Fitness Articles

A Beginner's Guide to Biking to Work

Get Fit, Go Green and Save Money by Biking

Bike-Commuting Essentials
  • A helmet! Protect your noggin at all times by investing in a quality helmet.
  • A bike in good working order (and tools to keep it that way). Michelle recommends investing in a bicycle that is in good working order, but not such an expensive one when starting out, unless you have a really safe place to store it. "Other than that, you should always have a tube, tire levers and a pump in case you get a flat," she says. "Oh, and knowing how to use these is a good idea. Depending on how much else you need to carry, you should either have a rack with a bag that hangs on it or some sort of a backpack or messenger bag. I use a rack and a bag that clips on to it and turns into a messenger-style bag when removed."
  • Lights and bright reflective clothing. No matter what time of day you're riding, you should wear some kind of bright, reflective clothing. That way even if you bike in the daylight to work, you stay safe on the way home when that meeting goes later than you expected! "Even if you are wearing your street clothing, pick up a reflective vest and some reflective arm/leg bands that won't mess your clothing and can be taken off when you arrive and stuffed in a pocket," Tanya says.
Avoiding Sticky (and Sweaty) Situations
One of the biggest reasons people don't like to bike to work is because they're afraid of not feeling fresh when they arrive at the office. However, many people solve this by just carrying their work clothes with them in a bag.

"I just leave my house in plenty of time, and I don't ride very hard," says Michelle. "I just kind of ride slowly and enjoy being outside, so I don't sweat. On my way home, I might push it or take the long way, but then I can shower when I get home."

If you do get a bit sweaty, Tanya swears by baby wipes, on-the-go pre-moistened facial wipes and extra deodorant. She also keeps extra shoes, an emergency set of clothes and a hair dryer at work so that if her hair or clothes get soaked (whether from rain or "glowing," as she calls sweating) she can look presentable.

Whether it's driving in, taking public transportation or hitching a ride with a family member, friend or co-worker, it's good to always have a back-up or someone you can call in a pinch if the weather is bad, you don't feel well, or your bike gets a flat that you can't patch.

While you should always follow basic safety guidelines, such as being predictable and signaling your intentions, Tanya also reminds that bike commuters always look around them, rotating where you are looking so that you cover all areas in your field of vision every 5 to 10 seconds. This includes looking underneath and in the windows of parked cars for pedestrians or drivers coming out, taking your time at intersections, coming to a complete stop and always being focused. Also, never assume that a driver sees you, she says.

Michelle says it's also important to ride on the correct side of the road and adhere to all traffic laws as if you were a car.

"When cyclists don't respect the rules of the road it makes us all look bad. Plus it is dangerous," she says. "I am aware that motorists are not always respectful of our right to ride on the road, but, if we are to deserve this right, we need to use it responsibly."
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About The Author

Jennipher Walters Jennipher Walters
Jenn is the CEO and co-founder of the healthy living websites, and A certified personal trainer, health coach and group exercise instructor, she also holds an MA in health journalism and is the author of The Fit Bottomed Girls Anti-Diet book (Random House, 2014).

See all of Jenn's articles.

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