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PRAIRIEDAWNPAM's Photo PRAIRIEDAWNPAM Posts: 8,631
12/3/08 12:33 P

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Thanks for your ideas, Honey.

Through both South Beach and diabetic resources I've heard about agave nectar. We've never tried it at our house, though, and will have to experiment with baking, etc. to see how it works versus replacing sugar with Splenda. Splenda has been my own diet solution, but its good to know that some people with diabetes have better BG reactions with agave.

We're still experimenting with whole grains for the family. Hubby likes soft, fluffy foods, not "crunchy bird seed", but I'll keep playing. :-)

I understand the fat/carb combining thing. It makes sense.

Back to South Beach, I don't know that I'd recommend Phase 1, the first two weeks, to a newly-diagnosed diabetic. Its quite radical and I know how crappy I felt on it as a non-diabetic, but I think Phases 2 (weight loss) and 3 (lifestyle) are quite good and follows most healthy eating plans, diabetic or not.


...Pam



Sparking and living a South Beach Diet lifestyle since October 15 2007!

GOALS:
-Return to my goal weight
- Complete a super-sprint triathlon
- Look good in a bikini

MY MANTRA:
"Do good, live healthy and become significant!"

CO-LEADER SOUTH BEACH DIET TEAM


 current weight: 125.0 
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HONEYBEAR027's Photo HONEYBEAR027 Posts: 1,058
12/3/08 11:37 A

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Pam,

There is a big learning curve with diabetes and the answers you are seeing here are the real life solutions. I agree with what has already been said. I do stay away from most fake things because they still do raise bloodsugar, but in unpredictable ways. I will have a little Splenda once in awhile in things like iced coffee, but I try to use agave nectar for cooking instead of fake stuff or sugar. Agave nectar is low on the glycemic index and doesn't spike my blood sugar.

For me it is all about quick acting carbs and slow acting carbs. I stay away from quick acting carbs like white rice, anything processed, white flour, white sugar, things with lots of corn starch etc. It isn't that I NEVER have these things, it is just that I try to avoid them and only have them sporadically. And when I do have them, I count my carb grams and bolus for them appropriately.

I focus on small portions of whole grains like quinoa, barley, wheat berries, brown rice, whole wheat pasta, whole wheat cous cous, lots of veggies and fruits, eggs and dairy, and sometimes fish and seafood. I also eat whole grain bread on occasion.

One of the keys for me if I am having a quick acting carb is fat - it slows down the absorption of the quick acting carbs, so that is why something like real ice cream (which has all that sugar with lots 'o fat) won't spike my bloodsugar but something like sorbet or fat free frozen yogurt are killers (all sugar, no fat to slow things down). The flip side of that is that large amounts of fat DO raise your blood sugar, just slowly over a longer period of time. That is why our insulin pumps have a square wave or dual wave bolus (gives you insulin over a sustained period of time instead of just a big bump at once). It is also why I stay away from things like french fries.

White rice is also a killer for me. I really can't eat it at all without a huge spike up in bloodsugar. I do better at sushi with crazy rolls with fatty sauces and fried things in the middle (avocado or fried shrimp) than I do with just nigiri sushi, but most times I just stick with the sashimi and I am fine. At chinese restaurants I eat brown rice if they have it or none.

These are all great suggestions, but your DH needs to figure out what works for HIM! I know I am wayyy more carb sensitive than other diabetics and most people can handle more carbs than me. For example, I am VERY carb sensitive in the morning and while I know lots of people that eat oatmeal for breakfast, I just can't do it. It spikes my blood sugar even though it is whole grain and shouldn't. I have even tried making it into pancakes mixed with a bunch of egg whites (hoping the protein would slow things down), but it still spikes my bloodsugar.

I also know that South Beach didn't work for me in the induction phase, because after the first two days I had sustained high blood sugars, probably from all the protein. I know it has worked for other diabetics but just not for me.

