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11/10/16 2:56 P

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Armed and Fabulous: The Secret to Toned Arms

Our guide to sculpting strong shoulders, biceps, and triceps will have you going sleeveless way into sweater season. Because really, why hide those guns?
By Janet Lee

How to Get Rid of Arm Flab
Here's a quick question: Whose arms do you covet? Rihanna's or Madonna's? Gisele Bündchen's or Michelle Obama's? Whether your aesthetic is model thin or athletic, there's no arguing that arms are the ultimate barometer of buffness. They immediately let people know "I'm fit!" or "I haven't lifted more than a tub of ice cream in months." And unlike your abs and thighs, which make peekaboo appearances only in hot weather, your arms have to be ready for their close-up pretty much year-round.

The tricky part is that there's no consensus on what level of perfection we should be reaching for. According to data from a national survey, the average woman over age 18 has an upper-arm circumference (typically measured around the biggest part of the biceps) of just less than 12 1/4 inches. But that girth doesn't take into account firmness versus flab. And the truth is, studies of upper-body strength showed that women tend to neglect doing the toning that would add muscle to that mix.

If you're like me, you probably have a short list of go-to exercises you've used since college to sculpt your arms and shoulders. A few curls, some kick backs, maybe some overhead presses. I've gotten by — even received compliments — with this repertoire, but I've recently discovered that arms are not so easily tamed. The upper arms and the shoulders have no fewer than nine primary muscles that require some serious firming if you want to make the sort of sleeveless impact you see on the red carpet.

Even if you're the type who would rather sit through a Jersey Shore marathon than grab a dumbbell, the science and sets here will make you drop the remote. These proven strategies and exercises make strong, sexy arms finally attainable. So attainable, in fact, that our plan took up to an inch and a quarter off our testers' arm measurements while building muscle-carving strength that you can see, all without dieting. If you're tired of envying other women's arms while covering your own, get ready to roll up your sleeves.



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11/8/16 3:52 P

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Good posture not only gives you the look of poise and confidence, but it helps you feel better too. Try out these six yoga moves to feel great and look longer and leaner in minutes.

Chaturanga
Start in plank pose. Reach back through heels, engage navel to spine, and soften through elbows, reaching them straight back until forearms graze the sides of ribcage.
Find your long spine, and keep a slight chin tuck. Breathe here for 5 to 10 deep breaths



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10/31/16 3:20 P

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The 20-Minute Strength Training Workout That Will Turn Your Body to Jell-O
Think a good strength workout takes hours in the gym? This 20-minute total-body burnout will prove you wrong. Very wrong.

By Lauren Mazzo



This full-body beat down comes to you courtesy of NYC trainer Courtney Paul (you might recognize him from Bravo's reality show Work Out New York or our Trainer Talk video series where he answers your burning fitness questions, like how to get a toned butt). He's known for packing a tough strength-training workout in with just some dumbbells and a bench—and this workout that the #ShapeSquad did on Facebook Live was no exception. Even if you missed it in real time, you can join in for some of the sweaty fun.

How it works: Grab some dumbbells (a pair of challenging weights, and some lighter ones in case you need to swap). Follow along with Courtney in the video and your arms and legs will be feeling like Jell-O in record time.

Warm-Up
Hand Walk
A. Stand with feet wider than hip-width apart. Bend knees to place hands on floor. Take three steps forward with hands until in high plank position.
B. Take three steps backward with hands to return to feet, and stand tall. After 30 seconds, add an elbow plank after crawling out to the high plank position. Continue for another 30 seconds.

Push-Ups
A. Keeping core tight and hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, lower your body to the floor so your chest grazes the ground.
B. Push back up to high plank position. Continue for 30 seconds.

Triceps Dips
A. Start by sitting on the edge of a bench or chair, hands on the edge, fingers facing your body. Keeping shoulders back, engage core and upper body to lift butt off chair/bench.
B. Inhale and slowly bend your elbows at least 90 degrees. Pause, then exhale and straighten your arms back to starting position. Keep chin parallel to the ground. Continue for 30 seconds.

1A. Biceps Hammer Curl with Lunge
A. Hold a pair dumbbells by sides. Curl them up to shoulders, palms facing in, then slowly lower back to starting position.
B. Step forward into a lunge with the right foot so that both knees form 90-degree angles.
C. Hold the lunge, and perform another biceps curl. Push off right leg to come back to starting position. Continue for 30 seconds.

