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NJFAMILYOF5's Photo NJFAMILYOF5 Posts: 5,646
2/16/18 1:45 P

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Fibromyalgia goes beyond pain. It can also affect your thinking ability, a symptom called fibro fog, and your energy level, leaving you with extreme fatigue. Even though you feel these symptoms, they aren't visible, and there aren't any tests that can measure them.

You'll need to work closely with your medical team to address your specific challenges with fatigue and fibro fog, because they're a little different for everyone. Do your part by taking steps to conserve energy and overcome concentration and memory issues to power through your day.

They're Real
Severe fatigue -- more than just being tired -- affects up to 4 out of 5 of people with fibromyalgia. It often goes hand-in-hand with sleepless nights. Together, they leave you drained and exhausted.

While scientists are learning more about what's happening in your brain that causes the pain and some other symptoms, what's behind fibro fog remains unclear. That name says it all: a fuzzy-headed feeling that keeps you from thinking clearly. You may get distracted, forget or lose things, and struggle to keep up with conversations.

Over half of people with fibromyalgia say they have these kinds of problems, and many feel the fog impacts their lives more than the pain, tenderness, and fatigue.

Slow but Steady Exercise
Given how you feel, you may want to shy away from exercise. But it's one of the most effective ways to handle fibromyalgia.

When you're too tired to exercise, that lack of activity leads to greater muscle weakness and more fatigue. Over time, regular exercise lessens fatigue. Consistency can have a greater impact than intensity.

It's possible that exercise also creates a positive chain reaction that boosts brain function. Studies show a link between physical ability and thinking ability. People who can do more physically often do better in areas like attention and decision-making.


Start out at an easy pace. Work with a physical therapist to find the right beginner program for you and adapt it as you get stronger. This is especially helpful if you're nervous about exercising.

Strength training helps you regain muscle, and that helps with pain and fatigue for some people. Use resistance bands or a light weight to start.

Very gentle movement therapies like yoga, tai chi, and qi gong all get you moving, but yoga often has best effect on fatigue.

Scale Back
If you're frustrated by what you can't do, try pacing yourself. Cut back on less important activities to have the energy to enjoy more meaningful ones.

Break down big tasks into manageable bites. As you complete each one, you'll have a sense of accomplishment rather than feel discouraged.

Build in short rest periods between tasks. Keep a journal to find the best activity/rest balance for you.

Get Organized
Use an online calendar or app that lets you color-code activities by importance. Plan work projects and home responsibilities at least a week in advance.

Then take a big-picture look. Are there too many high-priority items and not enough down time? Make adjustments, even if it means sometimes saying "no."

Make Your Day More Fibro-Friendly
Take a fibromyalgia education program to learn healthy behaviors and how to tweak everyday activities for less stress.

If you work outside the home, talk to your employer about things that might help you do your job:

Take breaks more often
Change your work schedule
Switch to a different position that better matches your abilities
A psychologist or neurologist may be able to suggest more adaptations, or use biofeedback or cognitive behavior therapy to boost your focus. An occupational therapist can show you how to make physical changes, from a better workstation to stretches you can do at your desk.

Better Sleep
There's a strong connection between sleep quality and your level of fatigue. While some fibromyalgia medications may help, they may not be enough. In addition to regular exercise and pacing yourself, practice good sleep habits. These include a regular bedtime and wake-up time and a dark, cool, quiet room

Some people with fibromyalgia have a second condition that causes fatigue, like an inflammatory disease, anemia, or low thyroid. Get tested and, if needed, treated.


Help Others See What You Feel
Because fibro fog and fatigue aren't obvious, it can be hard for friends and loved ones to understand what you're dealing with.

Let the people in your life know that you have a disease that affects your muscles and causes pain, fatigue, and thinking problems. It might help to say researchers are pretty sure that certain areas of the brain don't process nerve signals correctly, leading to a wide range of symptoms.

When you ask for help -- and it's OK to do that -- be specific about what you need.




There's nothing to fear, you're as good as the best,
As strong as the mightiest, too.
You can win in every battle or test;
For there's no one just like you.
There's only one you in the world today;
So nobody else, you see,
Can do your work in as fine a way:
You're the only you there'll be
ALABAMASUSAN17's Photo ALABAMASUSAN17 Posts: 4,861
10/30/17 4:28 P

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emoticon Thank you for sharing this information on CFS and Fibromyalgia! I've been fighting with this for years and has no idea about some of this. Awesome article!
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Edited by: ALABAMASUSAN17 at: 10/30/2017 (16:30)
In the day of my trouble I will call to You, and You will answer me.
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NJFAMILYOF5's Photo NJFAMILYOF5 Posts: 5,646
10/22/17 12:36 P

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Fatigue is the central symptom in CFS and a significant problem for most people with fibromyalgia.
The term ‘fatigue' may be a misleading way to refer to refer to the physical and mental exhaustion experienced by people with the two conditions.

