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SNOWTGRR's Photo SNOWTGRR Posts: 691
4/28/13 10:55 P

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After a really good nights rest I wasn't as sore as I thought I was going to be. Thank goodness! because I am going to a flower show. My Mom and Son flew in to be with me and we had a blast.

We went and looked at all the displays. Different companies make displays and there is a competition for them. They were so beautiful. Many different varieties and concepts for the backyard. There were Kangaroo Paw as well as other natives that I don't know the names of. There were also Orchids as centerpieces or focus pieces in some of them. There was even an Orchid Tree. It's not a real Orchid but the flowers look like it.

On another floor there were Bog plants as well as California Natives. Some of the Bog plants were Sundews, Venus Fly Traps, as well as some Jack in the Pulpit types. The California Natives are very hardy and are used to drought as well as flooding.

On the third floor there were Orchids everywhere as well as Bromiliads and plants from Hawaii! Just amazing. They had a ton of Plumaria, Lily of the Valley as well as the Gloria plants. I also ended up with some Cala Lilly bulbs that have the colored flowers. It's going to be beautiful. I'm going to have my Mom take home my plants for me and take care of them until I get done with the Trek.

It was a nice easy day that started at about 11 and we walked slowly and took some breaks. We went out to dinner at Outback Steakhouse and had some shrimp on the barbie as well as a gluten free hamburger, some salmon and an Ahi salad. Two of us shared a dessert. I had only one bite but it was plenty.

After that I ended up going back to the room and just collapsing on my bed. My back was very sore still and I ended up taking my pain meds and resting the rest of the evening.

I did get 1,237 steps in and walking about for about 30 or so minutes at the show looking at all the pretty flowers.

Well it's time for rest. See you all in Pemberton tomorrow.

Patty emoticon



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SNOWTGRR's Photo SNOWTGRR Posts: 691
4/28/13 12:13 A

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Well yesterdays post was sidelined as it didn't seem to save. Bummer because I had a great one. Oh well! As for today I decided to get more extra exercise in than I should have. But there was no getting around it. I walked all over Pemberton taking in all the great shops there cranny poking about. It was a blast.

Then I found someone who was unloading compost from the bed of their truck. Well Me and Gardening are very symbiotic. So of Course I joined in and helped. I ended up working at that for about 4 hours! Back and forth with the shoveling. Of course I didn't lift the shovel but scooped and plopped it into the wheelbarrow. I didn't bend, twist or lift more than 10 pounds which is what my Neurosurgeon has put as the restrictions. He didn't say anything about pulling or pushing. Well my back is telling me about pulling and pushing. Sigh. So is my right arm. I'm keeping this short and sweet today. Tomorrow I'm going to a flower show so there should be a lot to tell you about.

I did 4,051 steps just today and did 4 hours of unloading compost in a garden. I'm pooped so to speak. emoticon It was horse compost you see.

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WACFIT's Photo WACFIT Posts: 1,160
4/27/13 11:20 P

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Weekly check-in: Group 6
Steps: (my goal 41,000+) Did 48,400
Exercise: days (my goal 40 min x 4 days) Did 40+ min x 6 days


Carol/WI "Quitting is NOT an option!"



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4/27/13 5:42 P

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I got a great deal of exercise n today!

21523 steps!

Patricia

Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain!!
- Vivian Greene

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IAMAGEMLOVER's Photo IAMAGEMLOVER Posts: 38,991
4/27/13 10:56 A

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I have done nothing this week. I ended up in the emergency room with pinched nerves. The Dr. has sidelined me from all exercise and has ordered me on bed rest. That lasted for a couple days. I can't stay in bed.

April 21--424 steps taken

April 22--524 steps taken

April 23--743 steps taken

April 24--didn't wear my fitbit

April 25--630 steps taken

April 26--552 steps taken--2 floors climbed--120 minutes in the water

April 27--587 steps taken

3,406 steps taken---2 floors climbed--120 minutes in the water

Edited by: IAMAGEMLOVER at: 4/28/2013 (11:33)
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SNOWTGRR's Photo SNOWTGRR Posts: 691
4/26/13 6:25 A

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Well my friend Lady Marcia you beat me today for sure. lol

Since I slept in way to late I'm working on catching up to everyone else on the trail. I look forward to getting to our next campsite. I hear it is near a waterfall called Beedleup Falls. We walk around the actual Beedleup National Park. There is a fee for getting into the Park proper. If we stick to the trail it's free. There is no camping within the park but it is fine in the campsite near the falls. The park was created in 1910 and declared a reserve in 1915. The Pemberton National Parks Board has been responsible for management of the park since 1957.