1B. Lunge Hold with Curl and Press
A. Holding the right leg lunge, curl dumbbells toward shoulders, palms facing in.
B. Press dumbbells overhead until elbows are by ears, keeping palms facing in. Slowly reverse the movement. Continue for 30 seconds.

1C. Triceps Dips with Weight
A. Perform triceps dips as described above, but holding one dumbbell vertically between knees. Continue for 30 seconds, then hold the lower position and pulse for 30 seconds.

Repeat exercises 1A and 1B on the left side.

2A. Skull Crusher
A. Lie faceup on a bench or the floor, holding dumbbells directly above shoulders, palms facing in.
B. Inhale and bend elbows to 90 degrees, lowering dumbbells over face. Exhale and squeeze triceps to bring dumbbells back to starting position. Make sure elbows stay directly over shoulders. Continue for 30 seconds.

2B. Skull Crusher to Shoulder Press
A. Perform three skull crushers, then hold weights in toward chest, and crunch torso up to sitting.
B. Stand up and perform three shoulder presses. Squat down and sit on the bench to repeat. Continue for 30 seconds.

3. Chest Press
A. Lie faceup on bench or floor, holding dumbbells directly above shoulders, palms facing toward feet.
B. Inhale and lower dumbbells to chest, elbows going wide, forming a 90-degree angle between forearm and biceps. Exhale and press dumbbells back to starting position.
C. After 30 seconds, hold left weight over chest. Perform two presses only on the right side, then one press with both hands. Continue for 15 seconds, then hold both arms at the bottom of the movement and pulse for 10 seconds.
D. Repeat on the opposite site, performing single-arm presses with the left arm. Continue for 15 seconds, then hold both arms and the bottom of the movement and pulse for 10 seconds.

4. Standard Biceps Curl
A. Sit on the edge of a bench or chair, holding dumbbells by sides with palms facing forward.
B. Curl dumbbells toward shoulders so that palms are facing shoulders at the top.
C. Continue for 10 seconds, then hold at the top for 10 seconds. Repeat three more times.

5A. Right-Side Triceps Kickback
A. Start by standing over bench or chair with one foot on either side, dumbbell in right hand, palm facing in. Hinge at the hips and place left hand on bench, keeping core tight, back straight, and shoulders and hips square. Pull right elbow up so that triceps is parallel to the floor.
B. Keeping upper arm stationary, exhale and squeeze triceps to lift the weight until the arm is fully extended and weight points toward ceiling. Hold for one second, then inhale and lower back to starting position. Continue for 30 seconds, then hold in an extended position for 5 seconds.

5B. Overhead Triceps Extension
A. Stand with feet hip-width apart, holding dumbbell in right hand directly overhead, palm facing in. Keep core tight and chin parallel to the floor.
B. Inhale and slowly lower the dumbbell behind head, keeping upper arm stationary and elbow pointed toward the ceiling.
C. Exhale and squeeze triceps to raise dumbbell back to starting position. Continue for 30 seconds.

5C. One-Arm Shoulder Press with Squat
A. Stand with feet hip-width apart, holding dumbbell in right hand with upper arm parallel to the floor and forearm forming a right angle with palm facing forward. Keep core tight and chin parallel to the floor.
B. Exhale and press dumbbell overhead so that wrist is directly over shoulder, palm still facing forward. Continue for 30 seconds.
C. Holding dumbbell in racked position next to right shoulder, squat down onto the bench or chair. Push through heels to stand, then perform a shoulder press. Continue for 30 seconds.

Repeat exercises 5A, 5B, and 5C on the left side.

Bonus Burnout: In-Out Squat Jumps
A. Start standing over the bench with one foot on either side. (No bench? Perform this same movement on the floor.)
B. Squat down to sit on the bench, then push through heels and explode up, jumping to land with feet together on top of bench.
C. Jump feet back down to either side of bench, and squat down to repeat.

Do AMRAP for 30 seconds. Then hold a squat for 10 seconds, and pulse. Do AMRAP in-out squat jumps for another 15 seconds.



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10/27/16 4:35 P

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These Detox and Recovery Waters Are Actually Worth the Hype
Trendy waters are all the rage, but how many of them really have health benefits? A dietitian investigates which ones to say "yes" and "no" to.

