Nutrition Articles

Common Foods That Could Be Hurting Your Belly

Avoid These Foods to Feel Better Fast

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Large Meals
Chowing down might feel good in the moment, but consuming a huge meal in a single sitting can cause pain, gas, bloating and more. Your best bet, at least for your digestive health, is to eat in moderation—never to the point of extreme fullness. Some people find they feel full longer if they space out their meals at regular intervals throughout the day. Starving yourself and then overeating later often leads to abdominal pressure and pain.

Leftovers
We've all been guilty of eyeballing the carton of yogurt that sat on the counter all morning or nibbling at tempting leftovers in the office break room, but one sure way to trigger digestive pain is to expose yourself to harmful bacteria that multiply when food isn't properly stored. Save yourself the pain and discomfort of food poisoning: If you're not sure how long it's been sitting out, toss it.

Beans & Other Musical Fruits
There's a short list of foods that are known to trigger gas and bloating for many people: beans, cabbage, onions, apricots, prunes, bananas and wheat germ. Figuring out if these foods are linked to your belly pain might help you alleviate it. Before cutting these healthy foods from your diet completely, experiment to see if different cooking methods can help make them more digestible. For example, rinsing canned beans several times before cooking helps cut down on the amount of gas they produce when eaten.  

Your Favorite Foods
You might think that the foods that cause you discomfort are the kinds of foods you hardly ever eat—or naturally have an aversion to. Unfortunately, you're just as likely to develop an intolerance or an allergy to foods that you crave and eat often. Don't cross a food favorite off your list of suspects just because you've always eaten it--or because you like it. It's important to be objective when determining which foods could be causing issues.

The best way to determine if a specific food is causing you digestive distress is to keep a daily food journal and work with a doctor or allergist to design an elimination diet to pinpoint the culprits. And once you have a list of what to avoid, closely examine all food labels for the suspects!

This article has been reviewed and approved by Becky Hand, M.Ed., Licensed and Registered Dietitian.

 
Sources
Eastern Carolina University, "Do You Suffer from Gas and Bloating," www.ecu.edu, accessed on December.
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About The Author

Robin Donovan Robin Donovan
Robin Donovan is a Cincinnati-based freelance writer and magazine journalist with experience covering health, medicine, science, business, technology and design.

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