Manifesting as listlessness, sleepiness and a reduced tolerance for exercise, fatigue can be brought on by low levels of activity or for no apparent reason. Fatigue is often much greater than and lasts far longer than it would in a healthy person ("post-exertional malaise").

For people with CFS and/or FM, fatigue can have many causes. One is the conditions themselves, which leave people with less energy for daily activities. Other causes include:

Overexertion Being too active, living "outside energy envelope"
Pain Ongoing pain produces muscle tension, which is tiring
Poor Sleep Feel tired if sleep is not restorative
Deconditioning Lower activity level makes activity more tiring
Stress/Emotions Stress leads to muscle tension. Depression produces listlessness.
Poor Nutrition Lack energty if don't eat well or have poor digestion
Medications Drugs can cause fatigue as a side effect
You can address fatigue by matching the strategies below to the causes you experience.

Pacing
Treating pain and poor sleep
Exercise
Reducing stress
Addressing depression and other emotions
Improving nutrition
Considering medication changes
Pacing

Probably the single most important key to controlling fatigue and other symptoms of CFS and FM is to adjust activity level to fit the limits imposed by the two conditions. We call this "living within the energy envelope" or pacing. Rather than fighting the body with repeated cycles of push and crash, you seek to understand your body's new requirements and to live within them.

Living successfully with CFS or fibromyalgia requires many practical adaptations: developing through trial and error a detailed understanding of your new limits, and then gradually adjusting your daily habits and routines to honor those limits. Each person's limits will be different, depending mainly on the severity of their illness.

Other artilces on this site explain how to define your envelope and describe many practical strategies for living within it, such as scheduled rest breaks, short activity periods, switching between high and low intensity tasks and using a schedule. (See the Pacing archive.)

Pacing also includes mental adaptation: accepting that life has changed. Acceptance is not resignation, but rather an acknowledgment of the need to live a different kind of life. This acknowledgment requires you to develop a new relationship to your body.

In the words of one person in our program, "Getting well requires a shift from trying to override your body's signals to paying attention when your body tells you to stop or slow down."

Treating Pain and Poor Sleep

Fatigue is intensified by pain and poor sleep. Pain is inherently tiring and also tends to produce muscle tension, which in turn intensifies fatigue. Non-restorative sleep leaves you as tired in the morning as you were before going to bed. Treating pain and sleep using the strategies described in the next two artilces in this series produces the bonus of reducing fatigue at the same time.

Reciprocally, treating fatigue can have a positive impact on sleep and pain. Since feeling tired increases the experience of pain, reducing fatigue lessens pain. In sum, fatigue, pain and sleep interact with one another. An improvement in one symptom can have a positive effect on the other two. Probably the most common symptom to attack first is sleep.

Exercise

Exercise counteracts the part of fatigue caused by a lower activity level and the resulting loss of fitness. Exercise improves fitness, thus reducing the fatigue caused by deconditioning. It also helps combat pain, lessens stress and improves mood. For ideas on how to exercise safely, see the article Exercise.

Reducing Stress

Because stress is so pervasive in chronic illness and because it intensifies symptoms such as pain and poor sleep as well as fatigue, many people with CFS and FM use relaxation and other stress management strategies to combat it. See articles in the Stress Management archive for our ideas on both stress reduction and stress avoidance. Like other self-management strategies, stress management techniques improve multiple symptoms.

Addressing Depression and Other Emotions

Powerful emotions such as depression, frustration, anxiety, guilt and grief are a frequent consequence of chronic illness, a response to the disruption, losses and uncertainty it brings. One symptom of depression is fatigue, so treating depression can reduce fatigue.

As with pacing and stress management, addressing depression and other feelings triggered by illness can improve several symptoms. For ideas on managing emotions, see articles in the Emotions archive.

Improving Nutrition

People with CFS and fibromyalgia often experience several kinds of problems getting good nutrition. Lack of appetite or severity of symptoms may make it difficult to spend enough time to prepare and eat balanced meals.

Some possible strategies include preparing meals in ways that respect the body's needs (e.g. taking rest breaks, using a stool, limiting repetitive motions), buying food online or by phone, preparing and freezing meals when feeling better, and getting help.