By Deborah Tagliareni MS RD


Yes: Watermelon Water
Watermelon water is more popular than ever, showing the best of the fruit with a high potassium content, lycopene, vitamin C, and of course, water. (Fun fact: Watermelon is 92 percent water.) All of these attributes make watermelon a healthy choice. And watermelon water is a close second if you don't have some slices handy. While sipping your new fave afternoon drink, keep in mind that it has 60 calories in 8 ounces. That can add up quickly if you're not paying attention.



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10/22/16 1:19 P

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Start stretching (or exercising) X minutes a day X days per week at home. Increase duration when it feels appropriate. (Mayo Clinic’s website has slides for 10 basic stretches.)



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10/21/16 3:39 P

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Maple-Walnut Pizza with Chicken Sausage
When you need to satisfy that sausage craving, opt for the chicken variety over pork to cut calories and fat. And make sure your cheese doesn't have less than 33 percent fat to avoid a rubbery texture and get that oh-so-gooey one.

Makes: 6 servings
Prep: 15 mins
Total Time: 35 mins


Ingredients
4 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon cornmeal
1 16-ounce ball whole-wheat pizza dough
1/2 cup very thinly sliced red onion
4 ounces sharp white cheddar (about 1 cup)
5 fully cooked breakfast-style chicken sausage links (such as Aidells), thinly sliced
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
2 tablespoons maple syrup
3 cups loosely packed field greens
Directions
Place an oven rack in the lowest position. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees . Brush a rimmed baking sheet with 2 teaspoons oil and sprinkle with cornmeal. Roll out dough to size of prepared baking sheet and transfer to sheet.
Brush remaining oil on dough and scatter onion, cheddar, sausage and walnuts over it.
Bake pizza until bottom is crisp and starting to brown and cheese is melted and bubbling, 13 to 17 minutes. Drizzle with maple syrup and top with field greens.
Nutrition Information
Servings Per Recipe: 6
PER SERVING: 386 cal., 18 g total fat (6 g sat. fat), 649 mg sodium, 42 g carb. (4 g fiber), 16 g pro.










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10/13/16 3:33 P

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Super-Simple (and Delicious) Salmon Recipes

These three salmon recipes will seriously upgrade your favorite healthy fish. The best part? They're incredibly easy, and there's a good chance you already have all the ingredients.

Salmon is a total seafood superfood. With 29 grams of protein per serving, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, and the antioxidant selenium, it's a clear winner to upgrade any meal. But cooking salmon can be crazy intimidating—or you can burn yourself out on boring fish dishes (and there's nothing like bad or blah to really turn you off from a food). We came up with three foolproof salmon recipes that you can prep in minutes, throw in the oven, and pull out, ready-to-eat.

The first, Honey-Soy Salmon, combines sweet, salty, and umami flavors and is done after being broiled for just 8 to 10 minutes. If you're hooked on that umami flavor or have no idea what it is, here are 5 ways to add more umami to your diet (and why you should). The second, Blackened Salmon, uses only spices to coat the fish with intense flavor—meaning you don't need to worry about added sugar or fat like in many other marinades. If you're on a mission for clean eating, this recipe is your best bet. The third, Maple Mustard Salmon, gets a kick of tangy flavor from spicy mustard and black pepper, mixed with the sweetness of maple syrup. While it might sound like a combo you'd never expect, think of it as a fancy adult twist on honey mustard (basically, delicious).



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10/4/16 3:11 P

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8 Things You Should Do If You Just Can’t Fall Asleep


CLASSPASS

Some nights you hit the sheets, and you just know your snooze will be lackluster. Maybe you’re nervous about your interview tomorrow or are still simmering about the unresolved argument you had with your significant other. Or maybe, you stayed up a little too late watching Supernatural reruns on Netflix.

But other nights, the reason you’re tossing and turning until 1 a.m. isn’t so clear. You woke up, went to work or school, worked up a sweat in class, came home, and only had one glass of vino (okay, maybe two). With a few mild differences here and there, it was like any other day. So why the struggle with sleep on this particular night?

“The biggest issue is that we don’t have a good separation between day and night anymore. We live in a 24/7 society, with work or electronics seeping into our home life at night,” says Shelby Harris, Psy.D., director of Behavioral Sleep Medicine at the Sleep-Wake Disorders Center, Montefiore Medical Center. “Sleep is thought of being an on/off switch, but sadly, it doesn’t work that way.”

What’s worse, Dr. Harris says, a lack of sleep doesn’t just result in morning grogginess or baggy eyes—it can dramatically affect your eating habits and overall health..