There are many interesting plants in the park. Since it has a very high water content some of the plants are bog plants or swamp type of plants.

Some of the plants are the Agonis which is a genus of four species in the plant family Myrtaceae. All are endemic to Western Australia, growing near the coast in the south west. Only one grows to tree size, the others generally grow as tall shrubs. The Agonis species generally have fibrous, brown bark, dull green leaves and inflorescences of small, white flowers. They are most readily identified by the powerful odour of peppermint emitted when the leaves are crushed or torn.

An inflorescence is a group or cluster of flowers arranged on a stem that is composed of a main branch or a complicated arrangement of branches.The stem holding the whole inflorescence is called a peduncle and the main stem holding the flowers or more branches within the inflorescence is called the rachis. The stalk of each single flower is called a pedicel.

The Hibbertia, or Guinea flower, is a genus of trees, shrubs, trailing shrubs and climbers of the family Dilleniaceae that is also found in the Park. The five-petalled flowers of all species are varying shades of yellow except for three. Those three have Orange petalled flowers.

About 150 species of Guinea flower occur in Australia of which two are also found in New Guinea. Also, 24 species occur in New Caledonia, one of which is also found in Fiji, and one other species is endemic to Madagascar. The genus takes its name from George Hibbert who was an English merchant and amateur botanist.

Given the similarity in flower colour and shape, the number of stamens is a useful method of identification as this can vary widely from 4 to about 200 depending on species.

Another interesting tree that is in the park area is the Red Swamp Banksia or Waterbush. It is a species of shrub or small tree in the plant genus Banksia. It occurs on the south coast of Western Australia. A 1980 field study at Cheyne beach showed it to be pollinated by the New Holland Honeyeater and White-cheeked Honeyeater.

The New Holland Honeyeater is a honeyeater species found throughout southern Australia. It was among the first birds to be scientifically described in Australia. It is around eighteen cm long and is mainly black, with a white iris, white facial tufts and yellow margins on its wing and tail feathers. It is a very active bird and rarely sits long enough to give an extended view. When danger approaches a New Holland Honeyeater, a group of Honeyeaters will form together and give a warning call. The sexes are similar in looks with the exception that females are, on average, slightly smaller. Young Honeyeaters less than a year old have similar colouring but have grey eyes and a yellow gape and "whiskers" near the nares.

The White-cheeked Honeyeater inhabits the east coast and the south-west corner of Australia. It has a large white patch on its cheek, a brown eye, and a yellow panel on its wing. It is a medium-sized black and white honeyeater, with a long, sturdy bill that curves downwards. It has large bright yellow tail and wing panels, with a large conspicuous white cheek patch on a mainly black head. The eye is dark brown. Young birds are duller (brownish) and paler with softer, fluffier plumage. They are gregarious, active and noisy with swift, erratic flight.

Another plant is the Acacia myrtifolia, known as Myrtle Wattle or Red-stemmed Wattle. It is a species of Acacia that is native to Australia. Its specific epithet 'myrtle-leaved' is derived from the Latin myrtus 'myrtle', and folium 'leaf'. It has distinctive red branches its flowers are creamy white or pale yellow and appear in winter and spring. These are followed by 4–7 cm long curved seed pods. It was one of the earliest plants described in the colony, having been illustrated by James Sowerby. James Sowerby was an English naturalist and illustrator. The use of vivid colour and accessible texts were intended to reach a widening audience in works of natural history.

The Darwinia is a genus of about 70 species of evergreen shrubs in the family Myrtaceae, endemic to southeastern and southwestern Australia. The majority are native to southern Western Australia, but a few species occur in South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria. The genus was named in honour of Erasmus Darwin, grandfather of Charles Darwin. They are commonly known as Mountain Bells or simply Bells. Many species in the genus Darwinia are threatened with extinction, being listed as Endangered or Vulnerable on the Australian National List of Threatened Flora. Land clearing and grazing practices have reduced the areas where Darwinia species grow naturally. Recovery is hindered by drought, changed fire regimes and susceptibility to infection by the oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi which kills the plants.

Some rare fauna are thought to inhabit the area including the Woylie, Numbat and the Tammar.

Another interesting feature of the park is the walk through karri tree. It is a 400 year old tree with a large man-made hole cut through at the base large enough for a person to stand in it!

Maybe I'll be able to come back and go hiking in the park to see all these interesting sights.

