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PLMITCH's Photo PLMITCH Posts: 13,534
6/20/16 10:13 A

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Yes train and run races with my 45/15 interval. Depending on the course, I may skip a walk interval, especially in the last mile of a race, or if I am on a hilly course and going down hill. In Delaware there aren't many hills (especially in Southern / Central Delaware), but when I ran in Central Park last weekend, I took full advantage of the hills!

Patrick
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SW = 287 (01/08/07)
1st Goal Weight = 210
(achieved 03/13/2012)
2nd Goal Weight = 199
(achieved 05/03/2012)
3rd Goal Weight = 187 [100 pounds lost since starting on SP]
(achieved 08/18/2012)
Final Goal Weight = 179
(achieved 02/21/2013)


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BFITZH2O SparkPoints: (116)
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6/20/16 9:37 A

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Thank you ! Do you train and race with the 45:15 ?

On a different topic, I homebrew too.

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PLMITCH's Photo PLMITCH Posts: 13,534
6/20/16 9:23 A

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If you are following Jeff's methodology, yes run/walk is a key to success. As far as the correct ratio, I recommend trying some various ratios during your training runs. Right now I have settled in on 45 second run / 15 second walk, especially in the summer months, and have no trouble being able to run 9-10 minute miles.

Patrick
Team Leader, 50+ Males

http://www.fitbit.com/user/2C
KRJ7


SW = 287 (01/08/07)
1st Goal Weight = 210
(achieved 03/13/2012)
2nd Goal Weight = 199
(achieved 05/03/2012)
3rd Goal Weight = 187 [100 pounds lost since starting on SP]
(achieved 08/18/2012)
Final Goal Weight = 179
(achieved 02/21/2013)


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BFITZH2O SparkPoints: (116)
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6/20/16 9:16 A

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I am new here and I apologize if this should be posted else\where. I am not new to running, but I am new to the Galloway program and have not been seriously running for a couple of years.

I understand the pace and interval I should use in training, but what do I do in a race ? I will start doing 5K races this summer, then move onto 10Ks this Fall. My last MM time was 9:27. Do I run the entire 5K at the proposed pace? Do I run walk ? if so, what ratio ?

THank you

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PLMITCH's Photo PLMITCH Posts: 13,534
3/12/15 1:29 P

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I have found the training plans in Jeff's book "Galloway's Book On Running" very helpful and takes out the guesswork. Especially true for my first HM, which I'll be running in on 3/22.

Patrick
Team Leader, 50+ Males

http://www.fitbit.com/user/2C
KRJ7


SW = 287 (01/08/07)
1st Goal Weight = 210
(achieved 03/13/2012)
2nd Goal Weight = 199
(achieved 05/03/2012)
3rd Goal Weight = 187 [100 pounds lost since starting on SP]
(achieved 08/18/2012)
Final Goal Weight = 179
(achieved 02/21/2013)


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TXHRT4U's Photo TXHRT4U Posts: 8,752
3/10/15 6:21 P

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Thank you! I agree. I know most of this. I have been nasal breathing to help me monitor my HR better. Usually when my HR goes to high, it is harder to nasal breath. It kinda keeps me in check. Like you mentioned, I need to get more longer runs in with a slower pace to increase my stamina.

I have lots of fine tuning to do. Thank you for your advise.



"Where I am today is where my mind put me."










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LIVE2RUN4LIFE's Photo LIVE2RUN4LIFE SparkPoints: (457,726)
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3/10/15 1:04 P

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Hi TXHRT4U,

Generally speaking, to improve race times, you need to train in a way that stimulates a variety of physical adaptations. Running all your training runs at a single pace is not the best training practice, and running faster during training runs will not necessarily develop you more fully as a runner.

To increase your stamina (i.e. the ability to sustain race pace over the entire distance) you need to improve your aerobic base (i.e. the ability to deliver oxygen and fuel to the muscles as fast as they consume them). This means increasing capillaries and mitochondria in the muscles, improving the rate at which you oxygenate the blood with each breath, and increasing the amount of blood pumped with each beat of the heart. Paradoxically, you also want to lower the heart rate (a lower heart rate is less tiring) while pumping sufficient blood volume to the muscles. All of these physical adaptations are stimulated by long aerobic runs (not fast runs which stimulate the anaerobic system). So my first recommendation is to increase the length of your long run and run it at an easy pace.

