Nutrition Articles

Meatless Meals Benefit Your Health

A ''Flexitarian'' Diet Meets in the Middle

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Now, replacing a sirloin steak with a can of pinto beans might not appeal to you. But how does roasted tomato-eggplant ratatouille with rice, or spicy black bean chili and cheesy cornbread sound? There are many meals like these that taste so good you won’t even think to ask “where’s the beef?” Eggplant parmesan, pasta salad, bean burritos, and vegetable fajitas are some good examples. Admittedly, a flexitarian diet will call on your creativity. Here are some tips to get you started:
  • Stock up on vegetarian cookbooks. Some good ones to try include Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, by Deborah Madison and The New Moosewood Cookbook, by Molly Katzen. These and many other titles are available at your local library, so you can check them out before you commit. Also visit SparkRecipes.com for a wide selection of vegetarian recipes.
  • If you’re cooking at home, make your main course meatless and serve meat on the side. You could have vegetarian lasagna and a salad topped with cubed chicken, roasted eggplant and zucchini sandwiches with antipasto, or spinach frittata and a side of organic sausage.
  • Pick a meatless day each week. Or go vegetarian during the week and omnivore on the weekends. This will give your body a break from processing all that cholesterol and saturated fat, and balance your overall caloric and fat intake.
  • Try some meat substitutes. Most vegetarians enjoy cold-cuts as much as anyone, but theirs are made from soy, and are lower in fat and cholesterol-free.
  • When dining-out, scour the menu for vegetarian options—restaurants usually offer at least one. If not, choose an entrée that is served with veggies and grains—like pasta, or stir-fry.
  • Fill up in the garden. Imagine your dinner plate is divided in quarters. Fill two quarters with veggies, one quarter with grains, and the last quarter with meat.
  • Eat your veggies first. Along with vitamins, they’re also loaded with fiber, which will begin to satiate you before you dig in to the meat.
  • Bank your meals for the future. If you go to a restaurant and order a steak, order a take-away container along with it. Cut off a section about the size of a deck of playing cards, and that’s your dinner. The rest will make a great lunch tomorrow and maybe even more—all for the price of one meal.
  • Skimp on cheese. There is a common pitfall for anyone attempting a vegetarian or semi-vegetarian diet—substituting one saturated fat (meat) for another (cheese). Remember that cheese is high in saturated fat too, and can contribute to health problems if over-consumed. Rely on vegetables and whole grains to fill in the gap instead.
  • Check out www.MeatlessMonday.com for more ideas and recipes.


What it all boils down to is balance and moderation. Although moderation never sounds exciting, the benefits to your health, your waistline, and your wallet can be very exciting indeed!


Want to learn more about going meatless? Check out SparkPeople's first e-book! It's packed with over 120 delicious meat-free recipes, plus tips and tricks for going meatless. Get it on Amazon for $2.99 and start cooking easy, wholesome veg-centric meals the whole family will love!
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About The Author

Liza Barnes Liza Barnes
Liza has two bachelor's degrees: one in health promotion and education and a second in nursing. A registered nurse and mother, regular exercise and cooking are top priorities for her. See all of Liza's articles.

Member Comments

  • FOXGLOVE999
    My family eats very small meat portions, we always have, 2-3 ounces per person, 5 nights a week. This seems completely reasonable. It minimizes our impact on the environment, and provides some of the nutrients only found in animal products, as well as adding complexity to our diet. I have no moral dilemma with meat consumption. Why should I apologize for my place in the food chain? But overconsumption of meat products is unhealthy and should be limited. - 10/16/2014 9:44:57 AM
  • I try to get my husband to eat spaghetti and sauce, minus the meat, but he just won't go for it. It would be better for our checkbook as well as better for us!I won't stop trying! - 6/30/2014 12:13:58 PM
  • This article felt more condescending toward meat and cheese than inclusive of vegetarian ideas. How about putting pears, eggplant, onion and other fruits/veggies on the grill? Pasta with garlic and olive oil? Why not? Then add a bit of mint. Fried rice with vegetables to give it flavor? Beans soup or vegetable stews? If done properly, a diet including meat can be just as healthy as a vegan diet, and meat-eaters can do both.

    I was once a vegetarian and there is a wonderful plethora of foods that kept me satisfied. I married a meat-eater, so now we eat meat, just as many animals do in the wild. I am thankful to these animals for giving their life and feel guilty only if the meat is wasted. Sadly, these animals do not know how to survive in the wild, only ranches. I also respect those like my best friend, nephew and cousin who are hunters and are incredibly in tune to nature and sit in a tree perch for hours. They eat everything that they hunt and have a love for their environment.

