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11/29/17 10:32 P
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Love to write on my private blog about my journey

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11/10/17 10:45 P

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"One word after another.

That’s the only way that novels get written and, short of elves coming in the night and turning your jumbled notes into Chapter Nine, it’s the only way to do it.

So keep on keeping on. Write another word and then another.

Pretty soon you’ll be on the downward slide, and it’s not impossible that soon you’ll be at the end. Good luck…"

Neil Gaiman ~~ Novelist

Lou

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10/21/17 12:38 A
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Observant

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10/14/17 8:18 P

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More proofreading humor -- don't make these mistakes.

In "The Liar" by Nora Roberts she ended a chapter by the bad guy watching the two main characters with binoculars by saying, "Field glasses followed them through the trees and across the grass back to the cabin."

I pictured tiny binoculars with little feet running along behind them. She could have said, "His eyes, behind the field glasses, followed..." to make it clear.

Then, later, she told of two women entering a salon to get their hair done by saying, they came in to get hair.

Did the salon have baskets of different colored hair and the women came in to grab a handful of some blonde, some red, some brown...?

Lou

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10/10/17 6:41 A

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Two paragraphs a day

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10/10/17 4:34 A

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Buy a cute notebook and cute pens. Something That inspires u. I once had a fake gold pen but for some reason when I used it felt like William Shakespeare

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10/7/17 7:27 A

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A journal. Starting a new one. Getting a jump start on my new year's resolution.

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2/20/17 8:44 P

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Proofreading humor:

In "Curious Minds" by Janet Evanovich and Phoef Sutton:

Emerson hands Riley a gold bar. Two pages later he hands her the gold bar but she didn't return it to him. Hmm.

Bertie was sitting in his wheelchair on the eighteenth floor of the Blane-Grunwald building on Constitution Avenue. "The floor above the seventeenth floor."

Ya think?
*******
In "The Stranger" by Harlan Coben:

A father watches his son in college football tryouts and thinks if the boy can beat a time of 5.2 seconds in the forty-yard dash that he'd be a shoo in for a big name school. "If a prospect slower than that..."

Isn't a word missing there?
*******
In "Gray Mountain" by John Grisham:

Samatha thinks about going back to sleep but "The coffee was ready, the aroma drifting from the other room."

Except, she is alone, did not make coffee then go back to bed, and did not preset the coffeepot the night before.

Sooo, what ghost made the coffee?

Lou

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12/23/16 5:05 A

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Almost extinct words:

mentalfloss.com/article/51150/12-old
-w
ords-survived-getting-fossilized-idioms


Lou

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8/23/16 10:22 P

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How do you close the door?

www.brainpickings.org/2013/03/13/ste
ph
en-king-on-adverbs/


Lou

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8/17/16 9:09 P
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Thanks for sharing

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8/16/16 9:03 P

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128 ways to avoid using "very" in your manuscript:

mentalfloss.com/article/82484/replac
e-
word-very-one-these-128-modifiers


Lou

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6/15/16 10:18 A

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If we call ourselves writers, then we write, when we can, for however long we can, where we can, on any topic we can.

We think about the writing process, we talk about writing and the business of writing, we seek those of like minds and we gather to share ideas, to inspire, to encourage, to motivate each other.

We make NO EXCUSES!

In my opinion,

May I get a emoticon ?

Lou

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5/18/16 10:34 P
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Thanks for sharing

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4/28/16 11:12 P

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Need background on murderers for your book?

Check out: murderpedia.org/

Lou

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11/8/15 8:12 P

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In the Orlando Sentinel newspaper an article on diabetes had this sentence about a man with the disease:

"Ensign, of St. Joseph, Mo., began by educating himself about diabetes, which makes him two to four times more likely to develop heart disease."

Sounds to me that his odds of having heart problems would be less if he hadn't educated himself about diabetes. emoticon

Lou

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10/19/15 4:27 P

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Video #2: Avoid the Trap of Tired, Typical Writing

compeltraining.com/trapoftiredwritin
g/
?inf_contact_key=67aff42b489eaa58dffR>296e875303970f51d2fee83ca63fc836229b
9e947fec1


Lou

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10/19/15 4:19 P

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More proofreading humor:

In "Moving Target" by J.A. Jance, a patient's mother, named Phyllis, is introduced to a man who holds a ball cap in one hand "while offering Ali the other one." Huh?