Second, most people with CFS and FM experience an intolerance of alcohol and many are sensitive to caffeine and other stimulants, sweeteners (such as sugar, corn syrup, fructose, aspartame and saccharin), food additives (such as MSG, preservatives, artificial colors and artificial flavors) and tobacco. Cutting down or eliminating these substances may reduce symptoms and mood swings, and also improve sleep

Third, a substantial number of people with CFS and fibromyalgia experience food sensitivities or food allergies or have difficulty absorbing nutrients. Negative reactions include gastrointestinal symptoms (such as heartburn, gas, nausea, diarrhea and constipation), headaches, muscle pain, changes in pulse and fatigue.

Some common sources of food allergy for people with CFS and FM include dairy products, eggs, soy, wheat and corn. Other sources include tomatoes and potatoes; fruits; spicy foods; gas-producing vegetables, such as onions, cabbage and broccoli; raw foods; and nuts.

There are two major treatments for food sensitivities and allergies: avoidance and the rotation diet. The first step in both treatments is the same: identifying foods that trigger allergic reactions.

To do this, eliminate foods you think might cause problems, then reintroduce them one by one. If foods produce strong reactions, such as diarrhea, nausea, headaches or hives, you will probably have to eliminate them from your diet entirely.

Often, the elimination of just a few foods can improve symptoms dramatically. Alternatively, you may find you can tolerate a food if you eat it only occasionally. This is usually called the rotation diet. After eating a food, you wait a period of four to seven days before eating it again.

If you have food sensitivities, they may be caused by other conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); yeast infections, like candida; celiac disease, which causes a strong allergic reaction to wheat and other grains; and lactose intolerance, which is the inability to digest the sugar in milk.

Considering Medication Changes

Many medications, including some anti-depressants and drugs prescribed for pain, create fatigue as a side effect. To combat this source of tiredness, ask your doctor about fatigue when reviewing medications. A change of medication or a change in dosage may help.

You might also consider certain stimulant medications as a treatment for fatigue. Drugs such as Nuvigil, Provigil, Adderall and Ritalin can help those who are somnolent during the day, as opposed to just tired. (Somnolent individuals fall asleep watching TV, reading, riding in the car, etc.)

Edited by: NJFAMILYOF5 at: 10/22/2017 (12:39)

There's nothing to fear, you're as good as the best,
As strong as the mightiest, too.
You can win in every battle or test;
For there's no one just like you.
There's only one you in the world today;
So nobody else, you see,
Can do your work in as fine a way:
You're the only you there'll be
NJFAMILYOF5's Photo NJFAMILYOF5 Posts: 5,646
12/27/16 10:32 A

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Pain is likely the fibromyalgia symptom that grabs and holds your attention the most. But fibro fatigue can be just as insistent -- and to make matters worse, it can intensify your pain and make it harder to cope. The good news is that you can break or at least minimize this cycle by taking practical steps every day to fight fibromyalgia fatigue and elevate your energy. The first step: Listen to your body. When you learn to recognize the earliest stages of exhaustion, you can still do something about it before it lays you out flat.

When you're often tired, it's very tempting to sleep until noon and spend evenings on the couch. But the research is clear on the folly of this. Although it's important that people with fibromyalgia get extra rest, take more breaks, and avoid overdoing it with exercise, completely eliminating physical activity can be just as bad for your symptoms. So try to move some every day. First, check with your doctor on smart exercise choices. But even something small, like a 10-minute walk every day, can be helpful. You can gradually increase the amount as your doctor recommends.

You're no doubt aware of how excessive stress can trigger or exacerbate your fibromyalgia fatigue. In fact, some research suggests that the onset of fibromyalgia could be triggered by a severely stressful event, such as a divorce, a job loss, or the death of a loved one. So priority one for you should be learning to say no. Not overcommitting is one of the best ways to keep yourself from feeling stressed, which can help control your fibromyalgia symptoms. Use a day planner, and limit the number of things you schedule in a single day or week.

Do you always push to the end, even though you're starting to feel it? Then it's time to learn how to pace yourself to avoid fibromyalgia fatigue. Don't trust yourself to stop before you get tired. Plan projects in chunks right from the start. Break up laundry duties into 2 days. When you exercise, consider three short sessions instead of one longer one. Schedule a sitting break for yourself when you run errands. Above all, resist the temptation to take advantage of your "good" days. Aim to accomplish the same number of tasks on good days as you do on bad days.
aps can't make up for a chronic lack of nighttime sleep -- a common problem for people with fibromyalgia -- but a quick nap or midday rest can go a long way in minimizing fibromyalgia fatigue. So give yourself permission. Consider it essential. Even just a 10-minute power nap may recharge your batteries. And if you're tossing and turning at night, talk with your fibromyalgia doctor about steps you can take to sleep more soundly.