Peanut butter - I use Laura Scudder's or Adam's or really any natural peanut butter that is just peanuts and salt.

Ketchup - I just try not to use it. I do buy it for DH and get the store brand from Whole Foods because we don't eat high fructose corn syrup and theirs is made without it.

Thousand island dressing - I don't know what to say about this. I make my own salad dressings. I use some kind of acid (balsamic vinegar, golden balsamic vinegar, rice wine vinegar, sherry vinegar, champagne vinegar, red wine vinegar, lemon juice, lime juice, etc.), and a tsp of mustard, a smidge of crushed garlic, some salt and pepper and whisk in olive oil poured in a slow and steady thin stream until it makes an emulsion and tastes balanced. I like vinegar so I generally use more vinegar than oil, but the traditional proportion is 2 parts oil to 1 part vinegar. If we want something a bit different, I will make dressing with balsamic vinegar and after it is made I will put crumbled blue cheese in it.

-Honey

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SUPERDUPER26's Photo SUPERDUPER26 Posts: 1,553
12/1/08 5:20 P

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Yes, eating "the real thing" involves food with real sugar! I HATE fake food, the stuff that's low/reduced carb only because they took out the real sugar and dumped a bunch of chemicals in it instead. The sugar alcohols (found in malitol, sorbitol, and some others) do weird and unpredictable things to my blood sugar. I am way better off eating a carefully controlled portion of "real food" than going with the fake stuff. Carefully controlled being the important part, its not a free-for-all by any means, but when I take the time and energy to work out how I'm going to fit that one piece of really good food into my eating plan, it tastes better, feels better and I am a lot more aware of what I am eating.
Sugar is just another form of carbohydrate. Its not a bad thing when used in moderation and accurately accounted for. A generally well balanced meal is good for EVERYONE including those of us with diabetes. "No sugar added" just means they didn't physically dump sugar into the recipe, often times there are nearly just as many calories and carbs as the regular versions of things, so make sure you read the whole nutrition label and compare before buying. "Reduced sugar" is the same, there are still calories and carbs, there just as much direct sugar poured in the recipe.
In general "diabetic friendly" food is low in fat, and cholesterol and has little added sugar, but again, watch out for the total carb count, not just the sugar. Good food is good food, if it isn't good for you isn't good for him either, and vice versa. I get really PO'd at work when people keep asking me if I should be eating that (cookie, pudding, etc) and I always want to ask them if that pizza with extra cheese and pepperoni is really what they ought to be eating.... Good food is good for everyone, and as long as the not-so-good stuff is kept to occasional usage there shouldn't be any problems. Sorry, I'll get off my soapbox.

SLDC31, I have also found that I am much better off (especially blood-sugar wise) staying away from boxed/packaged foods. I can't help but think all those funny words that are hard to say have strange effects on body functions that aren't yet understood or noticed by most people. I'm glad I'm not the only one, sometimes I think I'm making things up : )

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PRAIRIEDAWNPAM's Photo PRAIRIEDAWNPAM Posts: 8,631
12/1/08 11:05 A

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When you all say that you prefer to eat "the real thing", does that include products with sugar in them? ITSCOREY was told to stay away from anything with added sugar and so that's why we were looking for alternatives.

I'm very confused by some diabetic recipes I've read in books and online. They include white flour and sugar, some of them. What makes a recipe a diabetic recipe, then?

SLDC31 wrote "...anything in a box we do not eat."

I've been following the South Beach Diet for over a year now and have pretty much eliminated packaged foods from my life. I try to eat only whole grains, count my servings of starchy foods, eat at least 2 cups of milk, look for lean meats and healthy fats, and have 4.5 cups of veggies or more per day. For ITSCOREY I expect that journey to be a slower one. Even though the coach and dietician have given my way of eating two thumbs up for him, he really doesn't like most vegetables or whole grains.