    Living in the full spectrum of the meat-eating scale, I really do not think it matters whether you eat meat or not; it is all fine as long as you are eating healthy meals. Even eating some cheese for protein and calcium is okay. Just respect different eating styles and embrace the diversity. - 4/11/2014 7:44:36 AM
  • ETHELMERZ,
    I have to disagree with your statement about not having enough land to grow vegetables. Not sure where you got your "facts".
    Think of all the land now being used to grow feed corn for animals who will be eaten for food. Not to mention all the land they occupy before being slaughtered.
    - 10/31/2013 6:00:45 AM
  • VERAMSW
    I am a vegetarian and have struggled with weight all my life. It can be healthier to avoid meat but it depends on how you eat overall. I don't eat meat for many reasons-- I do think meat is murder, but just as importantly I don't like the texture. The real reason I am commenting is that the statement about most vegetarians loving cold cuts twanged for me. It may be true that a lot of vegetarians eat veggie cold cuts (altho I personally don't know any) but I think it is false to say that most love them. I hate cold cuts and I agree that most of the veggie substitutes for cold cuts are laden with sodium. If I wanted something with the texture of meat, I would eat meat. - 3/3/2013 1:26:37 PM
  • ETHELMERZ
    I have known 11 people who are vegetarians, all of them have extra weight, too much grains, beans and cheesy foods, they enjoy alot of rice and veggie dishes. Two of them recently began to eat fish and chicken as side dishes, and lost weight, finally. It certainly isn't for everyone, and there is not enough land being used for growing vegetables to be enough if everyone suddenly became vegetarian or vegan, it would wear out the earth if that happened, saving nothing. - 2/19/2013 10:25:26 PM
  • I consciously choose not to eat meat as much as possible. I may buy some form of meat this year maybe five times. Some months, I may only eat two meat dishes. Others, like during the holidays, I eat more. However, I strive to not eat meat, and may someday just become a vegetarian. I consider myself flexitarian, and I'm proud of it. I strive to be what I feel is a consistent flexitarian: choosing to not eat meat whenever possible, but remaining flexible so that, for example, I can enjoy a Thanksgiving meal without having to fight with my family who wouldn't understand my viewpoints or enjoy freshly caught fish my dad was proud to have hooked. Some may see this labeling as pointless, most of which I've noted are people that sometimes don't eat meat, but on a more random or unintentional basis. That's fine with me if it's fine with you. However, the label isn't pointless to me, because I have labelled myself, and the label gives me more motivation to keep up with my goals. Just because you ate cheerios for breakfast and didn't throw hunks of sausage in the bowl but then chose a chicken quesadilla for lunch doesn't mean you are flexitarian, but it doesn't mean you need to criticize my (and other flexitarians') beliefs either. If you don't want to be labelled as flexitarian, then don't label yourself as it. - 1/3/2013 9:40:29 AM
  • I gave up meat for lent this year, and I did it completely the wrong way. I filled in the gaps with all the wrong food (cheese, cheese, and cheese), and (with school and everything) completely undid all of the hard work I'd done the previous summer. Maybe I'll take another go at this, but step by step. - 6/12/2012 2:10:46 AM
  • I'm living proof that not all vegetarians are lean and healthy. I've been strict vegetarian for YEARS and my weight has yo-yo'd like anyone else's would with an unhealthy diet. A lot of popular junk food is vegetarian; cake, cookies, etc. Not to mention, the soy meats are horribly processed junk with loads of sodium in them.

    I went VEGAN (no meat, dairy or eggs) for half a year once and lost over 30lbs with no exercise. I felt amazing too, but cheese and ranch dressing were my downfall. I should really try veganism again someday, maybe even raw vegan or fruitarianism. - 6/10/2012 12:27:48 AM
  • LOL at RAVENGIRL's comment. She knows what she's talking about.

    - 5/23/2012 4:26:36 PM
  • Tofurkey? Really? Not all vegetarians eat that processed garbage. This is why people react the way negatively to this particular lifestyle. I might as well eat fast food then eat that. UGH! Why not just promote a whole foods lifestyle instead? - 5/18/2012 10:35:30 AM
  • DEB_LEA
    Check our Mark Bittman's "Food Matters" book. He makes a good case for eating less meat and provides lots of great recipes. Michael Pollan has written several books that shed light on the food industry and has developed "Food Rules".... "Eat Food", "Mostly Plants" , "Not too much".

    - 4/24/2012 8:31:07 AM
  • There is no such thing as "humane" slaughtering. If I said that I was going to humanely murder you, would you be cool with that? My guess is probably not. There is no "eating in moderation" when it comes to meat either. Flesh is not a food group. - 4/6/2012 8:59:39 PM
  • "I love how whenever vegetarianism is brought up people who lack the willpower, discipline, care, or whatever to try it out get all up and arms and try to discredit the entire article. As if that changes the fact that this article is really just about incorporating more fruits and veggies into your diet. "

    Um, have to disagree with you on that... unless you call my 10 years meat-free as lacking willpower. No need to be condescending or rude about why people are attempting to discredit the article... have you thought that maybe the article is not accurate and relies on biased information? The article says a lot more than "eat more veggies"... if that's all it said, I would completely agree. Instead it talks of the benefits of avoiding meat, to which I do disagree and for good reason.

    In the end, I will also get a steak and big helping of veggies, so maybe we agree... although I may have more than 4 ounces of steak. :) - 4/6/2012 12:54:32 PM
  • I have two sister in laws who are vegetarian. When one came to visit I prepared in advance trying out vegan dishes on my family so I could cook food they could eat. We chose the tastiest meals and I practiced them. When my sister in law came she pushed the food around on her plate and several times went out to eat right after dinner. I was hurt that I tried so hard to please her and she didn't like my food. My other sister in law on the other side of the family did much the same thing, eating granola bars she had brought. The other members of the family loved the food so I wonder what the problem is. I used all foods that I either grew in my garden and organic seasonings and salt and stuff that was not animal based. Perhaps it would be easier just to let them eat their granola bars and go to McDonalds and not put so much effort into it. - 3/18/2012 11:51:04 PM

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