Healthier Holiday Eggnog

Although your traditional eggnog recipe may be a family favorite, it may be unsafe for your loved ones. Making eggnog with raw eggs can be dangerous and deadly because raw eggs may contain the bacterium salmonella, which can cause food-borne illness. Anyone can fall victim to food borne illnesses, but some people (infants, young children, pregnant women, older adults, and individuals with weakened immune systems, such as HIV or cancer patients) are at an even higher risk.

To continue with your holiday eggnog tradition, use one of the following substitutions:
  • Use commercially-prepared eggnog, which contains pasteurized eggs.
  • In place of raw eggs, use an equivalent amount of pasteurized (frozen or refrigerated) egg product that has never been opened. (Because of the risk of bacterial contamination after opening, any leftover egg product should be used only in cooked products.)
  • Use cooked eggs in your eggnog recipe. Combine the raw eggs with 1/2 of the milk and sugar in a 4-quart double boiler. Cook and stir over medium heat, approximately 10-15 minutes, until the mixture coats a metal spoon and the temperature reaches 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Continue preparing your recipe as directed.
  • Try the safe Holiday Eggnog recipe below!

Holiday Eggnog Recipe
  • 5 cups skim milk
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 cup pasteurized refrigerated egg product
    or 1 cup pasteurized frozen egg product (thawed in the refrigerator)
    or 4 eggs
  • 12-ounce can evaporated skim milk
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon rum extract (optional)
  • 1 pint low fat frozen vanilla yogurt, softened
  • Ground nutmeg to taste
NOTE: If using eggs, follow recipe steps 1, 2, 3, and 4. If using pasteurized egg product, follow steps 1, 3, and 4 only.
  1. In a 4-quart double boiler, combine milk, sugar, and egg product (or eggs).
     
  2. Cook and stir over medium heat, approximately 10-15 minutes, until the mixture coats a metal spoon and the temperature reaches 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove from heat.
     
  3. Stir in the evaporated skim milk, vanilla extract, and run extract (if desired). Cover and chill 4-24 hours in the refrigerator.
     
  4. To serve, place softened frozen yogurt in a punch bowl. Gradually whisk in chilled eggnog mixture until smooth. Sprinkle with nutmeg to taste.
Click here to to redeem your SparkPoints
  You will earn 5 SparkPoints

Member Comments

I love the Silknog, I found it in stores around me right before Thanksgiving and was really happy to have it. It does taste like regular only thinner, but that's fine with me, that way I don't feel full and bloated after drinking it!

As we say in our family when we like a meal...this is a definite do over! Report
GIANT-STEPS
I have to admit that I used raw eggs in eggnog for decades without problem. Of course there is a slight danger in doing so.

Silk Nog is great. I get some every year but I learned not to wait too long because all the stores in my area run out. It is even better with a shot of wiskey or rum and a llittle fresh ground nutmeg on top! Report
Thanks for the tips about the silknog and silk spice flavors. I am definitely going to look for these! I know at my local Publix they have regular and chocolate silk... I'll have to look and see if they carry these flavors as well! Report
Ok I am new , were do we find the info on serving size and nutrition break down? thank you... Report
WISEWIFE
So concerned about the fat...not at all about the carbs. Totally backwards IMHO Report
I buy pastuerized-in-th
e-shell eggs especially for this and for spaghetti carbonara. They are available in most grocery stores, and the white beat up just like regular eggs. Much safer! Report
thanks for the option! sounds like do-able recipe! is there any nutritional info available on it? Report
Sounds good. Report
SilkNog sounds great. Report
SILKNOG, that's my solution. I told the ladies on my team about it... and they say the only difference they noticed was that it was thinner than the regular stuff. And guess what, it's half the calories of the regular stuff. You can find it next to the other soymilks at your grocery store. Report
How about using soymilk and Splenda?? Sounds good to me! Report
Yup, gotta have the calories, protein, etc... I'll go to work trying to figure it out by adding up the whole recipe's calories and dividing it out. I'll post it here when I'm done, okay? Report
KAIFAWN
Homeinzion, Silk makes an egg nog flavor that's pretty good, but I personally think that Silk's Spice flavor tastes almost exactly like egg nog. Report
LORYJ74
I too am wondering why no serving size, calorie count or nutrition info. I am very disappointed that this important info was left out. Please redo this article. Report
LORYJ74
I too am wondering why no serving size, calorie count or nutrition info. I am very disappointed that this important info was left out. Please redo this article. Report


 

About The Author

Becky Hand
Becky Hand
Becky is a registered and licensed dietitian with almost 20 years of experience. A certified health coach through the Cooper Institute with a master's degree in health education, she makes nutrition principles practical, easy-to-apply and fun. See all of Becky's articles.
Close email sign up
Our best articles, delivered Join the millions of people already subscribed Get a weekly summary of our diet and fitness advice We will never sell, rent or redistribute your email address.

Magic Link Sent!

A magic link was sent to Click on that link to login. The link is only good for 24 hours.