I'm loving the air being moister because I live close to the coast in California so I'm used to a more humid environment. The naturally dry air here in Australia has been hard on me. This area though is much nicer for me. The streams and rivers we are crossing are all helping me adapt.

We finally reach the campground and happily take off our packs. I chose to set up my tent and get my bed ready right away so I wouldn't have to do it later. Then I walked to the waterfall where I found quite a few of our group taking pictures. It is a rather small waterfall but it is pretty. The view from the side shows exactly how flat this falls really is. It is more like a cascade than a falls but it is beautiful none the less. The sound coming off of it is very melodious and not to loud at all.

I only had 1236 steps today but it was up and down small hills so it was just about right for me. I had saved a great vegetable soup for tonight so I went back to the campsite and cooked it up eating it with some hearty whole grain bread and some roasted garlic. Ahhh, a nice hearty warm meal after a nice hike.

As the sun sets the sounds of amphibious animals start to flood the night with their melodious music as the areas animals switch from daytime to night.

Patty emoticon



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LADYMARCIA1's Photo LADYMARCIA1 SparkPoints: (107,606)
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4/25/13 3:23 P

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I just love this challenge, especially since SNOWTGRR is leading the way!!!! emoticon

OK, she gets a A+ in the class, I'm trying to keep up but NOOOOOOOO she always gets there first and takes the best bed of all. emoticon

I've been doing my 6000+ a day and have been to the gym twice this week and if all goes well and I finally get out of work on time today (yes, I'm doing Sparks at my desk right now, it's lunchtime), I'm stopping at the gym on my way home. emoticon emoticon emoticon

Been a long week but I'm going to catch up this weekend on where I've been this week and where I'm going next week. All I know is that I'm hoping the weather is as nice there as it has been here. emoticon

Since I'm always behind my friend SNOWTGRR, I'm letting her take stock of all the Kino on the trees and I'm just trying to keep up with her. She clears the way for the rest of us. I'm looking forward to emoticon relaxing a little on our next stop.

I'm feeling better than I have in months and my clothes are getting a little looser than when I started on this journey so I know I'm making progress. emoticon

So when you reach the end of today and have had all our good emoticon AND emoticon , I'm going to have a sit and sip emoticon something exotic. Getting back into the swing after a tough week at work (I'm meeting'd out!!!).
I'm looking and feeling emoticon .

Doing my part to emoticon the trail. emoticon emoticon . emoticon


I think I can. I know I can. I will.

Don't let yesterday use up to much of today!




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SNOWTGRR's Photo SNOWTGRR Posts: 691
4/25/13 2:05 A

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I always love the beds that's for sure. I went to bed early as I wanted to get enough sleep for the hike today. I hear there's several bridges to cross and there are supposed to be many rivers/creeks/streams to go over. I also hear there are a lot of flowers and wild life to spot as well. I'm glad that I was able to charge my camera last night.

We start off early in the morning as this part of the trail is a bit harder than other places. There are many times we have to walk single file. Especially over the bridges. The flowers are of all the different colors under the sun! It's just beautiful and I keep taking pictures of most of them. Soon I find some really large "nuts" on the ground and look up at the tree and see them up top as well. I find out that they are called "Honkey Nuts" by the locals but is also known as "Gum Nuts" as well. ‘Honkey nuts’ were made famous by May Gibbs' children’s story books about the ‘Gumnut Babies’.

"Honkey Nuts" are from the Corymbia calophylla tree or the Marri or Port Gregory Gum Tree. The tree is a relative to the Bloodwood trees found elsewhere in the world as well. The name Bloodwood comes from the Kino that leaks out when the tree is mechanically damaged from the outside. I'll get back to the Kino in a minute. The Bloodwood trees are also known for having very large flowers and fruit. In Australia there are two varieties of them. They are both Eucalypts and the way you tell them apart is from the nut. One has a very thick wall to the fruit and is known as the Woody-fruited Bloodwood (Corymbia) and the other has a very thin wall on the fruit and is known as the Paper-fruited Bloodwood (E. subg. Blakella). Corymbia terminalis, also known as the Desert Bloodwood is a tree native to the interior desert regions of Australia. It is known for it's red sap as well.

