Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

Nutrition Articles  ›  Pitfalls and Plateaus

11 Nice Ways to Say 'No' to Food Pushers

Politely Turn Down Food at Parties and Gatherings

-- By Erin Whitehead, SparkPeople Contributor
Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.
 
The Push: "It's just once a year!"

Your Response: "But I'll probably live to celebrate more holidays if I stick with my diet plan!"

Why It Works: People can sometimes see healthy eating as vain—a means to the end result of losing weight and looking better. It's harder for a food pusher to argue with you if you bring attention to the fact that you eat right and exercise for better health and a longer life. Looking good just happens to be a side effect!
 
The Push: "Looks like someone is obsessed with dieting…"

Your Response: "I wouldn't say obsessed, but I am conscious of what I eat."

Why It Works: Words like "food snob" or "obsessed" are pretty harsh when they're thrown around by food pushers. But don't let passive-aggressive comments like this bring you down—or make you veer away from your good eating intentions. Acknowledging your willpower and healthy food choices might influence others to be more conscious of what they eat. Sometimes you just have to combat food pushers with a little straightforward kindness.
 
The Push: "If you don't try my dish, I'm just going to have to force you to eat it!"

Your Response: "Sorry, but I don't like (or can't eat) [insert ingredient here]."

Why It Works: It's hard to argue with someone's personal food preferences. If someone doesn't like an ingredient whether its sweet potatoes, pumpkin, or butter, odds are that he or she hasn't liked it for a very long time. If you'd like to get creative with this one, go into detail about how you got sick on the ingredient as a kid or how your mom says you always threw it across the room as a baby. Who can argue with that?
 
The Push: "You need some meat on your bones."

Your Response: "Trust me, I'm in no danger of wasting away!"

Why It Works: This food push is definitely on the passive-aggressive side. Using humor to fight back will defuse any tension while making it clear where you stand. Continued ›
‹ Previous Page   Page 2 of 3   Next Page › Return to main nutrition page »
Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

Related Content


Stay in Touch With SparkPeople

Subscribe to our Newsletters

About The Author

Erin Whitehead Erin Whitehead
is a health and fitness enthusiast who co-founded the popular website FitBottomedGirls.com and co-wrote The Fit Bottomed Girls Anti-Diet book (available May 2014). Now busier than ever with two kids, she writes about healthy pregnancy and parenting at FitBottomedMamas.com.

Member Comments

  • What ever happened to plain old "no thank you?" It works and it's the most polite, in my opinion. - 4/18/2014 11:51:42 AM
  • That one about 'I'll have to force you to eat it' just brought my hackles up. My response would be, 'You can try, but my dad tried to all through my childhood, and he didn't manage it, so you certainly won't'. I loathe roast dinners because of him. Gah! - 4/18/2014 11:38:29 AM
  • I like the stall tactic. I have been a food pusher myself but I don't get hurt when people don't want to eat. Most of the time when I make something it gets eaten up and if not I know that I either made to much or it was a new recipe that did not quite work out. - 4/12/2014 3:02:54 PM
  • Ha! I used "Not right now, I think I'll have some as a snack later!" about an hour ago. DF thought I needed a cheddarwurst alongside my sloppy elk joe. - 3/13/2014 11:06:56 PM
  • great ideas. I've used a few myself but you gave me a few new ones. Thanks! - 2/22/2014 9:26:37 PM
  • Great article. I have plenty of "food pushers" in my life. This will definetly make it easier to deal with them. Thanks, Sparkle! - 2/22/2014 8:39:11 AM
  • SARAHELLO
    No Thanks, I'm happy with my pallate" - 2/22/2014 8:04:33 AM
  • I'm allergic :) - 12/12/2013 7:52:48 AM
  • As a vegan, I get this a lot. A LOT. All year round. "But eggs are good for you!" "If you don't eat meat, you get no protein!" and my personal favourite "You'll have osteoporosis in like 10 years" (and I am 24 years old!).
    Even if they want to shove their perspective towards food and their beliefs in my face, I find it pointless, disrespectful and exhausting to do the same.
    My physician gave me the best advice on the matter: "Thanks, I'm allergic" are the magic words! All animal products are very common allergens, so I'm always excused and it doesn't even have to be a big deal! - 12/11/2013 7:31:45 PM
  • I find it's easier to say thank you, take some and throw it away. Then tell them how wonderful it was. - 11/24/2013 9:14:16 PM
  • I tell them, "I have an allergy. I break out in thighs."
    Gets a laugh, shuts them up! - 9/2/2013 10:59:33 AM
  • "No, thank you" or "I'm good," take care of it for me. If they insist, I say firmly, "No really, I'm good." The only time it wouldn't work was with my grandma, but she was always far too good a cook for me to turn down anything she cooked. ;) - 9/1/2013 9:47:23 PM
  • "No, thank you" works fine for me. Short and sweet. - 9/1/2013 7:45:31 PM
  • I tend to be very weak when a food pusher is talking about desserts. However, I find the easiest way for me to get out of it is to either share the dessert, have a taste and then toss the rest when the pusher isn't looking, or claim that I'm not ready for dessert yet. - 9/1/2013 4:14:38 PM
  • I have a pretty easy out - I have a health condition. Usually dropping that line let's people know that the whole "diet" isn't really a diet, but a lifestyle that I need to stick to. - 9/1/2013 3:51:26 PM