Nutrition Articles

Whole Grains are the Whole Package

These Natural Grains Pack a Nutritional Punch

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Adding Whole Grains to Your Diet
New dietary guidelines established by the U.S. government in 2005 recommend that half of your daily grains servings should be whole grains. That's at least three servings of whole grains per day.

The easiest way to increase the amount of whole grains you consume is to substitute some processed grain products with their whole grain equivalent. This is as simple as having a slice of whole grain toast in the morning instead of using white bread, or using whole wheat flour in pancakes instead of white flour. If you’re making homemade soup, toss in a handful of brown rice or barley for added fiber. Make your dessert a healthy one, such as oatmeal cookies, and you won't have to feel guilty—you’re eating whole grains!

While at the grocery store, be extra careful reading food labels. Words such as multigrain, stone-ground cracked wheat or seven grain don’t necessarily mean the product is made with whole grains. And color doesn’t mean a whole grain either—some brown breads are simply white bread with added caramel coloring. The Whole Grain Council created an official packaging symbol in 2005 called the Whole Grain Stamp to help consumers find whole grain products. But until use of the stamp is used widespread, look for the word "whole" near the top of the ingredients list. (For example, the first ingredient of whole grain bread or cracker should be "whole wheat flour".)

Besides switching to whole wheat bread, you can easily add whole wheat pasta and brown rice to the menu to increase your consumption of whole grains. Whole wheat pasta comes in all shapes and sizes and appears to be a darker beige color than regular pasta. You can find it in the pasta section of both natural food and regular grocery stores. If you’re not going to eat it right away, you can store an unopened package for six to eight months in a cool, dry cupboard. Whole wheat pasta is prepared the same way as regular pasta (but usually takes a couple extra minutes to cook). To ensure that the pasta isn’t mushy, rinse it off under cool water to stop the cooking process. One cup of cooked whole wheat pasta has about 200 calories and 4 grams of fiber.

Brown rice is healthier than white rice and has significantly more nutrients. The refining process that transforms brown rice into polished, white rice strips away most of the vitamins and minerals and completely removes all of the fiber and essential fatty acids—basically leaving only the starch behind. White rice must be “enriched” with vitamins B1, B3 and iron, but at least eleven lost nutrients are not replaced at all. Brown rice is a concentrated source of fiber, which speeds up the removal of cancer-causing substances from our bodies. It is also an excellent source of selenium, which has been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer. You can find quick-cooking "instant" brown rice, which are parboiled to speed cooking time. Because of this pre-cooked process, they are slightly lower in nutrients than regular, slow-cooking brown rice, which can take up to an hour to cook. However, look for microwavable pouches of brown rice on the shelf and in the freezer section. These are still high in nutrients and cook in minutes!

Studies Prove the Benefits of Whole Grains
A 2006 study by Tufts University showed that people who consume the most whole grains are 42 percent less likely to develop diabetes. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health found that people with a diet high in whole grains showed a lower risk of both diabetes and heart disease. In 1997, the FDA authorized the claim that the soluble fiber in oats reduced the risk of coronary heart disease; this approval was extended in 2005 to include the fiber in barley as well.

Whether you want to reduce your risk of disease or you simply want to eat fewer processed foods, adding whole grains to your diet makes sense. So the next time you sit down to watch a movie, bring along a bowl of popcorn and snack with a clear conscious. Whole grains couldn’t be tastier!
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About The Author

Leanne Beattie Leanne Beattie
A freelance writer, marketing consultant and life coach, Leanne often writes about health and nutrition. See all of Leanne's articles.

Member Comments

  • @Shadoza "Whole grains are good for you. Some folks read a book and trust the words as fact. The body needs what grain offers and whole grains are better than processed."

    Some folds read an article and trust the words as fact.

    Seriously, what makes the advice on here necessarily more correct than that of many other books that have multiple studies referenced (rather than the one study referenced here, and the Whole Grains Council - shocker they want you to eat whole grains!).

    If someone says the difference is the amount of experience, keep in mind that the authors of those books have just as much, if not more, experience.

    So, other than our own biases, who's to say which one is right? Maybe the new books are right and the people still pushing the way of thinking "grains are good, fat is bad", which they've been pushing to us for decades and yet obesity and diabetes still rise at an alarming rate, are wrong? - 6/19/2016 11:12:04 AM
  • I eat some whole grains (not brown rice, don't like the taste), but my DH is on a low potassium diet and can't eat a lot of whole grains. I'd rather he eat white bread and white rice and not have any trouble, thank you very much. - 5/2/2016 3:32:31 PM
  • this one is easy, as I've been eating whole grains since my mom brought them in when I was a kid. Brown rice and 100% whole wheat bread have been my staples for a lifetime. Especially the rice. Ooooh, I love rice!

    Yes, all grains are seeds. In fact every grain is a modified form of grass. They are all in the monocotoledon family. This includes corn. - 4/23/2016 9:56:12 AM
  • I love making all my rice in the rice cooker. I have changed to brown rice in the past year and I just love it!