In the same book, regarding a house fire, she writes, "The fire trucks were putting out hot spots..." Maybe the firefighters were but I'm sure the trucks weren't.
*******
In "The Dead Will Tell" by Linda Castillo, three friends meet in a restaurant where one, Snipe, orders whiskey to drink. She writes, " Snipe reached for his (drink, whiskey) and downed it in two gulps. Three pages later, without getting refills, "... Snipe finished his whiskey..." Huh again.

Later, the main character places an ankle monitor on a prisoner and it is written "I roll down the pants leg" (that she had rolled up to place the monitor). A few paragraphs later, about the prisoner she writes, "... he bends down to roll down his pants..." Hmm, so who rolled them back up in the meantime?
*******
It continues to amaze me that their editorial teams get such high praise yet allow mistakes such as these to pass by them.

Lou

Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 10/29/2015 (19:50)
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10/15/15 4:54 P

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Video on The Writing Journey and Key Habits:

compeltraining.com/writingandkeyhabi
ts
/?inf_contact_key=3f1080480e3b4bc6bcR>f1e1951d15154434149be8b74b755bd9664c
dd
fe19326d


Lou

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10/7/15 5:57 P

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“Writing is a discipline. You have to commit to it daily. It’s like exercise,
there are some days you don’t want to do it, and then other
days you are excited about it -- but if you will write a page per day
you will complete a pretty nice size book in less than a year.”

Perry Noble, Author of Overwhelmed and Unleash! Senior Pastor of
NewSpring Church

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7/23/15 11:10 A
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I have been journalling for yers. Some days just thought, etc, but when going back a few years and reading a months worth it makes for interesting reading

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7/4/15 8:06 P

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Someone was careless:

In "Deserves to Die" by Lisa Jackson, page 147, a character thinks to herself that she is a "damn good corporate attorney" but on page 201 a detective describes her as "...a consultant. An engineer. Worked with road crews."

So, was she an attorney or an engineer? Guess we'll never know.

Lou

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6/22/15 6:56 P

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6/18/15 3:25 P

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Good source of writing information:

www.creativity-portal.com/howto/writ
in
g/writing.html


Lou

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6/6/15 7:53 A

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"Under the weather" is to be unwell. In the old days, when a sailor was unwell, he was sent down below to help his recovery, under the deck, and away from the weather.

Lou

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5/31/15 8:51 P

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More proofreading humor. It continues to frustrate me that so many errors are made in so many books today, and the authors praise their editors. Here are more examples:

One latest read was "The Bone Seeker" by M.J. McGrath.

* ...and rested her hand on her hips. (So, one hand rests on both hips?)

* ...sat by himself on an old La-Z-Boy staring at an NFL game between the Maple Leafs and the Jets.

(NFL = National Football League. The Toronto Maple Leafs are a hockey team in the NHL = National Hockey League. The NY Jets are a football team.)

* She sat on the floor and bedded in. (Say what? What does that mean?)

* The questions she wanted answering were... (Instead of answered.)

* ...sparked up the engine.
* ...keyed the engine.
* ...keyed on the engine

(Instead of being cute so often with the engine terms -- about a dozen of these) it would have been much less distracting if she cut these out and didn't feel a need to explain everytime an engine was started.)

* Pulled a face

(Huh? A common usage among popular mystery writers today instead of made a face or grimaced or had a look of doubt, etc., on someone's face but what does it mean to 'pull' a face?)

Lou

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LEIGH_AUDRA's Photo LEIGH_AUDRA SparkPoints: (36,406)
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5/29/15 10:55 A

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Thanks. One of my biggest problems is when I have a scene in my head, but I can't find the words to get it down. So I just walk away for awhile, work on something else, and then it comes flowing. I've never liked anything I've written were I forced it out and not just let it flow.

Edited by: LEIGH_AUDRA at: 5/29/2015 (13:18)
Audra
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Ineresting information

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5/28/15 3:28 P

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Q: Where do we get the phrase, "Look before you leap?"

A: This phrase alludes to Aesop's fable about the fox who is unable to climb out of a well. He convinces a goat to jump in, climbs on the goat's horns to get out, while the goat remains trapped. Today it means "Think before you act."

Lou

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Q: Where does the phrase: "Everything but the kitchen sink" come from?

A: From 1944 WWII in armed forces slang, referenced intense bombardment. Out for blood, our Navy threw everything but the kitchen sink at Japanese vessels, warships and transports alike.