What is the length of your current long run? I'd say work up to at least 15 miles and longer would be better. Your goal here is to make your race distance a piece of cake, aerobically. Increasing weekly run volume helps with this as well.

Another component of stamina is your lactic threshold, i.e. the pace at which the waste products build up in your muscles faster than your body can remove them. There are two things you are after here with your training. First to stimulate adaptations that make the body better able to remove these waste products and second to get the brain more tolerant of the discomfort that comes from this build up.

A good workout for this is a tempo run (at 10K pace). These shouldn't be really long runs. 20 to 40 minutes at tempo pace should do it, once a week. Sandwich these 20 to 40 minutes with several easy warm up and cool down miles. Your goal is to stimulate the body to adapt, not to wear yourself out so much that you can't recover before the next training run.

Finally, it is important to develop running economy at race pace. A good workout for this purpose is a medium long run (6 or 8 miles) with two or three race pace miles included. Start with those miles in the middle, work towards ending the run with 2 or 3 miles at race pace.

The most important recommedation I have, though, is to be sure that your paces are based on your current running fitness, i.e. do a Magic Mile time trial to determine what your target race pace should be and base your training paces on that.

Edited by: LIVE2RUN4LIFE at: 3/10/2015 (13:29)
Catherine

If you're not having fun, then why run?

You don't get to choose how you're going to die, or when. You can only decide how you're going to live. Now.
-- Joan Baez

We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts we make the world.
-- the Buddha


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TXHRT4U's Photo TXHRT4U Posts: 8,752
3/9/15 11:37 P

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Catherine, thank you very much for your explanation. Your last paragraph is exactly what I experienced in my race this past weekend. Last year I ran the 9.5 miles in 1:34 and I walked more in that race then I have done in any of my races. This year my time was 1:38 and I didn't walk at all. I thought I was doing great. I was recalling certain points of last years race where I was walking and I thought to myself I was doing great. I try not to look at my watch too much and listen to my body. Like you said, my average for the distance was obviously slower.

If I wanted to increase my time for this race for next year, would I take my avg pace and drop 1 minute off of it and train at that speed?

"Where I am today is where my mind put me."










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3/6/15 8:31 P

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Hi HARPANGEL36,

Here are my 2 cents on several of your questions:

Yes, race pace is (or can be) faster than training pace for everyone. Training pace is intentionally slower than you are capable of running the distance. Why is that? In a word, RECOVERY. For example, it takes up to two weeks to recover from a half marathon run at race pace. If you were to run your long runs at race pace (or close to it), you'd either be continually disrupting your training plan or continuing to train without being recovered. If you tried to continue with regularly scheduled training runs before you were recovered, you'd eventually sideline yourself with injuries. For a race, you go all out with the intention of taking some time off afterwards to recover. So it is not a good idea to run regularly with people who are faster than if you are in training and need to stick to a schedule of training runs.

And it's not just the injury risk of continually running close to your peak pace. The adaptations that make us better, faster runners occur during recovery, not during the run. Running breaks the body down; recovery rebuilds it stronger. If you are continually short circuiting the recovery process, you are also undermining the rate at which you improve as a runner.

A key aspect of the interval is the ratio of run to walk. 1/1 and :30/:30 are the same ratio so it is not surprising that pace would be similar with both in shorter runs. Where you will start to see a difference caused by the longer run segment is when the runs get longer. You will be more tired and the more frequent breaks of a :30/:30 may make it easier to sustain your pace.

Which brings another aspect of this to consider. Our pace varies with the length of the run. We are all capable of running much faster if we are only running one mile than we are if we run 10 miles. Or, we may be able to run much faster at the beginning of a long run than at the end when we are tired. This is a common problem for beginning runners who don't know how to pace themselves and thus wear themselves out early and have trouble covering a longer distance for that reason. Another way to look at it is to remember that there is speed and then there is stamina. Stamina is the ability to sustain a speed for a given distance. You need to find the pace that you can sustain and work on improving that, not just improving raw speed. Will you be running short runs or long runs with these friends?