The upside to his new diagnosis is that our whole family is going to eat healthy foods now. (Yah, I finally got my way. LOL) I've chosen this way of eating. Hubby doesn't have a choice, though. Our kids will grow up healthier because of the way we eat, though.

I am very much a learner, I am also a worrier. I'll be asking more questions about avoiding the complications of diabetes.


...Pam

Edited by: PRAIRIEDAWNPAM at: 12/1/2008 (11:06)
Sparking and living a South Beach Diet lifestyle since October 15 2007!

GOALS:
-Return to my goal weight
- Complete a super-sprint triathlon
- Look good in a bikini

MY MANTRA:
"Do good, live healthy and become significant!"

CO-LEADER SOUTH BEACH DIET TEAM


 current weight: 125.0 
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115
SLDC31 Posts: 9
12/1/08 9:36 A

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Hi Everyone!
My husband has been a type 1 since he was 4 years old. We've been together now for 26 years and I have to tell you, it's been a tough 26 years. It's as if I was diagnosed as well from the first day I met him. We have tried all types of diets, meal planning, not counting carbs, counting carbs, free diet (that was fun in college we both packed on the pounds and the bloodsugars were completely out of control)and so on. Let's just say, if was suggested, we tried it. In the beginning, we were not as savvy as we are today. The technology was not available for us to have at home as we had to rely on quarterly visits with the endo to see where the A1C levels were at. I never went to the doctor appointments so I was getting second hand information most of the time. My husband was very old school when it came to care. As long as he was taking shots for what he ate things were good. Didn't matter what he ate just as long as he took a shot.
Our eyes were opened starting in 1985 when he almost lost his eyesight. 5 years of eye surgery at Johns Hopkins saved his sight, but we didn't really get on board with the true meaning of being a diabetic until 1999 when at age 39 he had double bypass surgery because of "diabetic arteries". Our life changed drastically that September and we have been on a search for the "right" diet combo every since.

What we discovered is first and foremost is that we have to work as a team. We've heard too many times from too many doctors that diabetes is 'not rocket science' and believe me, we've proved each and everyone of them WRONG! It takes a team of doctors and dedicated family to make life work for the affected family member. What we stumbled on while I was a member of Weight Watchers two years ago has been the secret weapon that has improved my husbands life five fold.
The secret is anything in a box we do not eat. Pre-packaged, processed foods, we stay completely away from or if we use them they are in extreme moderation. What we found is that if we go back to eating natural foods (fruits/veggies/fish/chicken/red meat in very limited amounts/real sugars in extreme moderation/whole wheat pasta and breads)the glucose levels seem to find their natural balance within the body and the amount of insulin needed can be decreased. We started counting carbs and using a sliding scale depending on the carb that he is eating. Once we had taken out all the processed foods, we could actually see how foods were effecting him on a daily basis. We found, for example, an item that is high in sugar (like a small piece of cake) may not cause an initial spike in his blood sugar due to the long term insulin he is taking. He may actually peak three to six hours after eating the cake; so, taking the extra insulin for the cake prior to eating the cake is not what needs to happen in his case. He needs to wait several hours after the cake to take the shot. Most of the time when he tries to compensate before the cake, he ends up crashing and needing to eat something more; therefore, having to take more insulin. Again, I think over the past 9 years we have earned our degrees in rocket science. :)

It's not an easy road. From my standpoint, you need to work as a team, you need to have a good relationship with his doctors and they need to know that you are on board as much as he is in the control of his diabetes. You have to become knowledgeable about diabetes. Read every article you can, find out about the new technologies, and learn about how different foods effect him. Know that it's not only the food that can cause issues, but hormones and mood can also play a big role in how a food will react within the body. You have to be a coach; a go to person; someone who can find answers; and the best partner a husband can have. Believe me, when I changed my attitude about our life, his life became a much happier and healthier one!