“When we sleep less, we have an increase in ghrelin, the hormone that makes us hungry, and a decrease in leptin, which tells us we’re full. As a result, we eat more because we don’t have a strong signal to stop,” she says. “In addition, sub-par sleep can lead to increased work errors, poor concentration and attention, increased absenteeism, poor motor skills, worse memory, increased stress and depression/anxiety.”

But there is some good news, sleeping beauties: Getting a good night’s sleep is 100 percent attainable with the right preparation. Here, Dr. Harris lists eight surefire tips for ensuring the time between hitting the sheets and getting shut-eye is as minimal as possible.

Skip those dated wives tales
Although it’s not entirely clear where this old wives’ tale originated (or counting sheep, for that matter), Dr. Harris says that liquids of any kind should be avoided once you hit the bed. “Have a tiny sip of water to get any medication down, but that’s it.”

Do your best to get up at a decent hour on the weekends
While you may look forward to snoozing past noon on the weekends, according to Dr. Harris, it’s also a quick way to disrupt your sleep schedule for the week. “Sleeping in on the weekends can make it hard to adjust to a regular, earlier bedtime on Sunday evening,” she explains. “You’re essentially creating jet lag in your body Friday through Sunday morning.”

Trouble getting motivated in the weekend’s wee hours? Try picking an early Saturday or Sunday class to attend with a friend (so you’ll have no excuse to bail).

Keep your bed for sleep and, er, maybe one other thing
“Use the bed only for sleep and sex,” says Dr. Harris. “Don’t lay in your bed if you’re not sleeping.” Of course, if you’re in a tiny studio or apartment and lacking in the furniture department, cozying up on a big, comfy couch before bed isn’t really an option. Consider investing in a space-efficient (but super plush) chair like a papasan or finding a nearby coffee shop to wind down at before coming home and hitting the sheets.

Make sure to exercise, but within a certain timeframe
Although it might be tempting to squeeze in a late-night sweat sesh after you’ve completed your chores for the day, Dr. Harris says it’s best to resist if you want a good night’s snooze. She recommends avoiding the gym within three hours of bed.

Of course, that doesn’t mean you still shouldn’t try to fit in a workout elsewhere. “Even 20 minutes of exercise four to six hours before bedtime can help you fall asleep faster.”

Put the phone down
“Most electronics emit blue light, which suppresses melatonin before bedtime,” explains Dr. Harris. “Melatonin is the ‘hormone of darkness’ and comes out in the evening to help induce sleepiness. When we are exposed to blue light within one to two hours before bedtime, we suppress melatonin and it becomes more difficult to fall asleep.”

Although you can still listen to music or audio books through your smartphone, Harris recommends turning the device over to ensure you’re not directly facing the snooze-killing blue light.

Stop checking your email
If you know you’re going to have a big day at work tomorrow, it can be tempting to start hacking away at emails before bed. But according to Dr. Harris, this is one of the biggest sleep offenders of all. “Prioritize! Not everything needs to get done before bed,” she stresses. “We’re often on our computers, phones and tablets just before bed, checking work emails and social media. This makes it difficult for our brains to wind down and relax.”

Resist the nap temptation
As heartbreaking as this piece of sleep advice sounds, according to Dr. Harris, it’s crucial if you’re finding yourself with too much energy in the late hours. “Avoid naps, especially if you have trouble sleeping,” she says. “Naps steal sleep from the night.”

Don’t force it
Just like that ill-fitting H&M dress that looked so much better on the hanger, when it comes to falling asleep at night, the best piece of advice is ultimately the simplest: Don’t force it.

“Don’t lay in bed if you can’t sleep,” says Dr. Harris. “Instead, get up after approximately 20 minutes (don’t watch the clock, just estimate) and do something quiet, calm and relaxing in dim light until you’re sleepy. Don’t try to force sleep to happen. The more you worry about it, the worse it will get.”



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10/3/16 2:08 P

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Whether you're a regular yogi or someone who struggles to remember to stretch, flexibility is a key component of a well-rounded fitness routine. So it's important to squeeze it in. That said, everyone's range differs. "Different people have different bone structures, so nobody is going to feel the same stretch the exact same way, and not everyone is going to naturally have the same range of motion and that's okay," says Tiffany Cruikshank, founder of Yoga Medicine and author of Meditate Your Weight. "The most important part is that you are taking the time to stretch, and that you maintain that sense of elasticity and pliability in the muscles." To see where you're at—and where you may need to focus your practice—go through these five tests that test flexibility from head to toe.