    Great article..

    - 3/18/2016 6:48:02 PM
  • For those who still want to eat brown rice, using a rice cooker really helps speed up the cooking process (and makes the brown rice nice and fluffy). - 9/27/2015 9:34:08 AM
  • Thank you for the article! I only like to eat whole-grain bread. An article about how to read the whole grain label, which is widely in use now, would be helpful. Also, you need to be a bit more detailed when you say it's good for you because a lot of people in the comments are saying it's not. I think unless you have really bad blood sugar, you can eat whole grains for your fiber. So many people have diabetes, or pre-diabetes, and they think everyone does. We don't all have to restrict ourselves to a very limited diet, because we don't all have the same health problem. One of the reasons that I do not overeat is so that I CAN eat whole grains. I can enjoy bread in a sandwich, I can eat a potato roll, I can have shredded wheat cereal or oatmeal for breakfast. This is because I don't have diabetes and my blood sugar isn't out of control. - 7/18/2015 10:31:23 AM
  • Actually aren't ALL grains SEEDS??!? I know that wild "rice" is related to grass NOT rice. - 6/16/2015 8:49:08 PM
  • EXERCISEWARRIOR
    I think this article is helpful. I now have a better idea of what whole grains are, so when I shop I will look for them. Most important I will know what to look for. - 5/19/2015 12:03:30 AM
  • Thank you for the article. Since I started using SparkPeople, I have made an effort to make sure I am having my healthy grains in most of all my meals. - 8/13/2014 1:36:08 PM
  • I am newly diagnosed with pre-diabetes. Both my grandmothers and my father were diabetic. My husband's mother was severely afflicted with diabetes and I saw the effects of that. I have a couple brothers who are diabetic. I do not want to get there. I have just started a diabetes prevention program through our local YMCA. I do not want to become a diabetic. - 2/3/2014 4:49:32 PM
  • TIGEREYES2
    I'm a newly diagnosed diabetic type 2 and also have NAFL, I am very confused as to what I should be to eating. I have been told to eliminate wheat and to go on a lchf way of life. Any light on this subject would be greatly appreciated. I have read the Wheat Belly and have the cookbook. I think I have a good start, but meal planning is difficult. - 1/25/2014 10:01:13 PM
  • @Mindhorizon, I agree that most people in the USA eat too many grains. I do not agree with all of your statements though. Especially ludicrous is your statement that most of the nutrition in grains is better supplied by meat! Actually, meat and grains have completely different nutritional profiles. Eating meat instead of grain is swapping out one form of junk food for another. You do realize that meat eaters have far higher rates of cancer, diabetes, and heart disease than vegetarians?! Phytic acid--- there are tips online about how to prepare whole grains traditionally that neutralize phytic acid. This may be worth looking into for those not willing to completely give up grains. As far as the paleo arguments about what our ancestors did / did not eat 10,000 years ago, it can easily be proven that most foods, including fruits and vegetables, are not of the same varietals as what was eaten long ago. It is not just grains! Meats are also drastically different with animals today receiving huge doses of antibiotics (contributing to antibiotic resistance in humans who consume them) and hormones to reach unnatural sizes + they are confined to tiny spaces and don't get the amount of exercise animals in the wild would get. Plus, animals eat all of these grains you are trying to avoid. Another point, 10,000 yrs ago, there was not one monolithic diet that everybody ate. What one ate depended greatly on location. Not everything is as cut-and-dried as proponents of certain diets want to make it sound. Bottom line: we all have different genetics and must experiment to see what foods we do best on. Elimination diets can help identify allergens we are sensitive too. I do better on fewer grains, but my husband can eat 6 donuts and a loaf of bread and maintain single digit body fat and a completely flat, hard stomach at age 53. He is on the low end of optimal BMI, just like in high school, and has categorically never needed to lose a single pound at any point in his life. Life is clearly not fair. - 1/3/2014 11:37:24 AM
  • WHITE FLOUR IS REFINED WHEAT FLOUR

    @Surigood, eating white pasta and bread is NOT an improvement over eating whole grain versions. Do you realize that WHITE FLOUR IS REFINED WHEAT FLOUR in the 1st place?! Look at the label!!! Not only that, but white pastas and breads spike insulin causing rebound hunger. If you are sensitive to gluten, it is best to avoid or cut way back on ALL gluten containing grains.

    WHITE FLOUR IS REFINED WHEAT FLOUR
    WHITE FLOUR IS REFINED WHEAT FLOUR
    WHITE FLOUR IS REFINED WHEAT FLOUR - 1/3/2014 11:04:53 AM
  • does this mean i have to give up my ezekiel bread now - 1/18/2013 2:03:15 PM
  • 1954MARG
    Some people are sensitive to some things. Not everyone is. For most people the most important guide to having a healthy diet is having plenty of variety of foods and not too much of any one thing. - 5/28/2012 8:52:19 AM

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