PM
  • Thanks Jen for the excellent article.
    I have bad knees (dislocating). As a teen it was suggested I start cycling. Lucky for me I love it. It has helped stabilize my knees and I am healthier for it. I had to have knee surgery to repair a broken knee cap (wrong place wrong time when I fell). They told me after the surgery that I had advanced osteoarthritis. I never knew because the cycling - indoor in the winter - keep my knees limber.
    I printed the article and will be using the exercises! - 9/8/2014 11:13:15 AM
  • I have knee issues and have had them since I was a child. And then I have injured both knees a few times. That being said, traditional thinking is that we should strengthen our quads to improve knee stability and strength. Current research indicates that it is more likely hip weakness that causes knee issues. I am trying to do more work on my hips now, though quads and hamstrings aren't going to be neglected! - 9/8/2014 8:42:55 AM
  • I notice a comment about focusing on strengthening the quads. My understanding is that we don't want to work the quads and neglect the hamstrings, as this will in fact put uneven pull on the knee. We need to work both, so that both are equally strong. - 8/14/2014 8:44:27 PM
  • would like to see a video demonstrating these 11 tips. It's so much easier to do along with someone than written lists for me. But of course the written ideas are better than nothing. Thanks. - 8/4/2014 1:51:01 AM
  • Good exercise suggestions. Thanks - 7/22/2014 6:20:23 AM

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