Eating a healthful diet is important for everyone, but when you are living with fibromyalgia, it's critical. A nutritious, well-balanced diet that includes complex, fiber-rich carbohydrates can help keep your energy levels steady so you don't suffer from low blood sugar -- a condition that can make you even more tired. Aim to include lots of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables in your diet, as well as whole grains, lean protein sources, and healthful fats. And certain supplements -- such as vitamin B12, D-ribose, and coenzyme Q10 -- may be helpful, too. Talk with your doctor about any supplements you are considering taking.

Feeling down sometimes is normal. But staying down is not. And what's worse, it will only make your fibromyalgia fatigue and pain feel worse. To foster a more positive attitude, start by saying, "I have fibromyalgia," and accepting it as a fact of your life, and then focus on the things you can control. More importantly, recognize that there are tools you can use to control your fibromyalgia symptoms and counter the emotional impact, as well. Explore some feel-good therapies such as positive visualization and self-talk, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or meditation -- whatever you need to do to foster a positive mindset.

When your fibromyalgia fatigue simply won't fade, no matter how many energizing remedies you've tried, it may be time to ask for help. Remember, there is no shame in seeking the support of family, friends, and colleagues when the going gets tough. Let go of your misconception that asking for help is a sign of weakness. In fact, it's a sign of strength, because you've recognized the power of a helping hand in managing fibromyalgia. So consider asking a friend to run a must-do errand, or your spouse to cook dinner for a couple of nights, or your kids to help a bit more with the housework. It may be just enough to help you rejuvenate your energy stores.


There's nothing to fear, you're as good as the best,
As strong as the mightiest, too.
You can win in every battle or test;
For there's no one just like you.
There's only one you in the world today;
So nobody else, you see,
Can do your work in as fine a way:
You're the only you there'll be
NJFAMILYOF5's Photo NJFAMILYOF5 Posts: 5,646
9/3/16 10:36 A

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How To Beat Fatigue
Learn more about fatigue, its causes and how to treat it, so you can feel your energetic self again.
Everyone gets tired from time to time. But when your need for rest seems excessive or becomes disruptive to your daily life, what once may have been run-of-the-mill tiredness has morphed into full-fledged fatigue. Many people with arthritis-related conditions experience fatigue. Up to 98 percent of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) report fatigue, as do 50 percent or more of those with lupus or Sjögren’s syndrome. The percentage grows higher when obesity, depression, fibromyalgia, congestive heart failure, lung problems or chronic headaches are present, too.

Many people describe fatigue as severe weariness and overwhelming exhaustion that doesn’t get better with sleep. If you find yourself with no energy even after a full night’s rest, it may be fatigue. People with chronic diseases can have fatigue that comes and goes, but many experience long-lasting fatigue. The bouts may seem to come out of nowhere because they aren’t preceded by extra activity, and they may occur even when the joints are feeling good.

Common Causes of Fatigue
To find an effective treatment to your fatigue, first you need to know the cause. Factors that contribute to fatigue include inflammation, chronic pain, hormonal changes, anemia, poor sleep, depression and stress. Also, the majority of people with fibromyalgia have chronic fatigue. Other conditions that can lead to fatigue are celiac disease, cardiovascular problems or lung problems associated with inflammation (such as interstitial lung disease). Several of these factors may be at work. But treating even one issue may provide significant relief.

Sleep and pain. For many people with arthritis, fatigue often is triggered by insomnia and unrefreshing sleep due to pain. Getting into a comfortable sleeping position is a challenge when joints are swollen and sore. Quality of sleep tends to be more important than quantity. Getting six or seven hours of deep sleep makes you feel better than spending eight hours in bed tossing, turning and waking up repeatedly.

Depression. People with inflammatory diseases are more likely to develop depression, which can increase fatigue. In people with arthritis, depression can also be a side effect of some medications, like prednisone. In addition, the depression may be heightened by the draining effect of dealing with the chronic pain of the disease. Chronic pain also affects the brain, causing unstable levels of hormones and neurotransmitters, like serotonin, which can lead to depression.

Medication side effects and fatigue. Some medicines can cause drowsiness in some people, which may contribute to fatigue. These include antidepressants called selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft. About 20 percent of people with fibromyalgia who take SSRIs report drowsiness as a side effect. Other medications have drowsiness as a common side effect, including pain medications such as oxycodone (OxyContin); some prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as diclofenac (Voltaren) or naproxen (Naprosyn); tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (Elavil, Endep, Vanatrip); disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as azathioprine and methotrexate; and antihistamines such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl).

Inflammation. Your body’s immune system normally helps to keep you healthy by fighting off germs that cause illness. But if you have an autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), your immune system attacks your own body. When your immune system is activated, it produces cytokines -- chemical messengers that regulate the intensity and length of the immune response. People with inflammatory forms of arthritis have constant high levels of these messengers, which lead to inflammation and can result in fatigue. It is as if your body were constantly fighting off the flu.

