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DBELLE39's Photo DBELLE39 SparkPoints: (277,760)
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1/20/15 7:35 A

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My dr wants mine @ 6 so I have work to do, right now it's 9.1

Donna B.

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CROYLE55 Posts: 1,456
1/20/15 2:17 A

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I want mine down below 4. But if it stays in the 5's I will be happy with that.

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1CRAZYDOG's Photo 1CRAZYDOG Posts: 426,600
1/19/15 6:03 P

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Quite agree that the A1C is a more accurate picture of what your blood sugars are dong.

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MRSKATEDUVALL's Photo MRSKATEDUVALL Posts: 2,199
1/19/15 5:59 P

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Mine was 6, and I was pretty happy with that.. control slipped, I went off metformin for side effect reasons and my A1C shot to 9. I am hoping for better numbers, but I really need to get my daily fasting down.

LITTLEWIND53's Photo LITTLEWIND53 Posts: 17,178
1/19/15 5:55 P

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Considering that BG monitors can be off by as much as 20 percent, I use the daily finger tests ONLY as a guideline......

The A1C may vary a bit by lab but if I use the same lab each time, it is a much better indication of how well I am managing my numbers over 2 to 3 months. I would never relegate it to "only an average".

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1CRAZYDOG's Photo 1CRAZYDOG Posts: 426,600
1/19/15 2:27 P

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Yes, I would ideally like to be @ 5.0, but I don't think, for me, any lower would work. But never say never, right!?!

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HOUNDLOVER1's Photo HOUNDLOVER1 Posts: 8,869
1/19/15 12:39 P

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My doctor believes that the lower it is the better, ideally in the 4's. My personal goal is to get at least down to 5.0
I found that it makes a difference which lab does the test, as much as 0.5 so I don't rely on A1c as much as on daily testing. It is only an average.
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CAPECODLIGHT's Photo CAPECODLIGHT Posts: 3,443
1/19/15 12:22 P

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Stellar #'s CrazyDog and Croyless! My doc said she'd be happy with anything under 6.5. I sometimes hit in the high 5's, but so far have not sustained that time over time. Something to work on.



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1CRAZYDOG's Photo 1CRAZYDOG Posts: 426,600
1/19/15 8:45 A

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We're both happy w/the current 5.2 A1C

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CROYLE55 Posts: 1,456
1/19/15 1:44 A

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What AlC goal does your doctor want for you? Mine is 5.5

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CROYLE55 Posts: 1,456
1/19/15 1:43 A

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The ABCs of an A1C Test: A Big-Picture Look at Diabetes Control
By Everyday Health Guest Contributor
Published Jan 6, 2015

Jo-Anne Rizzotto 172By Jo-Anne M. Rizzotto, MEd, RD, LDN,CDE, Special to Everyday Health

If you are talking with someone about diabetes, you may hear the term ďA1C.Ē But what exactly does A1C mean? And why is your A1C important for diabetes management?

The A1C, otherwise known as a glycohemoglobin or hemoglobin A1C test, provides a picture of your average blood glucose control for the two to three months before you take the test. The A1C measures the glucose that clings to hemoglobin molecules in your red blood cells. The higher the glucose levels in your blood, the more glucose clings to the hemoglobin, and thus the higher your A1C level will be. Red blood cells are renewed every 120 days. By measuring the percentage of hemoglobin molecules that have glucose attached to them, healthcare providers can see how much extra glucose you have had in your bloodstream over the past few months.

The A1C test is done every three to six months, often during a regular diabetes care visit. It does not require fasting, can be done any time of day, and requires only a small sample of blood taken from a finger stick or drawn from your arm.

How to Use Your A1C Results to Manage Your Diabetes
Why is the A1C test essential for diabetes management? It gives you an overall picture of your diabetes, rather than a reflection of what is happening in one day, and helps you evaluate your diabetes care and make changes.

An A1C test can help you manage your diabetes by:

verifying self-testing or other blood test results with your healthcare provider
determining whether your treatment plan is working
demonstrating how healthy food choices and being physically active affect diabetes control
An A1C reading of less than 7 percent may be a good goal for many people, but make sure to ask your provider what your A1C target should be. Itís helpful to remember that the closer you get to your goal, the better youíll feel today and tomorrow. According to Joslin Diabetes Centerís Clinical Guidelines, we recommend that patients aim for an A1C value of less than 7 percent, as long as achieving this goal does not increase your risk for developing low blood glucose (or blood sugar), otherwise known as hypoglycemia. The best way to determine your target A1C is to speak with your healthcare provider.

The higher your A1C, the greater your risk for developing complications, such as heart attacks, strokes, kidney disease, and neuropathy and circulation problems. To help lower your risk for diabetes complications, keep your blood glucose levels in your target range by self-monitoring and making adjustments with medicine (insulin, pills, or both), meal planning, and scheduled physical activity.

Jo-Anne M. Rizzotto, MEd, RD, LDN,CDE is a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator and Director of Educational Services at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. She earned a BS in Food and Nutrition from SimmonsCollege in Boston, and an MEd in Instructional Design from the University of Massachusetts. She manages an educator staff of 14 professionals including nurses, dietitians, and exercise physiologists.

Posted in: Type 2 Diabetes

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