Group photo
Author:
CKAYTHOMAS's Photo CKAYTHOMAS SparkPoints: (326,202)
Fitness Minutes: (169,386)
Posts: 11,613
7/8/12 6:40 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I also heard that raising your arm above your head (on the side where you have the pain) really helps.

Love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your srength and all your might. Love your neighbor as yourself.


 current weight: 141.4 
164
158.35
152.7
147.05
141.4
SUZETHD's Photo SUZETHD SparkPoints: (74,166)
Fitness Minutes: (41,127)
Posts: 31
7/3/12 10:37 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Great info! Thanks for sharing!

I get side stitches occasionally. Last time I got one, my friend looked at me like I was nuts and had no clue what I was talking about. I KNEW I wasn't crazy, but still. Guess I'll try to focus on deep breathing more often, even when not running. If I can make it an involuntary habit, perhaps it'll help on the runs.



 Pounds lost: 0.0 
0
22.35
44.7
67.05
89.4
SONSHINESUSAN Posts: 456
6/25/12 7:34 A

Send Private Message
Reply


You're welcome!!!

My breathing is TOTALLY off. I hope I can get that under control easily. It seems like something that should be so natural to do!!

 current weight: 166.1 
171
164.5
158
151.5
145
DMKOEP's Photo DMKOEP Posts: 1,894
6/24/12 10:28 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
That is great information! Thanks for sharing...

 current weight: 197.9 
223
204.75
186.5
168.25
150
SWAN47's Photo SWAN47 Posts: 5,864
6/23/12 9:05 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
emoticon for the information. I tend to be a deep breather so maybe that has helped me avoid it! Wishing you the best in your runs... emoticon

 current weight: 152.2 
160
155
150
145
140
SONSHINESUSAN Posts: 456
6/23/12 8:59 P

Send Private Message
Reply

Here's what I found:WHAT CAUSES A SIDE STITCH?

Side stitches are a muscle spasm of the "diaphragm". The diaphragm is a dome shaped muscle that separates the chest cavity from the abdominal cavity. In essence, it provides a boundary between the organs of the abdomen and the chest cavity where the heart and lungs are located.

The diaphragm assists in breathing. When we inhale, taking air into the lungs, the diaphragm moves down. When we exhale, the diaphragm moves up. (This detail, it becomes important later.)

Spasms of the diaphragm occur because of the movement of the internal organs as they jounce up and down while running, thus pulling down and straining the diaphragm as it moves up while exhaling.

The liver in particular is usually the cause of this. It is attached to the diaphragm by two ligaments. The liver is the largest organ in the abdominal cavity and is situated in the upper right abdomen. Hence most people experience stitches on their right side, immediately below the ribs. A stomach full of food may cause this as well.

In addition, most runners are "footed". They begin and end a respiratory cycle on the same foot while running, usually in a stride to breathing ratio of 4:1 while jogging and 2:1 while running very fast. As the runner's breathing then becomes synchronized with his/her stride, exhalation consistently occurs on the same leg. If one repeatedly exhales (causing the diaphragm to move up) when the right foot hits the ground (forcing the organs on the right side of the body to move down), a side stitch may develop.

HOW CAN I PREVENT A SIDE STITCH?

The most effective way to prevent a side stitch is to avoid "shallow" breathing. Shallow breathing can be defined as taking in a small volume of air with each breath, using only a small portion of the total lung capacity. When this occurs while running, the diaphragm remains in a consistently high position and never lowers enough to allow the connective ligaments of the liver to relax. The diaphragm becomes stressed and a spasm or "stitch" results.

Instead, one should breathe "deeply", also known as "belly breathing" while running. This allows the diaphragm to fully lower and reduce the stress on it.

Here's an exercise to try. Lie down on the floor, place a hand on your belly and breathe deeply. You are belly breathing correctly if you feel your hand raise slightly. If only your chest moves up, you are not breathing deep enough.

A technique that is very successful in preventing side stitches while running, is to periodically "purse" the lips while exhaling, as if blowing out the candles on a birthday cake. Again, deep breathing is required to be effective. (This works best for me as well as most of the runner's I work with.)

Another technique that helps, is to exhale as the left foot strikes the ground, instead of the right foot. The organs attached to the diaphragm on the left side of the body aren't as big as those on the right side, so there is less strain on the diaphragm.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS

Running downhill exacerbates side stitches since it increases the forces exerted on the entire body with each foot plant. Novice runners should walk down hills until breathing techniques are mastered.

Don't eat within one hour of running and only eat lightly within three hours of running. DO DRINK FLUIDS!!! The stomach drains fluids rather quickly. Dehydration is one of the most common causes of fatigue and should be avoided.

Preventing a side stitch using the above techniques is preferred. If you get a stitch while running try the "purse" method (blowing out the birthday candles). If the stitch continues, it is best to stop running and instead walk while concentrating on deep breathing. Continue running after the stitch goes away.



 current weight: 166.1 
171
164.5
158
151.5
145
SWAN47's Photo SWAN47 Posts: 5,864
6/23/12 8:52 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I've never had that. I would google it and see what causes it and what you can do to prevent it. Good luck. I hope it doesn't happen again to you.... emoticon

 current weight: 152.2 
160
155
150
145
140
SONSHINESUSAN Posts: 456
6/23/12 8:01 P

Send Private Message
Reply


I ran today and the one thing that stopped me from doing great was that from my third minute in, I developed a side stitch that even went up to my shoulder blade. Wow, it's hard to run through one of those! I stopped and walked, but as soon as I started running again the same thing happened.

Is there anything you can do to prevent a stitch? Do you just bear the pain and keep running? Can you hurt yourself if you ignore it?

thanks in advance, Sue

 current weight: 166.1 
171
164.5
158
151.5
145
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Couch to 5K Group General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics:
Last Post:



Thread URL: https://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x788x48659606

Review our Community Guidelines