Anemia. Anemia is when you don’t have enough red blood cells. It affects up to two-thirds of RA patients and is common in people with severe joint disease. Chronic illness can lower the longevity of red blood cells. With too few or too-small red blood cells, your body doesn’t have enough iron, which normally holds onto the oxygen we breathe and distributes it around the body for energy production. Your body then has to work extra hard whenever you move. Even when performing normal daily activities, the muscles get tired faster, resulting in fatigue.

Loss of muscle mass. When you lose too much muscle tissue, the remaining muscles have to bear the burden of moving your body. Many people with severe RA are affected by a condition called cachexia, in which muscle mass decreases and fatigue increases. Cachexia is linked with high levels of cytokines produced by the overactive immune system. The biologic medications, such as adalimumab (Humira), etanercept (Enbrel) and infliximab (Remicade), block cytokines and may slow the progressions of cachexia.

Other underlying conditions. Other conditions may lead to fatigue. These include underlying infection; low levels of electrolytes (minerals in your blood that carry an electric charge, including calcium, potassium, and sodium); low levels of certain vitamins (vitamin D and B12), which help cells produce energy; problems with metabolism in the liver or kidneys; problems with thyroid function (hypothyroidism); or other chronic conditions, like hypoglycemia.

Medications to Treat Symptoms of Fatigue
To make it easier to find the cause of your fatigue, it is helpful to keep a diary of how you feel. Sometimes you may run out of time to discuss issues like fatigue during an appointment with your physician, so make a point to let your doctor know ahead of time that you want to talk about it. Then both of you will be better prepared to address the issue. Once you and your doctor have found possible causes for your fatigue, you can create a treatment plan.

If you have anemia, you will get iron treatments or the hormone epoietin (Epogen, Procrit). If your fatigue is more of a problem than your pain, you may need “activating” medications that increase energy. These include some antidepressants, like bupropion (Wellbutrin), and psychostimulants, like modafinil (Provigil), which reduces the excessive sleepiness brought on by sleep disorders such as narcolepsy or sleep apnea. For many people, a combination of these drugs and non-drug therapies, like exercise and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), reduces fatigue and increases energy.

For people whose fatigue is sleep-related – those who have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at night due to anxiety or insomnia – sleeping pills may help promote restorative sleep while reducing or preventing next-day grogginess. The newer medications, including eszopiclone (Lunesta), lorazepam (Ativan), zaleplon (Sonata), and zolpidem (Ambien), are less likely to trigger dependence than older sleep medications or mild tranquilizers, like alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), and diazepam (Valium). Headaches and daytime sleepiness may still occur in some of people.

Lifestyle Changes to Beat Fatigue
Exercise regularly. Exercise helps with fatigue in several ways. It increases muscle mass and strength, which make movement easier. It also increases blood circulation and flexibility, which reduce pain. In addition, exercise generates endorphins, which are brain chemicals that produce a sense of well-being and energy. If you are new to exercise, consult with your doctor or physical therapist. Gradually work up to two or three days per week of strength training and three to four days per week of cardiovascular exercise, such as walking, cycling or swimming, all of which increase your endurance and strength. Yoga and tai chi increase your range of motion and reduce stress.

Eat well. Eating is a pleasure with purpose: to nourish your body. Choose what you eat with care—healthy foods are your energy source. Reaching for nuts, fruits and vegetables, and whole grains will help your body make the energy it needs. Always start your day with breakfast. Make sure to include some protein, like an egg or yogurt, along with carbohydrates such as whole-grain bread or oatmeal.

Support your joints. Wearing a brace or using a cane when necessary can help take stress off your joints and the muscles surrounding them, which can help with fatigue.

Maintain good sleep habits. Be consistent. Go to bed and get up at about the same time every day. Each night, follow the same bedtime routine; this will signal your body that it’s time to sleep. Whether it’s taking a warm bath, reading a book, listening to music or doing a crossword puzzle, the ritual is right if it works for you.

Take a break. Listen to your body and rest between activities. Rest allows muscles to refuel for more activity. Plan regular time for breaks each day. You shouldn’t rest longer than you are active, unless you have a fever or an infection.

