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ANTIGONAKI's Photo ANTIGONAKI Posts: 840
4/21/14 11:15 A

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All things in moderation.

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TRIXIETEXAS's Photo TRIXIETEXAS Posts: 478
4/17/14 2:29 P

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I am a low carber so I am all for lamb! I am not that worried about making it lean, either. Approximately 60-65% of my diet comes from fat. 30-35% protein, and the rest carbs. I've lost 98 pounds this way so far so I see no reason to change!

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Christina


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JPAGGEO's Photo JPAGGEO Posts: 115
4/17/14 12:50 P

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There is no serious reason to not eat lamb. You will find that the nutritional value has to do with the cut of the lamb that you eat. The most lean cuts are the loin, shank and leg. These are said to be like beef and pork regarding calories and fat. So that means about 150-170 calories per 3 ounce service, with 2-3 grams of saturated fat.

Just like beef, some cuts like the blade and ground lamb can be 20 to 30 calories higher per serving than beef.

Lamb usually has less marbling than beef, so trimming the fat around the edges after cooking the lamb makes it much leaner.

But, it is also a big deal as to how the animal was raised. I know in the States cattle and lamb are fed grains to help them get fat, but as you have all seen in pictures of lambs grazing in the countryside - that their natural food is grass. I found out on Dr. Oz's site that one study showed that the animals that were feeding on grass in pastures can not only increase the nutritional quality of the meat but can also have up to a third of the fat of grain-fed lambs as well as having a good amount of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. I never ever knew that. Lamb as a source of omega-3 fatty acids? I thought that was only in fish and olive oil.

Now of course, how you prepare the lamb also makes a difference in it's nutritional information. As you would guess, if you grill, broil or roast the lamb, that tends to reduce the fat. If you fry the lamb - (what self-loving Greek would ever fry lamb?), but all the same - frying lamb will increase the fat. But anyway, ugh, fried lamb!! Seriously.

Of course, lamb should probably not be eaten more than once a week, as we all know that mostly plant-based diets are better for us. But, I am a carnivore and like to have meat on most dayσ, about 3-4 times a week, so it helps to know what is in the meat.

So, having said that, I wish you all a blessed Easter, and hope that we will all be roasting our lambs in the sunshine, with family, good friends and a bunch of green sides! Happy Easter. Χρόνα Πολλα!
P.S. Keep an eye out for my "Alternative Maryeritsa" soup, it's delicious without the intestines and innards. A good alternative for those who have never developed a taste for lamb organ meat.


Julie from Glyfada, Athens, Greece
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