Nutrition Articles

Lactose Intolerance and a Healthy Diet

Ditch the Pain, Not the Calcium

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Milk. It does a body good.

Unless it doesn't, that is.

While milk is an excellent source of calcium and protein, up to 75% of the world's population cannot properly digest lactose, the sugar found in milk. When they try, the result is tummy trouble that can range from a mild discomfort to severe pain.

Not drinking milk to appease a sensitive stomach is one option, but the calcium found in milk is essential to good health and a major building block for bones and teeth. It also helps your heart to beat, your muscles to contract (and relax) and your blood to clot.

So what should a person with milk sensitivity do?

Understanding Lactose Intolerance
Lactose intolerance happens when your digestive system lacks the enzyme lactase, which it needs to break down milk sugar (lactose) into simpler forms that can be absorbed into the bloodstream. When the milk sugar is not broken down and absorbed properly, additional water is drawn into the intestinal tract. There, the healthy bacteria found in the intestine ferment the sugar, resulting in symptoms that range in intensity from very mild to severe and usually begin 30 minutes to 2 hours after eating dairy. Gas, nausea, bloating, cramping and diarrhea are the most common symptoms. Lactose intolerance is a matter of degree; some people fall ill after drinking an entire glass of milk, while others would be sick after drinking a small sip.

Production of that important enzyme lactase slows down after age two, but most people don't notice symptoms until they are significantly older. Conditions such as celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn’s disease can also lead to lactose intolerance. Certain medications or illnesses, such as the flu, can cause temporary lactose intolerance, too.

Caucasians of northern European descent have the lowest incidence of lactose intolerance (about 15%). In contrast, up to 90% of Eastern Asians, 80% of American Indians, 65% of Africans and African-Americans, and 50% of Hispanics have some degree of lactose intolerance, according to Harvard Medical School. Because lactase levels increase during the third trimester of pregnancy, premature infants of all ethnicities at a greater risk of developing the condition.
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About The Author

Becky Hand Becky Hand
Becky is a registered and licensed dietitian with almost 20 years of experience. A certified health coach through the Cooper Institute with a master's degree in health education, she makes nutrition principles practical, easy-to-apply and fun. See all of Becky's articles.



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