It may take some time and detective work to beat your fatigue. Try to stay positive and work with your doctor to find the right combination of treatments at the right doses to treat your fatigue. Remember that each person is unique in what causes their fatigue; likewise, each person is unique in what treatments work for them.


http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-art
hritis/pain-management/fatigue/beat-fa
tigue.php



There's nothing to fear, you're as good as the best,
As strong as the mightiest, too.
You can win in every battle or test;
For there's no one just like you.
There's only one you in the world today;
So nobody else, you see,
Can do your work in as fine a way:
You're the only you there'll be
NJFAMILYOF5's Photo NJFAMILYOF5 Posts: 5,646
8/5/16 10:55 A

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How can you regain your pep? Natural energy boosters – including exercise, dietary supplements and alternative therapies like meditation and acupuncture – can help.

Here are an expert’s top recommendations to combat fibromyalgia fatigue.

1. Energy-Boosting Supplements
Three supplements – B vitamins, magnesium and D-ribose – can help your body gain lost vitality.

“Making sure you have adequate levels of these nutrients can provide a significant boost in energy,” Dr. Teitelbaum says.

B vitamins: “Food needs to be converted to energy for your body to run,” Dr. Teitelbaum explains. “B vitamins help build energy molecules” – especially after a fibromyalgia flare-up, when fatigue is likely to be at its worst.

Take separate B-vitamin supplements, instead of one “B-complex” capsule, he advises. That way you’ll be sure to get the right amount of each. He recommends 25-50 mg each of B1, B2, B3, B5 and B6, and 500 micrograms (mcg) of B12.

And don’t be alarmed if your urine turns bright yellow. It’s a harmless side effect of the vitamins, he says.

You can also boost the B-vitamin intake in your fibromyalgia diet from food, including fish, poultry, meat, eggs, dairy products and whole grains, as well as leafy green vegetables, beans and peas.
Magnesium: This essential mineral is also key to producing and maintaining your body’s energy stores.

Low levels can disrupt sleep, a problem suffered by 80% of fibromyalgia patients. At the same time, chronic sleep problems can further reduce magnesium levels in cells, according to a 2004 Japanese study.

Get the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) – 310 mg daily for women ages 19-30, and 320 mg daily for those 31 and older – to prevent lethargy, Dr. Teitelbaum advises.

Magnesium supplements come in capsules, tablets and powders. But you can also get it through food, which means your fibromyalgia diet should include nuts (almonds, cashews and peanuts), seeds, legumes (beans and peas), whole grains and green leafy vegetables such as spinach.

D-Ribose: Supplements of this sugar, which the body produces naturally, are favored by body-builders because it fuels muscle cells, boosting energy.

Fibromyalgia patients who took 5 g three times daily increased their energy levels by 61%, according to a 2008 study conducted by Dr. Teitelbaum and published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

“Aim for 5 g three times a day for three weeks, and then twice a day after that,” he advises.

But don’t take more: You could develop mild headaches, Dr. Teitelbaum warns. (You’ll find ribose supplements in powder, gel capsules or chewable forms.)
Other supplements that help your body’s cells make energy include 200 mg daily of coenzyme Q10, a natural compound and antioxidant, or 1,500 mg daily of acetyl L-carnitine, which is made in muscle and liver tissue and is found in meat, poultry, fish, and some dairy products, Dr. Teitelbaum says.

2. Vitamin D
“Vitamin D deficiency is common in fibromyalgia patients because they often avoid sun exposure,” says Pamela Yee, M.D., of the Center for Health and Healing in New York.

The body makes vitamin D from sunlight on the skin – but outdoor activities such as walking, running and gardening often bring on fibromyalgia pain.

“They may be taxing on sore joints,” Dr. Yee explains.

To find out if you’re deficient, see your doctor for a blood test. A normal range is 30.0-74.0 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL).

If you have a deficiency, your doctor may suggest you take vitamin D supplements and increase your consumption of milk, salmon and other D-rich foods.

Supplements can ease fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue symptoms in patients who have a mild to moderate deficiency, according to a 2009 University of Western Ontario study published in Endocrine Practice.

The latest daily vitamin D recommendations are 600 IU (for women up to 70 years old) and 800 IU (for women over 70), according to the Institute of Medicine, a nonprofit advisory group.
3. Omega-3 fatty acids
The essential fatty acids DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) – known as omega 3s – help reduce inflammation.

“That can decrease flares and reduce symptoms, including pain and fatigue, of fibromyalgia,” Dr. Teitelbaum says.

Oily fish such as tuna, salmon and sardines are your best food source of omega-3s. Dr. Teitelbaum advises eating a 4-ounce serving, “equal to the size of a personal check,” at least 3-4 times a week for fibromyalgia support.

“When eating canned tuna, choose albacore, because it has three times as much fish oil as chunk light tuna,” he adds.

If you’re concerned about mercury or would rather pop a pill, take a fish oil supplement with more than 600 mg of EPA and DHA per capsule daily, Dr. Teitelbaum advises.