Now back to the Kino. Kino is the name given to the "Plant Gum" or a specific sap that the tree covers it's boo-boo's with. It is in many of the plants but this variety is specifically very RED. It is very well known in the Eucalypts and can be harvested like Maple Syrup is from the Maple tree by making cuts in the bark on the trunk and hanging a bucket to capture it. It looks like Red-Current Jelly when it comes out but hardens in about an hour when exposed to air and sun. So timing is crucial. Kinos typically dry to an amber-like material, it consists of dark red angular fragments, rarely larger than a pea. Of the small angular fragments, the smaller are reddish, and the larger are almost black; thin pieces are ruby red. It is brittle and easily powdered. It has no smell, but a very astringent taste. The Kino once it is hard is partially dissolvable in water. What remains is a pale flocculent (flaky) residue which is soluble in boiling water but deposited again upon cooling. Kino is not absorbed at all from the stomach and only very slowly from the intestine. The drug was frequently used in diarrhoea, its value being due to the relative insolubility of kinotannic acid, which enabled it to affect the lower part of the intestine.

Kino also has an extremely high kinotannin acid at about 70-80 percent. Because of the high Tannin content it is used in tanning of hides. It is also used in medicine and dyes. As they are usually soluble in water, kinos found use in traditional remedies. Eucalyptus kino is used by Australian aborigines in a tea for treating colds. Kino, from other parts of the world, was employed as a cotton dye, giving to the cotton the yellowish-brown color known as nankeen.

Okay so back to the trail. We see the Kino on several trees around and can see it for ourselves. I'm also able to see many different birds and snap pictures of them for later identification. It is cute to see them flitting about in the bushes of the undergrowth. We hike in single file most of the way, spreading out when we come to the open tracks that used to house the railroads for the mills. Then back to single file on the narrow paths and across the bridges over water. lol Okay bad attempt at a joke.

I was so intent on the hike I got in 1757 steps today and worked out in the garden for 20 minutes planting and watering and cleaning out the pond filter. So I've got in my exercise for the day. My right elbow is killing me as I did to much after my Dr shot me up and made me feel better. It is also raining and so my whole body has been cranky. So before the Oxy catches up with me I better stop typing and not making sense. emoticon

Patty emoticon





Edited by: SNOWTGRR at: 4/25/2013 (02:14)
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4/24/13 3:05 A

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The night was nice. Listening to the little critters scurrying around in the night, looking for food and working on not being dinner. The morning was overcast and the fog went down to the ground. It was hard to see your hand in front of your face. We had our breakfast and packed up making sure to check and check again to make sure we didn't forget anything on the ground. We started to hike out and get on the trail.

We soon arrive at Donnelly River Village. The Village is actually an old mill town that was converted to a holiday village. They have a lot of wildlife that walks right through the town as well as on the Trek. This cute little town was originally called 'Wheatly' but the more common name is Donnelly River. In 1912 the town was used as a lumber mill making cross arms and telephone poles by the Wheatly family. It was closed about two years later.

In 1947 the Bunnings, Arthur and Robert, made plans to create a new mill on the Donnelly River with a steam engine it was the first one of its kind in the area. They purchased the engine from Onkaparinga Woollen Mills in South Australia. The mill and town provided employment and family homes for a large community for nearly 30 years. Many of these families have remained in the district. The mill however was shut down in 1978 as part of a Forests Department policy to close less efficient mills and was then became heritage listed.

Some natural attractions in the area include Four Aces, One Tree Bridge and Glenoran Pool. The Four Aces are 4 huge Karri trees that are in a straight line. Somehow even in nature they grew that way. They have survived several forest fires. The One Tree Bridge was originally made in 1904 by felling one huge Karri tree over the Donnelly River and making a bridge out of it. It was in constant use until 1943, it also survived several wildfires without burning down. The forest surrounding the One Tree Bridge was declared an area for conservation and recreation in 1974 and contains patches of 400-year-old virgin Karri as well as younger forest regrowth after logging. The Glenoran Pool is a swimming spot where there are picnic tables and BBQ's around. It is safe to swim there but I still would be careful and look about first.

The town has many friendly Kangaroos, Emu's and other wildlife in the area. Do be careful however as friendly as these animals seem to be they are wild and not tame.

We check into our accommodation and set about in the town looking at everything. We have fun with the wildlife and are very happy to have someone else cooking for us tonight.

I ended up with 1631 steps and 30 minute helping an elderly lady in her garden. It was a lot of fun and shows the natives that we are friendly. She was able to teach me about gardening in Australia and what type of pests they have problems with there. It was truly interesting.

Well it's sleepy time and I'm about to crash. I finally got my Robaxtin and my muscles are feeling a lot better.

