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GILLEYGURL's Photo GILLEYGURL SparkPoints: (34,572)
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4/20/14 8:45 A

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I have had this in both feet at different times. The first time I basically stopped running for about a year and that was how long it took to resolve itself. When I got it again several years later in the other foot I said no way can I stop running (I was a few months shy from a marathon). It was very painful and I found running through it actually made no difference in recovery time. In about 6 months it was pretty much gone. Now I still have some stiffness when I wake up in the morning (in both feet) but that's it. I did see the podiatrist for the first foot and he gave me a splint to wear a night. I think this helped a bit but not much. I did a lot of calf stretching on my own which also helped a bit. The podiatrist x rayed my foot and saw a heel spur had formed from this (bump at back of heel) which freaked me out. He said unless it bothers you just leave it. I now have another spur on the other foot. No pain though and back to running about 40 miles a week. Moral of the story....it seems to be one of those things that just needs to resolve itself with time and stretching.

If we all did the things we are capable of doing we would literally astound ourselves.

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RUNHAPPEE's Photo RUNHAPPEE Posts: 7,293
4/18/14 12:18 P

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I have been dealing with plantar fasciitis for years. And I have also completed many races including 2 half marathons while dealing with it. Listening to your body is definitely a must. Don't push yourself more than you think you can handle. Physical therapy worked wonders for me, which is where my podiatrist sent me after my diagnosis. I took the stretching exercises and advice they gave me and use them everyday at home. I also made sure to go to a running store and have my foot and stride evaluated for the best shoes for my feet. Shoes can be more expensive at a running store, so you can always find which shoes work for you and look on zappos.com for the same shoe, which will cost less most likely. Try these exercises , and remember when you start feeling pain, slow down or stop altogether. Good luck! www.athletico.com/2012/05/09/plantar
-f
asciitis-solutions/


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MBTEPP's Photo MBTEPP SparkPoints: (105,535)
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4/7/14 3:29 P

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A podiatrist is always smart, just make it one that works with athletes. Your local running store, or running club will have recommendations. I did not want to get into the expense of custom orthotics, so I did home remedies. I have read that elite runners have had much success with custom orthotics.

I struggled with PF for the first 6 months of last year, and until I got FITTED properly with the right shoe, did it finally subside. I know when my shoes are breaking down when I get PF symptoms back.

Here is what I found that worked for me. I did keep a foot bath of cold water by my sink and soaked my foot every morning and after every run. It does not have to be ice cold, just cold water. I wore an extra pair of running shoes in the morning as slippers, and it helped to avoid flare ups. NSAIDS helped.

Keep the calves and achilles stretched after a run. I did not find any comfort in the common exercises prescribed for relieving PF pain. This single exercise did helped me to stabilize my problem though www.jennyhadfield.com/how-to-transfo
rm
-your-running-form-with-one-single-eR>xercise/
. I think it strengthened the ligaments around the ankles.

I tried the inserts, and they seemed to help initially, but I have given up on them. Instead, I have chosen to run with properly fitted shoes, and with a midfoot strike that I learned through ChiRunning. I do not have any problems now that I have changed my mechanics. I am going the route of minimal shoes when mine wear out, as mentioned before.

When I run, I do wear a Pedifix Arch Bandage -P60 OSFM on my right foot faithfully to support the arch on that side. It is inexpensive enough to try.

I have heard runners having success with the Strassburg Sock, which is a night time splint to prevent flare ups in the morning. I could not justify the cost, not knowing it would work for me though.

Hope my experience helps. You need to listen to your body and do what is right for you. I did not stop running, even when I knew I would have pain in the mornings.

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MOBYCARP's Photo MOBYCARP SparkPoints: (306,109)
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4/7/14 8:29 A

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There are doctors, and there are doctors. For coming back from a repetitive motion injury, you want a sports doctor or a physical therapist. The PT can help you learn how to gradually add back exercise to recover without aggravating the injury.

Going into PT for a foot injury was the best decision I made in 2013. I'm now pointing at a a half marathon on April 27, and I used what I learned in PT to train through foot problems successfully. If I'd tried it on my own, I would have aggravated the injury. If I'd followed my primary doctor's advice, I would have just stopped running.


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STITCHERFRIEND's Photo STITCHERFRIEND Posts: 1,417
4/6/14 7:12 P

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The additional thing I would tell you is to take an NSAID like Alieve. I was told to take it to reduce the inflammation in my foot as well.




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LOGOULD's Photo LOGOULD SparkPoints: (113,145)
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4/6/14 7:00 P

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Swim, strength train, and lots of ice and elevation.

"Success is the result of what you do when the Woo Hoo is all through....."-ON2VICTORY (Robert)

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CHEERANGEL913 SparkPoints: (0)
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4/6/14 6:29 P

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Thanks for the advice! I've decided to hold off on running until seeing the doctor and have inquired about switching to the 5 mile distance at my race instead of the half marathon...thinking that maybe there's hope (depending on what the doctor says) for a shorter race.

Do you recommend cross training before I go to the doctor? Or just resting it?

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LOGOULD's Photo LOGOULD SparkPoints: (113,145)
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4/6/14 6:22 P

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Please.....wait until you see the podiatrist before you do more training. I battled through my training and two halfs last year, and even with orthotics, icing, stretching exercises etc, did so much further damage that I had to have surgery this past Jan. Just now, I will only finally be getting refitted for orthotics in a couple more weeks at which time I will have to begin my running training all over since the reconstruction will have significantly changed my gait. Taking this time of now may save your running ability altogether...truly a small piece to pay.

"Success is the result of what you do when the Woo Hoo is all through....."-ON2VICTORY (Robert)

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HOUNDLOVER1's Photo HOUNDLOVER1 Posts: 8,869
4/6/14 12:26 P

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Listen to your body, not to your doctor (who I am tempted to label in a way not appropriate to this website). I have heard endless stories of people for whom plantar fasciitis became something that they were dealing with for years.
I would recommend the following: stop running altogether and start walking in minimalist shoes or barefoot. You want to strengthen the muscles in your foot and ankle to where your feet will develop a natural arch. You can also do ballet-type exercises. Only do what you can do without pain. If you have pain even walking wait for all inflammation to go away first. Inserts may fix the problem of pain temporarily but will make things worse in the long run. It's like putting a cast on a limb to temporarily heal by immobilizing. After the injury has been rested (and iced) you can start very light exercise. Traditional running shoes or any shoes with a stiff sole and a heel will limit natural movement of the foot and overwork some muscles while limiting the range of motion of others.
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CHEERANGEL913 SparkPoints: (0)
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4/6/14 10:14 A

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Hi! I'm training for my first half marathon and was recently told by a doctor that I probably have plantar faciitis (I'm seeing a podiatrist in a week and a half to confirm). Anyways, the doctor gave me some foot exercises and told me I can keep training. I'm worried that I'm going to hurt myself further if I do so. I'm 8 weeks away from the race and don't really have time in that schedule to take additional time off without completely blowing my training (my 7 mile long run is today). Oh, and I bought inserts for my running shoes which are supposed to help, but I've only worn them on two runs so far. Usually the runs themselves are minimally painless, but then my foot hurts at night and the day after (sometimes longer than that)

Any advice? I'm worried that if I push my foot too much this will become an ongoing problem after the race as well.

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