4. Acupuncture
This ancient Chinese healing practice is one of the newest ways of easing chronic fatigue symptoms in fibromyalgia sufferers.

About 40% of patients saw an improvement in fibromyalgia fatigue after completing a 10-week course of acupuncture treatment, according to a 2008 study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
Acupuncture “balances the energy that flows through the body and supports its physiological processes, including blood circulation, nervous system operation and immune function,” says Anne Jeffres, a licensed acupuncturist and associate academic dean at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in New York.

What’s more, it triggers the release of the body’s natural painkillers, she says. That means you spend less energy fighting pain.

And the benefits increase over time, Jeffres says.

“When first treated, a woman might find the effects last only a few hours,” she says. “As treatments continue, her results will generally last longer – for a day or two, then a week or two, and ultimately for months or longer.”

As a result, you’ll need fewer acupuncture treatments as energy levels increase.

“Most women only need periodic treatments once a month or once a season as maintenance,” Jeffres says.

5. Meditation
“Mindfulness” – a form of meditation that involves staying in the present moment – improves quality of life for women with fibromyalgia, according to a 2007 Swiss study.

Not only is it relaxing, but it helps stave off stress and depression, both of which can cause fibromyalgia fatigue, the researchers found.
For optimum fibromyalgia support, meditate at least once a day for a minimum of 10 minutes, Dr. Yee suggests.

“Build up to twice a day: once in the morning and once at night.”

Here’s how to get started:

Sit in a comfortable, quiet spot in your house or office.

Clear your mind of all thoughts (forget about your pain, kids, errands you need to run) and let a sense of calm take over. If you notice thoughts intruding, gently put them aside and refocus.



“Be patient,” Dr. Yee advises. It takes weeks, or even months, to learn how to shut out distractions (though you should experience benefits long before then).

6. Yoga
This flexibility-enhancing practice shows promise in the fight against fibromyalgia symptoms, including fatigue.

“It’s a good way to gently stretch your body, loosen up tight muscles and joints and ease stress,” Dr. Yee says.

Start slowly, with just one or two simple poses every day, she says.

For fibromyalgia poses, see Need Fibromyalgia Pain Relief? Try Yoga

Do each for about five minutes, once or twice a day – “or any time you need a little ‘pick-me-up,’ ” Dr. Yee says.
7. A good night’s sleep
You’d think that because you’re so exhausted, getting enough sleep would be easy. But 80% of fibromyalgia sufferers encounter poor sleep.

That’s because they have a brain-wave pattern typically seen in awake people, according to Harvey Moldofsky, M.D., head of the Sleep Disorders Clinic of the Centers for Sleep and Chronobiology in Toronto.

The pattern, called “alpha intrusions” or “alpha abnormality,” could prevent you from sinking into the deep sleep stages needed to feel refreshed.

The problem starts in the autonomic nervous system, which controls your body’s involuntary processes such as breathing, heart rate and digestion, with help from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS).

For fibromyalgia sufferers, the sympathetic nervous system – which helps mobilize the body under stress – “is in overdrive and often stays dominant, even during sleep,” Dr. Teitelbaum says.

To get a good night’s sleep, Dr. Teitelbaum suggests taking a melatonin supplement.

“All it takes is .5 mg,” he says. However, he cautions that most supplements are sold in 3 mg doses, so you should divide the pill into pieces.





There's nothing to fear, you're as good as the best,
As strong as the mightiest, too.
You can win in every battle or test;
For there's no one just like you.
There's only one you in the world today;
So nobody else, you see,
Can do your work in as fine a way:
You're the only you there'll be
EYEHEARTDANCE's Photo EYEHEARTDANCE SparkPoints: (2,141)
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8/1/16 9:57 P

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Something that helps me is doing 10 minutes of stretching first thing in the morning. I wake up feeling very tight. It gets me feeling like I can move again which encourages me to do just that. I target each area neck, shoulders, back, hips, hamstrings, and calf muscles.

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SDEHNKE's Photo SDEHNKE Posts: 2,239
7/31/16 10:46 A

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I had oatmeal and yogurt for breakfast. I'm still tired. emoticon

Suellen

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NJFAMILYOF5's Photo NJFAMILYOF5 Posts: 5,646
7/30/16 8:55 P

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5 Superfoods That Knock Out Fatigue

Do you ever find yourself feeling unmotivated, tired and lazy for seemingly no reason at all? For me, this has become a very common thing, particularly on those days when I don’t get in my morning workout. As a result, I end up guzzling down multiple cups of coffee throughout the day, which gets me going for a while, but ends up messing up my sleep schedule at night, leading to another unproductive day.