Patty emoticon emoticon emoticon



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CATHYHASSPARK's Photo CATHYHASSPARK Posts: 1,052
4/23/13 10:20 A

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I went to the chair excercise website clicked on challenges it said I had to log in with a google email account??

Anyways I am moving , I am walking over 10,000 steps a day in combo with doing extra movement from bicep curls to squats , some days my legs work better than others which is why I also love the chair excercises!

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SNOWTGRR's Photo SNOWTGRR Posts: 691
4/23/13 6:33 A

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After such a wonderful and restful weekend with lots of very interesting diversions including that massage with aromatherapy I am so energized and ready to go.

We start our trek again and pass through the Golden Valley Tree Park. I'm very glad that I took the time yesterday to poke around as we really don't have much time to look. Also we are staying on the trail. It is still beautiful to see all the different trees alongside the trail. We keep going past the Park and come upon the edge of the Blackwood Valley.

The dynamic differences between the farmlands and wild forests are interesting to study. To realize that someone cleared the area to become farmland and has toiled long and hard to keep it is something to think about and realize how much easier it is to live in a city. It takes a dedicated person to do as such out here in the wilds. There really aren't any "day's off" when you are a rancher. There is always something to do for repair or maintenance not to mention the field work or animal work. It's like they are a breed unto themselves.

The mists in the valley are also picturesque. With the Karri tree tops above they remind one of a mountain range until the mists lift enough to see the trunks. The Karri are starting to become more numerous as we walk along the trail towering over the other gums like a king. The forest floor is becoming more lush with wild flowers and orchids of so many types I can't even keep track of them. I am still in awe of the sheer beauty and humbled by the nature of the forest. The colors and variety of plants and animals that have adapted to living here are so numerous the sheer numbers are staggering.

As we keep hiking we pass by the Southampton Homestead. It has an interesting past. It was originally constructed in 1862 by Richard Jones and his two sons Richard and William with mud-bricks fired on the site. It took them two years to complete and at the hight of the property being worked the Jones family managed some 27,500 acres! The produce included wine, wheat, fruit and 600 head of cattle. All the buildings of the homestead were the Homestead proper, kitchen/bakery, flour mill, Dairy, workshops, brick kilns, jetty, boat shed and workers cottages. It's no wonder it took them two years to complete.

The Homestead was named Southampton after the port in England that was near the town of Southampton that the Jones departed from. Mr Jones was no stranger to heartache and it seems he had his fair share of it. His wife died in childbirth in 1830. Being the first European woman to die in the new colony. His 3 month old infant, Joseph, died as well. Then in 1855 he purchased the land for the Homestead build a daub and wattle house with his two eldest sons, Richard and William, just to have it dramatically flooded in 1860. His daughter Mary was widowed in 1864 and brought her 4 children to live with him at the homestead that same year. His two sons never married so never produced an heir. Richard Jones died at the age of 81 in 1876. The two sons and Mary continued to live and work the homestead until William due to depression, poor health and eye sight took his own life in 1903.

Over the next 50 years the homestead changed numerous hands and fell into disrepair more and more with each change. Finally in 1960 the Forest's Department purchased it, planted pine trees and promptly forgot about it until in the late 1990's it was rediscovered and the heritage qualities were identified and the site slated for restoration. However that was not the end of it. In February 2013 there was a wild bush fire started by lightning strikes that razed the property despite the heroic efforts of the Firefighters.

The University of WA and University of Notre Dame Australia are still working to this day with the WA Heritage Council to learn more about this homestead. The archeological digs have found the original 1860 Homestead and the Mill. Of the seven buildings originally on the site, the archaeological survey goals are to identify the location, role and fabric of some of these buildings. The remains only have the most rudimentary evidence left.

Being a highly valued property it was recently awarded a triple-heritage listing with Local, State and Federal Australian government! The homestead is typical of mid-19th century construction so is a valuable site.

We pass by the Homestead and encounter the famous 'Cardiac' Hill. It is very steep going and we have to watch ourselves so that we don't trip and fall into each other. Nothing like the 'Domino' effect of people with backpacks on. lol As we top the hill we all take a very quick break and drink some water. There is not much talking happening as we all catch our breath and rehydrate. Then it is the 'down' side which doesn't look much less steep. lol So we have to really watch ourselves or we might go down hill rolling and falling instead. We keep a good distance between one another and watch our step here as well. We are truly not sure if 'up' or 'down' is better. It seems to be a toss up.

