Fitness Articles

10 Signs a Fitness Gadget is a Gimmick

Questions to Ask Yourself to Avoid a Scam

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Fitness infomercials promise a lot: dramatic weight-loss, big results, a six pack in 30 days! But unfortunately, most of them do not deliver on those promises. When those ads are so intriguing and believable, how do you know which new products deliver and which ones leave much to be desired?

To separate the real fitness tools from the get-fit-quick scams, just ask yourself the 10 questions below. If you answer, "yes" even one of them, save your money: It probably won't give you the results it promises!

10 Must-Ask Questions before You Buy Another Exercise Product

1. Does it sound too good to be true?
If it does, it probably is. The people behind these products and ads really are marketing geniuses. In a matter of seconds, they harness your attention. Within minutes, you believe that you can have the body of a fitness model in just minutes a day, too. But we all know that isn't realistic. Looking like a fitness spokesperson has everything to do with a very low body-fat percentage, which takes hard work, time and dedication. Here's another insider trick: When calculating how many calories a new product burns, many companies will test their product on a very large, muscular man to get an inflated number, which skews the calorie burn for most people. If the ad in question is promising results that logically aren't possible, change the channel.

2. Does it target just one body part?
I'm always getting asked how to lose weight from a certain problem area, but no matter where you want to target, the answer is the same: Spot reduction doesn't work. If the Booty Blaster on TV promises that you'll lose inches off your rear, it's lying! There is no way to slim down, lose water weight or trim inches from a specific area of the body just by working that body part. If you have body fat that is hiding your muscles, only a calorie-controlled diet combined with a sound exercise program (that also burns calories via cardio) will solve the problem. The same goes for abs machines that promise to give you a six-pack or whittle away your love handles. Sure, you can make your abs stronger with strengthening and toning exercises (which is awesome!), but you won't go from a size 12 to a size 2 overnight.

3. Does it fail to mention diet or nutrition?
Nutrition is such an integral part of losing inches, building muscle and dropping weight. If a product or fitness program doesn't address the nutrition side of the weight-loss equation (i.e. a reduced-calorie diet), then you can pretty much guarantee that it's a gimmick exaggerating its results. All the exercise in the world will not change your body if your diet isn't also in line with your goals.
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About The Author

Jennipher Walters Jennipher Walters
Jenn is the CEO and co-founder of the healthy living websites FitBottomeGirls.com, FitBottomedMamas.com and FitBottomedEats.com. A certified personal trainer, health coach and group exercise instructor, she also holds an MA in health journalism and is the author of The Fit Bottomed Girls Anti-Diet book (Random House, 2014).

See all of Jenn's articles.

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