Finally, it seems logical to assume that a interval with more running will yield a faster average speed. But in fact, your average speed is affected most by the pace that you can sustain during that run interval. If the longer intervals tires you out quickly, you can (will) slow down enough during the run segment to affect the average speed. You are best served by sticking with a run interval that you don't slow down in the middle of. I hope that makes sense.

Catherine

If you're not having fun, then why run?

You don't get to choose how you're going to die, or when. You can only decide how you're going to live. Now.
-- Joan Baez

We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts we make the world.
-- the Buddha


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HARPANGEL36's Photo HARPANGEL36 SparkPoints: (13,213)
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3/6/15 6:39 P

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Thank you both for that. The pace chart is very interesting. The friends I was wanting to catch up to run a 1:1 which ironically according to the chart is the pace I do at 30:30. The running with friends would only be for races as I don't have anyone who wants to run with me at 0430 lol. So trillium you have a pace for distance and a pace for races?

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3/6/15 6:14 P

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I think the difficult part of this question is if you can run with your friend and enjoy it. It can be really tough to run harder and have a faster runner set the pace. Yes it can be useful at time to get faster, but it may be difficult depending on how often you run with them.

Do you want to run with them regularly, or just for a race. What ratio and pace do you need to stay with the group.

You may be able to hold your current pace while running more. However for here is Jeff's suggested ratios for different paces I have a natural pace where I can train for a distance. At that pace the ratios work well for me. If I increase the running I won't speed up, unless it's a race. If I increase the walking I don't slow down as much as you'd expect. That's because there's a point where I can't maintain my speed for the running interval

Run Walk Run ratio should correspond to the pace used (Runners).
8 min/miórun 4 min/walk 35 seconds
9 min/mió 4 min run-1 min walk
10 min/mió-3:1
11 min/mió2:30-1
12 min/mió-2:1
13 min/mió-1:1
14 min/mió30 sec run/30 sec walk
15 min/mió30 sec/45 sec
16 min/mió30 sec/60 sec

Cindy or Trill
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PLMITCH's Photo PLMITCH Posts: 13,534
3/6/15 5:24 P

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What you'll need to do is track how much distance you are covering during your 45 seconds of running. You may need to pick up your pace during those 45 seconds to achieve your goal, but you'll need to do some tracking first

Most of Jeff's training plans include speed training 1 day a week or on alternating weeks. So in my HM training, every other week I've been running 800M with a goal of 5 minutes or less. For 5K's, the distance and time is typically shorter -- 400M in 2:30 -- but this is a great way to improve speed.

Hope this helps...

Patrick
Team Leader, 50+ Males

http://www.fitbit.com/user/2C
KRJ7


SW = 287 (01/08/07)
1st Goal Weight = 210
(achieved 03/13/2012)
2nd Goal Weight = 199
(achieved 05/03/2012)
3rd Goal Weight = 187 [100 pounds lost since starting on SP]
(achieved 08/18/2012)
Final Goal Weight = 179
(achieved 02/21/2013)


282 Maintenance Weeks
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HARPANGEL36's Photo HARPANGEL36 SparkPoints: (13,213)
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3/6/15 4:20 P

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I hope this question doesn't sound too trivial to a group of experienced Galloway runners. I had been doing a 30:30 interval and was getting about a 13:20 pace for my 3 mile runs. I changed to 45:30 a few weeks ago because I wanted to gradually increase my running time to be able to run with friends who run longer run/walk ratios. The thing is, my time at 45:30 is about a 14:00 mi/Mi. I'm not sure why it is slower if I have increased the running time. Wondering if you would go back to 30:30 or keep at the 45:30 and hope times improve in order to eventually run with friends. I like to run 5K races and aim for a little better time each race. I should add that I am no more tired after a 45:30 run than a 30:30 run. I would love any input from my fellow Spark friends.

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