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CAROLINATREKKIE's Photo CAROLINATREKKIE SparkPoints: (0)
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9/5/11 5:52 P

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Thanks Kim for a great post..... I appreciate all the help.

"Beam me up"
"He's dead Jim"
"Live long and prosper"
"Space, the final frontier"
"Everybody remember where we parked"


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KIMBEEJ16's Photo KIMBEEJ16 Posts: 540
9/5/11 5:25 P

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I agree! At some point in it's life, your dog is probably going to need anesthesia. Whether it's for a dental cleaning or to remove a growth, you do want to know what your vet's anesthesia protocols are. At our practice all pets get an IV catheter so there is instant access should vein access be needed. Also, we administer IV fluids to all anesthetized patients. This helps prevent dehydration and also keeps the blood pressure up to prevent damage to organs such as the kidneys. Monitoring equipment can vary, but a blood pressure monitor, EKG and pulse oximetry should be the minimum. Is your pet's anesthesia being monitored by an experienced Technician during the procedure? It is difficult for a veterinarian to concentrate on the procedure and monitor vitals at the same time. Who is cleaning your pets teeth? Did you know many states do not require certification or licensing of Technicians? That means the girl that was serving french fries last year and now has been "trained on the job" could now be cleaning your pets teeth and monitoring anesthesia! ASK!! Modern anesthetics such as injectable propofol to induce and isoflurane or sevoflurane to maintain with intubation are the safest. Many low cost clinics will use injectable anesthetics without the benefit of intubating (to provide airway safety and prevent aspiration). You get what you pay for in most cases. Also, what pain control is provided? Any procedure that will cause pain in you will cause pain in your pet. Animals just don't show it the way humans do. We must be their advocates!
Good post! Couldn't help putting in my 2cents. :)

CAROLINATREKKIE's Photo CAROLINATREKKIE SparkPoints: (0)
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9/5/11 11:51 A

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Going Under Anesthesia:

The possibility that your dog may someday need anesthesia is one main reason why you need to choose a veterinarian who is accomplished in treating Toy dogs. Although anesthesia-related deaths are rare, and usually the result of an allergic reaction, its use is potentially dangerous. Your vet uses anesthesia only when necessary (before surgery, for example).

Be sure you know how to clean your pet's teeth properly so that cleaning them under anesthesia isn't necessary. When your dog has to go under anesthesia (during spaying or neutering, for example), ask your veterinarian if any necessary dental work (such as pulling impacted baby teeth) can be done at the same time.

Be sure your vet uses one of the modern gas anesthetics. They are much safer than the old fashioned intravenous products.

"Beam me up"
"He's dead Jim"
"Live long and prosper"
"Space, the final frontier"
"Everybody remember where we parked"


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