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LADYZHERRA's Photo LADYZHERRA SparkPoints: (0)
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9/8/10 6:37 P

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Thanks for the reminder!

I used to teach adult literacy. It's very challenging and rewarding.

Celebrate!

Jenn

CorsetlessFitness.blogspot.com

- Leader of the LITERARY WOMEN team
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"Minds, like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled, ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort" (Dickens)


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SARAWALKS's Photo SARAWALKS Posts: 1,087
9/8/10 3:37 P

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What a great idea for a topic! I want to explore literacy training for adults once I retire.
My mother taught reading so well...but I thought I would not be good at teaching it, since I learned how to read so instinctively at age 4 & have had my nose in a book ever since.
But now I am rethinking that...maybe I could...

"Mind like parachute - only function when open!" Charlie Chan

“Words make you think a thought. Music makes you feel a feeling. A song makes you feel a thought.”
** E. Y. Harburg**


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CJWORDPLAY's Photo CJWORDPLAY Posts: 29,836
9/8/10 2:33 P

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Our library is having a festival today to celebrate INTERNATIONAL LITERACY DAY!I wanted to share this excerpt written by the literacy coordinator - who grew up in a home where her father could not read:


"While planning the library's hosting of an International Literacy Day celebration, the theme of which is "Literacy is Freedom," I read again and again about lives transformed by the ability to read. I thought about how close I came to growing up not reading in this country.

I missed a lot of school my first-grade year because of illness. When I returned, most of my classmates had begun the exciting process of reading -- without me. Like my father, I had friends who either did the reading activities for me or guided me step by step through matching the letters and words to pictures. The words made no sense to me at all. At 6, I already understood the shame of being the only one who doesn't get it. Even with an astute and caring teacher, my classmates and I surreptitiously kept me looking like "one of the kids who could read."

My story ends well. Alerted by my teacher, my mother began to work with me at home, and in the spring of that year, I read my first word, "airplane." This metaphor for flight, for taking wing, for liberation, would be my ticket to reading -- the activity that would transform my life. Unlike my father, I no longer felt the sting of not understanding those curious symbols on the page. Unlike my father, I was free."

This helped me get in touch with the gratitude I feel for being able to read. What joy and adventures reading has brought to me.

I'm wondering if any of you have "learning to read" stories you'd be willing to share?

CJ emoticon

CJ
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