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TALTEXANNA's Photo TALTEXANNA Posts: 409
12/1/08 1:18 A

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I was diagnosed just over 2 years ago and so far I've found sugar free stuff has as many carbs. and that they do funny things to my bg. They're just more unpredictable than the regular stuff as far as what they do to my bg so I just avoid them all together. Besides, the "real thing" tastes so much better and does so much more to satisfy that I find I don't use as much of it. Just my thoughts.

:-)

Highest Weight: 171
Current Weight: 162


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PRNCSCUP1-2FULL's Photo PRNCSCUP1-2FULL Posts: 23,542
11/29/08 10:44 P

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Pam-- I'm thinking it is harder to adjust at your hubby's age, but I never knew a difference, being 4 when I was diagnosed, but still experienced serious problems! So.... HOwever, things are a bit better now with the insulin pump and such, so he will do just fine! It is all just adjustement and learning! I still learn something new every day here! Hang in there and hubby too!

Melissa, EST

Navy Ninja ~ Purple Belt

There is always that one summer that changes you.-Unknown

Ah, summer, what power you have to make us suffer and like it.
-Russell Baker

Summer: Hair gets lighter. Skin gets darker. Water gets warmer. Drinks get colder. Music gets louder. Nights get longer. Life gets better.
-Unknown

***A House Is Not A Home Without A Dog***



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PRAIRIEDAWNPAM's Photo PRAIRIEDAWNPAM Posts: 8,631
11/29/08 10:07 P

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Thanks for your ideas. We're still learning.

...Pam

Sparking and living a South Beach Diet lifestyle since October 15 2007!

GOALS:
-Return to my goal weight
- Complete a super-sprint triathlon
- Look good in a bikini

MY MANTRA:
"Do good, live healthy and become significant!"

CO-LEADER SOUTH BEACH DIET TEAM


 current weight: 125.0 
165
152.5
140
127.5
115
PRNCSCUP1-2FULL's Photo PRNCSCUP1-2FULL Posts: 23,542
11/29/08 4:41 P

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Hi Pam. I generally will use the regular ol' stuff and account for it in my insulin regime. I think there is lower sugar or sugar free ketchup out there, but the thought scares me! I thought there is PB out there too, but I stick to just a serving size of regular PB. I do use all the sugar free jellies and jams with my PB and double fiber bread. I use low fat or fat free dressings, but they are not low sugar. Alot of times I just use a little olive oil and vinegar on my salads. Or, just vinegar which is supposed to somehow help control bllod sugar! The key is moderation as in any healthy diet!


Melissa, EST

Navy Ninja ~ Purple Belt

There is always that one summer that changes you.-Unknown

Ah, summer, what power you have to make us suffer and like it.
-Russell Baker

Summer: Hair gets lighter. Skin gets darker. Water gets warmer. Drinks get colder. Music gets louder. Nights get longer. Life gets better.
-Unknown

***A House Is Not A Home Without A Dog***



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11/28/08 5:46 P

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Regular peanut butter is better than light peanut butter - less sugar, albeit slightly more fat. Check the carb amounts of favourite foods and figure out insulin accordingly. There are some items that I will not do sugarfree - the real thing is the only way to go, within reason. I don't think that small amounts of ketchup or thousand island dressings are too bad, it's all about moderation, right?

PRAIRIEDAWNPAM's Photo PRAIRIEDAWNPAM Posts: 8,631
11/28/08 4:53 P

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ITSCOREY and I are looking for suggestions on how to replace some of his favorite foods.

Thousand Island salad dressing
ketchup
peanut butter - is this a concern?

Brand name suggestions would be very helpful. Thanks.

...Pam


Sparking and living a South Beach Diet lifestyle since October 15 2007!

GOALS:
-Return to my goal weight
- Complete a super-sprint triathlon
- Look good in a bikini

MY MANTRA:
"Do good, live healthy and become significant!"

CO-LEADER SOUTH BEACH DIET TEAM


 current weight: 125.0 
165
152.5
140
127.5
115
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