I knew there had to be a better way to keep up my energy without gorging on the sugar and caffeine. So lots of research and many grocery store trips later, I’ve managed to find some of the best superfoods that will knock out fatigue in a single punch.

Oats
There’s a reason why oats are such a beloved breakfast cereal. Filled with nutrients such as magnesium, potassium, iron and fibers, just one bowlful is enough to keep you charged for the entire day without causing a sudden crash in energy levels.

Walnuts
If at any time during the day you start feeling lethargic (particularly the post lunch work hours), grab a handful of walnuts and munch on them like a snack. The high content of omega-3 fatty acids helps to instantly boost your mood and kick back the fatigue.

Bananas
An apple may keep you away from the doctor, but a banana will keep you from nodding off at work. Bite into this fleshy fruit and you’ll get enough vitamins, fibers and carbs that will instantly get rid of dehydration and drowsiness.

Yogurt
A cup of thick, chilled, sweet yogurt in the middle of the day is a great option to keep your energy flowing in the right direction. The soft consistency makes it easy for the body to process and probiotics in yogurt help to curb feelings of fatigue giving you a quick burst of
vigor to carry on with the day.

Green Tea
For those who need a quick-fix for their fatigue, a steaming cup of green tea works very well. It helps to reduce stress, improve focus and boost energy levels and is a lot healthier and wholesome than your average cup of coffee.

Just a few changes and substitutions to your daily diet could go a long way in keeping up your energy levels every day. Trust me, I speak from experience.

by Jiyo wellbeing, Neha



There's nothing to fear, you're as good as the best,
As strong as the mightiest, too.
You can win in every battle or test;
For there's no one just like you.
There's only one you in the world today;
So nobody else, you see,
Can do your work in as fine a way:
You're the only you there'll be
SDEHNKE's Photo SDEHNKE Posts: 2,239
7/23/16 11:27 A

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Good advice.

Suellen
Outside Indianapolis


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NJFAMILYOF5's Photo NJFAMILYOF5 Posts: 5,646
7/23/16 10:43 A

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Coping with the symptoms of fibromyalgia is difficult at best. And managing the chronic fatigue of fibromyalgia takes great effort and planning. You may feel like others don't believe you when you are forced to cancel family gatherings or luncheons with friends because of the chronic fatigue with fibromyalgia. That's why planning your schedule without making too many commitments may be helpful, especially when fibromyalgia symptoms flare.

Most fibromyalgia experts recommend talking to others about your specific fibromyalgia symptoms. Then, they will know your fibromyalgia is real -- not something you've made up in your head. In fact, asking for help from your family, friends, employer, or coworkers is important. When you have help, you are better able to make it through the day, even with the limited energy you feel.

What Does Stress Have to Do With Fibromyalgia and Fatigue?
Reducing stress may give you a sense of control with fibromyalgia. Some experts believe that when people with fibromyalgia reduce their level of stress, they also experience a reduction in fatigue and anxiety. In addition, their sleep becomes more restful.

Can I Continue to Work With Fibromyalgia and Fatigue?
People with fibromyalgia who are able to work outside the home say they experience great stress on the job. Some say they fear they may be let go and be replaced by healthier, more qualified workers. Others are concerned because they are not able to perform the way they used to. Employers also report concern over the output of chronically ill patients. They cite reduced productivity, increased absenteeism, poor work quality, and increased workplace accidents. But if you stay mentally and physically able to handle your job responsibilities, you can continue to be a productive employee, even with fibromyalgia and fatigue.

Symptoms of fibromyalgia may wax and wane over time. You may, however, continue to experience muscle pain and fatigue. That doesn't mean there is nothing you can do. Here are actions you can take to help keep fatigue at bay:

If your employer will allow it, put a cot in your office or workroom. Then allow yourself to take rest periods throughout the day, especially when symptoms flare and you are fatigued.
Try to allow more time during the day to complete your responsibilities.
Budget your time carefully to avoid procrastinating. Procrastination can increase your stress level when deadlines come around.
Make daily "To Do" lists to remind yourself of the responsibilities you need to complete.
Limit outside commitments on work days.
Ask for help from coworkers when pain and fatigue are overwhelming. Pay them back with your assistance on days you feel better.
Take periodic breaks to avoid getting overly tired or stressed during busy workdays.
Listen to music during your workday to help keep your stress levels minimal.
Talk to your doctor about medications for fibromyalgia that may help improve sleep and ease fatigue.


There's nothing to fear, you're as good as the best,
As strong as the mightiest, too.
You can win in every battle or test;
For there's no one just like you.
There's only one you in the world today;
So nobody else, you see,
Can do your work in as fine a way:
You're the only you there'll be
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