Fitness Articles

Walking and Running Tips for City Dwellers

Get a Great Workout in an Urban Landscape

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Stay Safe Tip: While exercising on pavement or asphalt isn't too dangerous (except for the occasional pothole or bad driver), running on the road or sidewalk can be hard on the joints. In fact, concrete is one of the worst shock-absorbing surfaces. Asphalt absorbs more shock, but it's still not great (grass, wood chips and dirt are best). So when you can do so safely, jog on the asphalt.

City Fitness Tip: Use traffic and stoplights as interactive interval training. After a short walking or jogging warm-up, run hard to a stoplight and see how far you can go without having to take a break because of the traffic. When you hit a yellow light, perform a set of upper-body exercises such as wall pushups on a city building or triceps dips using a park bench. If you get stuck at a red light, hit that lower body with basic squats or lunges. You may get a few curious looks from people, but in a big city, most people have seen stranger things, right?
4. Get on track. Running in a circle may not strike your fancy, but running and walking tracks can be great places for city dwellers to work out in peace. On the track, you can easily track your distance, avoid the traffic and distractions of street running and, if you're lucky, you'll have an easier-on-the-body rubberized surface for your workout. Sounds like heaven, right? Tracks are also perfect for intervals. If you follow the walk-run training method, do fartleks: Run the straights (100 meters) and walk the curves (100 meters), or experiment with other distances marked on the track.
Stay Safe Tip: Running or walking on a track is much easier on your joints than running on the blacktop or concrete, but don't forget about personal safety. Tracks can sometimes be in secluded areas of the city that you're not familiar with. When in doubt, bring a buddy and keep your cell phone close!

City Fitness Tip: To find a running track near you, perform an online search for "running tracks in [enter your city]." If this isn't an easy search (some cities are better about posting their information online than others), call or visit your local running or walking specialty store. Ask them where the best—and safest—running tracks are in town.
5. Get active on your commute. Unless you work from home, you already have to commute to your job. So why not multitask with an active commute that doubles as a workout? Walking lends itself better to commuting since it won't leave you as sweaty and out of breath for your day on the job, but running or biking can also work.
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About The Author

Jennipher Walters Jennipher Walters
Jenn is the CEO and co-founder of the healthy living websites FitBottomeGirls.com, FitBottomedMamas.com and FitBottomedEats.com. A certified personal trainer, health coach and group exercise instructor, she also holds an MA in health journalism and is the author of The Fit Bottomed Girls Anti-Diet book (Random House, 2014).

See all of Jenn's articles.

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