Lou

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1/31/15 6:44 P

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There is a Yahoo group that will keep you up-to-date on outlets seeking submission. Register with Yahoo for free then join the "Creative Writers Opportunities List" group. Best of success to you. emoticon -- Lou

Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 1/31/2015 (18:51)
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1/31/15 6:15 P

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Lots of writing tips here:

www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/

Lou

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12/3/14 4:17 P

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Programs for writing help:

killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/03
/w
rite-aids.html


Lou

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11/25/14 12:35 P

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Good resources:

killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/05
/c
rime-writing-resources.html


Lou

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11/17/14 4:16 A

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Great info share...Thank you!

You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face.

Mistakes are the portals of discovery.

Don't be afraid to give your best at what seemingly are small jobs. Every time you conquer one it makes you that much stronger. If you do the little jobs well, the big ones will tend to take care of themselves.

It is never too late to be what you might have been.


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Thank you for sharing this great info

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Thank you for sharing this great info

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11/14/14 11:38 A

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Good advice!
*******

The Kill Zone
Hey, Butt Out! I’m Reading Here©
Posted: 21 Apr 2014 12:30 AM PDT
by Robert Dugoni

[Note from Jodie: I'm going crazy with last-minute preparations for my big move across the country
in a few days, so bestselling thriller author and writing instructor Robert Dugoni is filling in for me today. Take it away, Bob!]

I raise more than a few eyebrows when I teach, and that’s usually a good sign. I know I’ve got my students thinking. The first collective class-eyebrow-arch comes when I stand up and say, “No one can teach you how to write.” Students who’ve paid good money to be in one of my seminars or workshops begin to have immediate heart palpitations until I add, “But I can teach you how to teach yourselves how to write.”

So what do I mean by this?

How can I teach any student I don’t know intimately what to write or how to write it? I can’t even teach my two children how to write. Writing is an extraordinarily personal endeavor and each of us brings our own nuances, quirks, insights and experiences to not only what we write but how we write it. All of these things form what we frequently refer to as the writer’s “voice” – how the writer (and really her characters) views the world and others in it and how the character expresses that view. We hope that it is a unique and exciting and interesting. When it is, those are usually the novels publishers clamor to buy.

But the fact is the to-be-published novel will never make it that far if the author forsakes the craft of writing and makes one of those silly mistakes that cry out “amateur” to that would-be editor.

So rather than telling students “I can teach you how to write,” I tell them my job is “to remove as many obstacles in the path to publication as possible.”

One of those big obstacles is when the author intrudes into the story.

Author intrusions into the reader’s experience reading a novel can be deadly. Not only do they raise the “amateur” flag and slow the story pace, they also tend to annoy. It’s like being in a deep and meaningful conversation with one person and having another person continually interrupt that conversation to tell you things you really don’t need to know at that moment or, frankly, you don’t care about!

When a story unfolds, the opening chapters should develop like a play on a stage. The reader wants to see what the character sees, hear what she hears, smell what she smells, taste what she tastes, and touch what she touches. It is not the author experiencing the story. It is the reader experiencing the story through the character. So how does the author intrude?

Let us count just some of the ways.

~ Omniscient narrative

This occurs when you’re reading a scene from a particular character’s point of view and suddenly the author barges in to provide a bit of information that the character doesn’t yet know, couldn’t yet know and may never know. Sometimes this is called bad foreshadowing. Here’s an example:

You’ve just written a killer scene in which your protagonist has arrived at a mountain getaway for three days of R&R and the author ends the scene with something like, “Little did she know that three miles away, Luke Reddinger, a serial killer, had just escaped from the state penitentiary.” Okay, so if the character didn’t know, who’s throwing in this tidbit? Does the reader need it at that moment? Would it be more powerful to see Luke Reddinger escaping, or running through the woods, maybe seeing the cabin she has arrived at? Wouldn’t that raise a story question that would keep the reader reading to find out what happens? Isn’t that what every writer wants?

~ Unnecessary biographical information

Ever read a scene in a book that is going swimmingly when suddenly the author stops the flow of the dialogue and action to tell you where the main character went to high school, their major in college or that their great grandmother was an alcoholic? Unless that high school is going to play a part in the story, the major is important to illustrate the character’s skill, or grandma is a serial killer when she gets drunk, what was the point of interrupting the story? Biographical sketches, if you’re so inclined to do them, are for the author to get to know her characters so the author better understands how the character will act and what she might say in a particular situation or moment. They are not for the reader.