To Test Your: Hamstrings
Most people think it's best to test your hamstring flexibility while standing, but Cruikshank says doing so while lying on your back isolates the hamstrings so they don't get assistance from the hip flexors or spine. Start lying on your back with legs straight out. Lift one leg up into the air, then see how far you can reach up your leg while keeping your back and head on the floor. Cruikshank says it's best if you're at least able to touch your shins, and then work toward being able to touch your toes.

If you can't, grab a yoga strap to wrap around the base of your foot, and use the straps to help slowly guide you deeper into the stretch. Hold the stretch for 1 to 2 minutes on each side, practicing daily to help you become more comfortable in the position.

To Test Your: Hip Rotators
This is a big one for those who sit at a desk all day (so, a lot of us), as the external rotators of the hips become very tight—even more so if you add a regular running routine on top of it. Cruikshank says to start lying on your back, with your left foot on the ground and right ankle resting gently on top of the left knee. Lift your left leg up off the ground and try to reach for your hamstring or shin, bringing it in closer to your chest; you'll start to feel tension on the outside of your right hip. If you're unable to reach your hamstring, Cruikshank says that's a big indicator that your hips are really tight. To work on it, she suggests placing your left foot against a wall for support, finding a comfortable distance that allows you to feel tension without pain (which means the stretch is working).

To Test Your: Outer Hips and Spine
While Cruikshank says it's difficult to test your spinal flexibility on its own, you can give it a go if you double up with a hip test, too. (And who's going to say no to multitasking?) Lie on your back and bring both knees into the chest. Then, keeping your upper body flat on the ground—it may help to stretch your arms out to each side—slowly rotate both knees to one side, getting as close to the ground as possible. The goal is to be able to reach the same distance from the ground on both sides, otherwise it could indicate an imbalance.

As you lower down, if you feel more tension in the hips, that's your cue that the area is tight. You should focus on releasing tension in the area, says Cruikshank. Same goes if you feel it more in the spine (just remember to keep your back flat on the ground while you rotate your knees from side to side). As for how low you can go? "If you're nowhere near the ground, then that's something you need to work on for sure," says Cruikshank. "Find some pillows or blankets to support your legs while you settle into that position for a few minutes each day, gradually removing the support as you progress closer to the ground."

To Test Your: Shoulders
"This is an area where people get really tight, whether you're running, cycling, Spinning, or even lifting weights," says Cruikshank. "It's a significant limitation to be tight in the shoulders though, so it could be something you want to focus more attention on." To find out, start standing with feet together and arms down by your side. Bring your hands behind your back and aim to grab the opposite forearm. Cruikshank says you should be able to at least reach mid-forearm, though touching your elbows is even more ideal. Think about broadening your chest as you perform the stretch, or pushing your chest forward while keeping your abs tight and posture tall. "That way you're stretching the chest, arms, and shoulders, rather than just the arms alone," she says.

If you're unable to reach your forearms or clasp hands, Cruikshank suggests using a yoga strap or dish towel to assist you until you get closer to your goal. Practice it a few times each day, holding the stretch for 1 to 2 minutes each time.

To Test Your: Spine and Neck
"The neck and spine tend to get really tight nowadays, especially if you're a desk warrior and an athlete—posture isn't always kept at the forefront," says Cruikshank. From a seated cross-legged position, slowly rotate to one side and look behind you. How far around can you see? Cruikshank says you should be able to look 180 degrees, though it's not uncommon to find your limit is less than that due to tension in the neck. To help release that, practice this same stretch a few times throughout the day, even when you're in that desk chair (you can grab the sides or back of the chair for assistance). Just remember to keep your hips and pelvis facing forward, she says. "Your lower body shouldn't move; this is all about relaxing into the seated stretch with a neck twist to release where a lot of tension is held when we get stressed out."



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9/29/16 4:36 P

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Chicken is like the dinner version of a turkey sandwich—easy, reliable, and insanely boring if you eat it the same way every day. Whether you're a beginner in the kitchen or a budding chef, these chicken recipes will impress your taste buds without adding hours to dinner prep time or ruining your healthy eating plan. All three recipes use powerful herbs and spices that add flavor and can also have serious health benefits. The process is simple: Mix up the seasonings, coat the chicken, quickly grill or sauté at medium-high heat, and you can have each of these done in about 10 minutes flat.