Karri Gully is located in the Dalgarup Reserve. Due to the moist area and the nutrient rich soil the Karri have grown to be the largest eucalyptus tree on earth. It is also know as one of the few largest trees of any species due to its growth of up to 85 meters! Definately one of the largest for sure. The undergrowth is incredible with all the colors and styles of plants and flowers. The numbers are intriguing and the orchids are amazing since they seem to grow out of nothing right on the trees or on the ground. There are more bog type species here because of the humidity so we see more flowers that closely resemble Jack in the Pulpit and some other bog live eaters as well. More Fungi are apparent and are growing on the sides of trees as well as on the ground of the forest.


We get into Gregory Brook Campsite and quickly set up our campsite falling into the rhythm of camping we have become familiar with. We cook our dinners and then go about exploring the campsite and the surrounding area. Some of us take the time to fish and quite a few of us are successful! So we clean and cook the fish sharing with all. Yum! We all clean up and start to quiet down as we all get ready for bed. It has been quite a day and we listen to the crickets singing and the frogs peeping as the rest of the wildlife gets to sleep and others wake up for their night time journeys. We are sung to sleep by the song of nature all around us as we lay our heads down for our own sleep.

Tomorrow is another day in paradise and we get to see more and more of the changing landscape and learn about what is coming up on the trail.

Patty emoticon





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EMMABE1's Photo EMMABE1 Posts: 17,842
4/22/13 8:22 P

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Good for you - you keep on walking!! emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon

Everyone smiles in the same language.

www.chairexercisefun.com


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4/22/13 6:58 P

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I don't care what week it is, I'm feeling great! I've been walking every day and I'm loving this challenge.

emoticon

I think I can. I know I can. I will.

Don't let yesterday use up to much of today!




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LESLIE2561's Photo LESLIE2561 SparkPoints: (85,916)
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4/22/13 3:15 P

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April 21st to April 27th

I am going to stay in Group 5 with a combined exercise and step target of 4500 steps per day, but I hope to get in 5500+ steps per day.

4/21 - 3245 steps (migraine)
4/22 - 5594 steps
4/23 - 10,903 steps (WooHoo!)
4/24 - 6003 steps
4/25 - 4896 steps (Birthday)
4/26 - 5705 steps
4/27 - 7050 steps

Total for week - 43,396 steps (Goal met and exceeded!)

(4500 x 7 = 31,500) or (5500 x 7 = 38,500 steps)

Edited by: LESLIE2561 at: 4/28/2013 (00:35)
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EMMABE1's Photo EMMABE1 Posts: 17,842
4/20/13 2:53 P

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Beth - this is week 4 - it only starts today!!
And yes there are people posting but they posted week 3 in the week 3 thread!!

Everyone smiles in the same language.

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~INDYGIRL's Photo ~INDYGIRL Posts: 16,002
4/20/13 9:37 A

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So we are no longer posting on here?

Life is happening now, not 10 pounds from now.

230 lbs lost without surgery, crazy diets, diet products, or extreme exercise- so have hope!

Bethd101@comcast.net 317-964-3202 for texting

To join my team, go to Team ~Indygirl www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
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EMMABE1's Photo EMMABE1 Posts: 17,842
4/20/13 12:34 A

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Week 4 – Bibbulmun Track Virtual Trek – is on my web site for you. (Exercise and trek notes)
1 – Go to chairexercisefun.com/ and click on the “challenges” button on the right hand side of the front page
2 – Open the “Bibbulmun Track Virtual Trek “ folder
3 – Read – “Introduction” brochure, “Trek Preparation” brochure, “Bugs and other Nasty and Nice Critters” Brochure, plus the previous weeks trek notes if you have not already done so! You can download or print them if you choose.
4 – Read - Wk 4 Exercise brochure – you can download or print it if you choose.
5 – Select your exercise and step target
6 – Start moving, increasing your step count each week, through exercise and movement, and recording your exercise time and steps in this thread
7 – Read the “Trek notes “ trek notes for that week and see where you are going with your exercise. You can download or print it if you choose.
8 – Record you daily or weekly step count in the Wk 4 – Bibbulmun Track Virtual Trek Thread.
9 - Write a blog on what you have seen, experienced, eaten and/or done – tell me when its finished for a goodie .(optional)
Join in the Week 4 Bibbulmun Track Virtual Trek discussion
10 – There will be a very special surprize on the last day of the trek for anyone who manages to finish all 6 weeks of the trek.
11 – HAVE FUN!! Any problems or questions – Please ask!!


Everyone smiles in the same language.

www.chairexercisefun.com


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