~ Author Opinions

Nothing is more transparent than when an author tries to ram her opinion on a topic down your throat. Even when the author tries to disguise the opinion as a “character’s opinion” it is usually easy to spot. “Mary asked John what he thought about President Obama’s health care reform.” And then John starts spouting off. This is one of those instances where the author would be better off showing rather than telling. If you want to make a statement about the death penalty, write The Green Mile and let us see one of the pitfalls of the ultimate punishment. You want to write about abortion, write The Cider House Rules. You want to write on the evils of slavery, write Twelve Years a Slave. Racism in the south – Mississippi Burning. Greed in the roaring twenties – The Great Gatsby. There’s no place like home – The Wizard of Oz. And so on…

~ Flashbacks

This is usually the cause of the third collective class-eyebrow-arch. Some even snap at this point. Why? Because so many of us use flashbacks in our novels. So before anyone snaps an eyebrow, let me clarify – flashbacks can be used. The author just needs to know how to use them so they are not an intrusion. First, a flashback, despite its name, must still move the story forward. That is, the flashback should impart some information that is relevant to the plot at that moment, drives the plot forward, and/or reveals some important character trait or relationship that will come into play.

Second, a flashback is a scene. Therefore, all of the things discussed above that go into making a great scene still apply. A flashback should not be some character sitting alone at a table reminiscing about something that happened in the past. Put the reader in the scene with the characters and allow the reader to hear and see and smell and taste and touch the scene as it unfolds.

Think about the movie Titanic. Regardless of your opinion on the movie itself, note that it was actually Rose reminiscing about her voyage on that ship. How boring would it have been if the entire three-hour movie was Rose sitting at a table telling the movie audience what happened, rather than the movie audience flashing back to that time and getting the chance to experience it?

~ Information Dumps

This is usually where the writer has done a lot of research on a particular subject and darn it, everyone is going to know it! An information dump is an excessive amount of unnecessary information or details dumped into the story when the character does not need it and might never need it. Like biographies, research is for the author, not the reader. I’d say less than 10% of the information I research and learn about goes into my novels.

Information dumps can take many forms.

Research details. The research dump is when the author has learned a lot of information on a particular subject and dumps it into the story either in omniscient narrative or thinly disguised by creating a “character” to tell the reader everything they needed to know about such things as growing vegetables on rooftop gardens in New York City during the depression.

Character descriptions. Other information dumps are excessive details about what every character who comes on stage is wearing, or looks like. What the character is wearing is only important if the author has set the scene up so that another character has a particular interest in what a particular character is wearing, or the character’s own choice of clothes is important. When your character walks into a high school prom we can assume the girls are wearing prom dresses and the guys are in tuxedos. But if you’ve set the story up so that Billy is determined to make a splash and wears a tear-away tuxedo intending to leave high school by doing the Full Monty, then we want to know the details of that tear-away tuxedo.

Setting. The same is true with excessive details to describe a setting. Authors are not weather men or travel guides so your scenes shouldn’t read like a weather report or travel book. And if your protagonist is running for her life through a forest while being chased by werewolves, please don’t have her take the time to tell us every species of tree and type of fauna they are running past. Necessary details only. Excessive details need not apply!

So when you have the urge to pontificate, opine, brag, or otherwise bore, think about what my friend and brilliant writer John Hough Jr always says: “Dialogue is action and action is dialogue.” Get your characters on the move and talking. Avoid staying too long in a character’s head. Do your biographies and research for you, not for the reader, and give us only those details that will keep the story moving forward.

And above all, once you’ve hooked us with an incredible opening, lured us in with an amazing character, and mesmerized us with a killer plot, then please, BUTT OUT! I’ll thank you to let me enjoy your beautifully crafted story on my own.

Robert Dugoni is the critically acclaimed and New York Times Best Selling Author of the David Sloane series, The Jury Master, Wrongful Death, Bodily Harm, Murder One and The Conviction. He is also the author of the best-selling stand-alone novel Damage Control, as well as the nonfiction expose, The Cyanide Canary. Dugoni’s books have been likened to Scott Turow and Nelson DeMille, and he has been hailed as “the undisputed king of the legal thriller” by The Providence Journal and called the “heir to Grisham’s literary throne.” Bodily Harm and Murder One were each chosen one of the top 5 thrillers of 2010 and 2011, respectively. Murder One was also a finalist for the Harper Lee Award for literary excellence. My Sister’s Grave is the first in the Tracy Crosswhite series. Visit his website at www.robertdugoni.com, email him at bob@robertdugoni.com, and follow him on Twitter @robertdugoni and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/AuthorRobertDugoni.

Lou

Experienced Editor/Published Writer


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