Rosemary-Mustard Chicken gets some added flavor from white wine and parsley—so consider it perfect to impress dinner guests without spending all day slaving away at the stove. Whip up the Fajita-Spiced Chicken to use inside tacos or in a healthy chicken fajita bowl, or throw on some greens for a Southwest-inspired salad. The third recipe, Lemon-Herb Chicken, is flavored by olive oil and oregano, which have some secret health benefits: Just one teaspoon of oregano has the same amount of antioxidants as three cups of spinach, and olive oil is a great source of healthy fats. Toss those same seasonings onto a side of roasted vegetables and you have a perfectly paired meal. Bonus: Make extra, and you'll have ideal lunch-making material to upgrade a sad desk salad (try these 10 recipes with what you have left over).



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9/27/16 3:09 P

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NATHANIEL WELCH

About This Workout
If your routine isn't trimming the fat, here's what will. Trainer Shaun T, the brains and brawn behind the Insanity DVDs, gave us this exclusive sample from his latest set, Focus T25 — all-new 25-minute circuits every bit as butt-kicking as the hour-long ones that made him famous. "Anyone can do this workout," he promises. And with no tools needed, he's not having any excuses. You'll warm up with a minute of jacks and then complete the circuit twice nonstop, doing two cardio exercises before each abs move. "I make every minute count," he says, and you can bet your Spanx that his combo approach takes tummy tightening to the next level. Finish with a signature Shaun T "burnout" round of just the cardio moves — we'll mark them for you; you focus on crushing it. Fit in three sessions a week and you'll see the skinny happen in as little as two weeks. So killer, so quick, so done.



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9/26/16 11:59 A

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SHUTTERSTOCK

Why Healthy Fats Matter
Your body needs fat to function properly—to absorb vitamins, have energy, protect your organs, keep your hormones in check, and keep you satiated. It's true, however, that not all fats are created equal. Saturated and trans fats (found in meat, dairy, and many processed foods) raise your bad (LDL) cholesterol. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, on the other hand, help lower bad cholesterol, lower blood pressure, improve insulin sensitivity, and protect your heart. Specifically, omega-3 fatty acids, a type of polyunsaturated fat, can help improve good (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides. In fact, a study published just last week showed that middle-aged and older adults with type 2 diabetes who consumed 500mg of omega-3s per day (equivalent to two servings of fatty fish per week) had a 48 percent reduced risk of vision loss associated with diabetes.

Want to reap all the benefits of healthy fats? Ditch the fear of fat and add these six foods to your diet.



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9/24/16 12:45 P

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Do you struggle to open that pickle jar ever single time? Do you worry your handshake isn't exactly interview-ready? Well, you're not alone. According to one new study, people now have the weakest grip strength ever, or at least since these things have been studied. Ladies, it's time to get a grip—literally.

Hand strength probably isn't something you think about too often. After all, when's the last time you consciously trained your palms at the gym? Exactly. But perhaps you should be thinking about it more. Researchers found that millennial women ages 20 to 24 have significantly weaker hand grips than women tested in the mid 1980s, according to research published in the Journal of Hand Therapy.

You can thank the swipe-screen technology for that, said lead author Elizabeth Fain, Ph.D., of Winston-Salem State University. "As a society, we're no longer agricultural or manufacturing ... What we're doing more now is technology-related, especially for millennials," she says to NPR.

All of our swiping, pinching, texting, and thumb scrolling has previously been linked to other anatomical changes like alignment problems in the neck and spine and a hunched-over posture. (Not to mention injuries from things like falling into open manholes or car accidents caused by texting while driving.) So now your hands are suffering the ill effects too, with an influx of overuse injuries and even early onset arthritis.

But before you hop on Amazon to buy one of those weird grip tools that looks like a ThighMaster for your fingers, consider for a moment that unless you're a professional arm wrestler it's probably not a huge deal. The grip strength norms were put in place more than 30 years ago, so what's "normal" or "healthy" should be updated along with the times, added Fain.

Regardless of whether waning grip strength is actually a serious problem or just the way of the future, it wouldn't hurt your hands (or your brain or your eyes) to take a break from typing, clicking, and Candy Crushing for a bit. Want a killer grip without actually having to resort to gimmicky gadgets or callused hands? Try activities that require you to use your grip, like rock climbing, paddling, tennis, and jumping rope. (Get started with this 10-Minute Jump Rope Workout.)






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