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KAYOTIC's Photo KAYOTIC Posts: 15,623
9/22/11 10:39 P

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ABC...I guess that depends on what other resources you have to train. Your trip is a ways off, so I guess you're looking to be as fit as you can when you get there, and it's probably never to early to start building endurance. I'd shoot for at least 4 days of cardio of some sore and 2 days of resistance training a week, and give yourself at least one rest day. As far as your choices, whatever you enjoy that gets your heart rate up and you will do consistently, and possibly something that you can interval train in once a week.

You may want to pattern something like marathon training, there is a good program at marathontrainingacademy.com that I've been following for my half marathon training. It's 3 days of running, one easy, one hills or tempo and one long run, along with two or three days of cross training and 1 or 2 days of rest.

Since you'll be hiking you could substitute the long run for a long hike. the easy run could be a shorter hike, or if you can't get to a trail, a walk or run in the neighbor hood, or on a treadmill or step mill if you have access to that type of machine. Elliptical would probably work too. You could do tempo/hill on trails or treadmill.

Resistance training also is variable, I have some DVD's I like to do, and just joined a gym so I could get back into training with a trainer, because I find I'm more consistent that way. But again do whatever resistance training you have access to, for hiking, I've found single leg exercises are good, if you have hand weights at home you can look at the Spark videos or exercise tracker to find lots of ideas. Some I think are good for this area are squats, lunges, step ups. Don't neglect your upper body, again lots of ideas on Spark or if you have a gym I'm sure there are machines there you can use.

Let me know if you have more specific questions, but that would by my general overview/advice based on your question.

and What a trip! Have fun!

highest weight ever:202, SP starting weight: 143

H: 5''4" 53 y.o.

"Don''t let yesterday use up too much of today." Will Rogers

"Eat Food, Not Too Much, Mostly Plants" Michael Pollan



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ABCDHAK's Photo ABCDHAK SparkPoints: (0)
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9/22/11 1:55 P

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Hi folks!

I'm planning to celebrate a major birthday in 2 years by a 7 day hiking trip around Mont Blanc. It doesn't say how many miles a day but does mention 5-6 hours of hiking with " significant" elevation gain each day. I can do a 5 mi, 3000 elevation hike right now though it'll wear me out. What can I do to train up? Especially since I can't make it out to a hiking trail most weeks (small kids, over-worked hubby)

I'd appreciate all your advice! emoticon

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LYNDALOVES2HIKE's Photo LYNDALOVES2HIKE Posts: 38,258
9/8/11 12:08 P

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Wow, what an exciting accomplishment just to get out there - don't worry about being slow at this point!!

Even when I was at the peak of my hiking speed and strength, I noticed a dramatic slowing effect above 12k and the higher I would get, the slower I got - above 13k, it seemed like I was taking a break to catch my breath every 10 steps [exaggeration - it just FELT like every 10 steps!]. Now that I'm older, I am even more aware of the effects of elevation and start to feel sluggish considerably below 12k. Since I live at low elevation, I can notice the difference even at 5k and when I get to 8k, I can REALLY feel it.

I think getting thoroughly acclimated to the elevation before heading out is the best strategy, along with the other suggestions about reducing pack weight, etc. It all depends on what elevation you spend most of your time but the 'rule of thumb' is that it takes 3-6 weeks to fully adjust from sea level to 8,000 ft elevation, even longer for elevations higher than that. Obviously it's not very practical to 'move' to higher elevation for 3 weeks to prepare for a 14er but assuming you live considerably above sea level, spend as much time as you can increasing your elevation tolerance - the fact that you were starting to feel a little altitude sickness is a huge clue that you weren't acclimated properly.

Of course, you probably know to drink water, much more water than you think you 'need' - and if possible, spend at least one night before the hike at a higher elevation. I live somewhat near the coast at 600 ft elevation so I would personally have to plan for a 14er over a number of months, gradually increasing my elevation acclimatization - In the past, I've found that hiking at 5k-6k for a few weekends, then 7k-8k, etc, prepares me for ascents above 10k. I don't really have any 'convenient' peaks above 10k in my area so if I plan a backpack or hike at that level, I would definitely spend at least one night above 7k immediately before heading out. If I get into elevation above 5k-6k several times a week, it seems to stick with me - if I stay at lower elevation for a couple of weeks, I seem to lose all my prior acclimation and have to somewhat start over.

Some people take medication to help them adjust - I haven't done that but know lots of climbers who do and I might consider it if I start hiking in higher places again.

Good luck - wish I could be out there with you!


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Lynda in Orange County, So Calif

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God Grant me Serenity to Accept the things I cannot change, Courage to Change the things I can and Wisdom to Know the difference!

Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out. -- John Wooden

"Winners are not those who never fail, but those who never quit."
ANDERFELKERSON's Photo ANDERFELKERSON SparkPoints: (0)
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8/28/11 1:09 P

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Hi, I'm new......my longest and hardest hike was Mt Elbert in Colorado. 14er and I am a slow hiker too and it took me 11 hours start to finish. That was last summer. This summer with the Rookie 5K training program under my belt I am a stronger hiker....but no 14ers this year yet. Soon.

GO HIKERS!!!! emoticon



Michelle
Northern Colorado
"Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure"--N. Mandela


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KAYOTIC's Photo KAYOTIC Posts: 15,623
8/28/11 10:49 A

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Checked out the blog, nice pics!

When climbing/hiking at altitude, you really aren't going to be able to go fast, so just take that in stride, I think the best you can do is keep moving slowly toward the summit. Poles might help, as you can use your upper body to do some of the work, especially on steeper sections, and if you should encounter snow they are really handy.

In the blog you mentioned your pack weight, lowering that would help you with the pace as you wouldn't be so weighted down but you will still need to bring those essentials, especially water (or a filter if there are water sources along your trail) You may also look at your boots, lightening those may help as well, especially if they are heavy, you do want support, but heavy shoes will make a long hard hike feel longer and harder.

If you're looking for training ideas, I'd suggest a day of interval training for speed, and/or an incline training (hills or treadmill) to help on those steeper sections.

highest weight ever:202, SP starting weight: 143

H: 5''4" 53 y.o.

"Don''t let yesterday use up too much of today." Will Rogers

"Eat Food, Not Too Much, Mostly Plants" Michael Pollan



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JRIMM4's Photo JRIMM4 SparkPoints: (25,451)
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8/26/11 9:31 P

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This past Saturday I attempted my first 14er. My daughter went with me to hike up Mt. Yale outside of Buena Vista Colorado. This trip really put some things into perspective for me! We were absolutelly the slowest people on the trail and let me tell ya, 9 hours is a whole lotta hiking!!!

Any suggestions on the best way to increase pace? One thing for certain I've got to get a little quicker before I try one of these again.

If anyones interested I have pictures and reflections posted on my blog.
https://www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public
_journal_individual.asp?blog_id=4450285

JR

I am strong and I can climb mountains!


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