Fitness Articles

Reference Guide to Aerobic Exercise

An In-Depth Look

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SparkPeople’s Exercise Reference Guides offer an in-depth look at the principles of fitness.

What is Aerobic Exercise?
The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) defines aerobic exercise as "any activity that uses large muscle groups, can be maintained continuously, and is rhythmic in nature." It is also defined as exercise that increases the need for oxygen. Aerobic exercise is used interchangeably with the terms: cardiovascular exercise, cardio-respiratory exercise and cardio. Some examples of aerobic exercise include: walking, jogging, running, dancing, rollerblading, bicycling, swimming, aerobics classes (both land and water), rowing, stair climbing, etc.

What are the Benefits of Aerobic Exercise?
Aerobic exercise strengthens your heart and lungs (which make up the cardiovascular system). During exercise, your muscles demand more oxygen-rich blood and give off more carbon dioxide and other waste products. As a result, your heart has to beat faster to keep up. When you follow a consistent aerobic exercise plan, your heart grows stronger so it can meet the muscles' demands without as much effort. Everyone, regardless of their weight, age, or gender, can benefit from aerobic exercise.

Regular aerobic exercise, performed most days of the week, also helps reduce the risk of illness and premature death. Regular aerobic exercise improves health in the following ways:
  • Reduces body fat and improves weight control
  • Reduces resting blood pressure (systolic and diastolic)
  • Increases HDL (good) cholesterol
  • Decreases total cholesterol
  • Improves glucose tolerance and reduces insulin resistance
  • Decreases clinical symptoms of anxiety, tension and depression
  • Increases maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max)
  • Improves heart and lung function
  • Increases blood supply to the muscles and
  • Enhances your muscles’ ability to use oxygen
  • Lowers resting heart rate
  • Increased threshold for muscle fatigue (lactic acid accumulation)
Source: “Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General”, CDC, 1999.
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About The Author

Jen Mueller Jen Mueller
Jen received her master's degree in health promotion and education from the University of Cincinnati. A mom and avid marathon runner, she is an ACE-certified personal trainer, health coach, medical exercise specialist and behavior change specialist. See all of Jen's articles.

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