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TIMOTHYNOHE's Photo TIMOTHYNOHE Posts: 4,317
2/19/13 11:40 P

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And I stumbled upon this article:

abcnews.go.com/US/big-food-money-acc
us
ed-influencing-science/story?id=1384R>5186


The print article goes into details about Allison and it's not good.

There also is a video report of a woman who lost 300+ of her 589 pounds the old-fashioned way: hard work and a healthy diet. OK, for her it was a pretty boring healthy diet.

Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible -- St Francis of Assisi

Rock 'n' Roll Dublin Half Marathon, Dublin, Ireland, 8/5/2013
ie.competitor.com/dublin/


TIMOTHYNOHE's Photo TIMOTHYNOHE Posts: 4,317
2/19/13 10:44 P

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The lead author of the report, David Allison, is not a nutritionist or a dietician. He's a "biostatistician" whatever that is. He has done no original research here but seems to have done a study of studies.

Allison seriously shoots himself in the foot with his conclusions that meal replacements and drugs work in battling obesity. Most weight loss drugs have undesirable side-effects. And meal replacements are ultimately not sustainable. He has an agenda that goes beyond myth busting. I put him in the same camp with the sugar industry funding "studies" to show the dangers of high fructose corn syrup.

* Small, sustained changes in how many calories we take in or burn will accumulate to produce large weight changes over the long term. Fact: Small changes in calorie intake or expenditure do not accumulate indefinitely. Changes in body mass eventually cancel out the change in calorie intake or burning.

This is a rather curious statement. Of course the body adjusts to what you are doing. that's why you change up what you eat and how you move. I personally have never heard this particular one. It doesn't make a lot of sense. Common sense would have told me this one was false.

* Setting realistic goals in obesity treatment is important. Otherwise patients become frustrated and lose less weight. Fact: Some data suggest that people do better with more ambitious goals.

"Some data suggest" are classic weasel words. They really have no meaning in an argument or discussion. they are as useful as "Authoritative sources have suggested."

I have seen it go both ways on this one. Some people, like me, needed the smaller incremental goals because the enormity of losing 100 pounds made me not want to even start. But the real changes that can occur with just 10% weight loss makes the incremental approach a good approach.

* Gradually losing weight is better than quickly losing pounds. Quick weight losses are more likely to be regained. Fact: People who lose more weight rapidly are more likely to weigh less, even after several years.

Balderdash! People who lose a lot of weigh fast rarely establish the necessary new, permanent habits to keep the weight off. They lose their thirty pounds in a month, announce Mission Accomplished, and go right back to what they were doing to gain the weight in the first place. Within months, they are crying the blues about losing thirty pounds and finding forty. Read the blogs on this site. They are everywhere.

* Patients who feel “ready” to lose weight are more likely to make the required lifestyle changes. Health-care professionals therefore need to measure each patient’s diet readiness. Fact: Among those who seek weight-loss treatment, evidence suggests that assessing readiness neither predicts weight loss nor helps to make it happen.

This is one I agree with. Commitment is required, not just readiness. I for one was not ready. I was taken kicking and whining up to Weight Watchers. I stated flat out that I would give it six weeks to fail. My wife told me to give it eight weeks, we had monthly passes, but it had to be an honest eight weeks. I did and I am approaching my fifth anniversary, having lost 90 of those 100 pounds … never got the last 10 … in eighteen months. That works out to about one pound a week.

* Physical education classes, in their current form, play an important role in reducing and preventing childhood obesity. Fact: Physical education, as typically provided, does not appear to counter obesity.

No, but it gets them off their fat butts and hopefully outside to play more often. But no, PE classes as they exist now are worthless.

* Breastfeeding protects the breastfed offspring against future obesity. Fact: Breastfeeding has many benefits for mother and child, but the data do not show that it protects against obesity.

Another one I have never heard. The habits of the mother, her attitudes toward food and fitness have more influence.

* One episode of sex can burn up to 300 Kcals (Calories) per person. Fact: It may be closer to one-twentieth of that on average, and not much more than sitting on the couch.

I always thought this one was a joke. Think about this: a 5k burns 300 Calories. That's 30 minutes of running. I *wish* sex was a vigorous as a 5k.

* Snacking leads to weight gain. Fact: No high quality studies support that, the authors say.

This is another non-statement. What kinds of snacks are we talking about? Potato chips and coca cola? or a bowl of grapes? And if they are having potato chips, is the snacker limiting his intake to a standard serving? or eating the whole 9 oz. bag? Two oreos (90 calories)? or a whole sleeve of 10 (450 calories)? Healthy snacking actually leads to weight loss.

* Regularly eating breakfast helps prevent obesity. Fact: Two studies found no effect on weight and one suggested that the effect depended on whether people were used to skipping breakfast or not.

And yet decades of experience and research showing this to be a fact are to be disregarded because of two studies that found no effect. If they are simply referring to just any breakfast, all breakfasts, then I can see how they would get that result. Comparing my breakfasts - egg white omelets, steel cut oatmeal, fruit and fat free yogurt smoothies and so much more -- to my son's -- danish & coffee, McDonald's, bran muffin (really just a large cupcake with a halo usually packing about 900 calories) -- is really not a valid study. And the third actually makes sense if they are changing no other parts of their daily eating.


Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible -- St Francis of Assisi

Rock 'n' Roll Dublin Half Marathon, Dublin, Ireland, 8/5/2013
ie.competitor.com/dublin/


DOUGDC's Photo DOUGDC Posts: 2,167
2/19/13 9:23 P

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I often wonder whether the advice of nutritionists is based on well conducted studies they can cite, or on concepts that seem to make sense, but have never been well tested and documented.

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ZENANDNOW's Photo ZENANDNOW SparkPoints: (68,476)
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2/19/13 10:06 A

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It's about time that studies such as this focus on men instead of women. Most studies that are done are mainly focused on women, leaving us guys to wonder if the findings in such studies would pertain to them as well, and how much, etc.

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BILBY4's Photo BILBY4 SparkPoints: (48,087)
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2/19/13 6:57 A

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I liked this bit:
"The study was done in 1984 and didn't measure the women's experience."


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2/19/13 12:15 A

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I tend to disgree. The study seemed quite thorough, and the myths do make sense. I know soem of the "old" myths are false...because I started my weight-loss program at 426 pounds. And I restrict my daily calories to less than 1300/day, and I've lost over 80 pounds so far. So I know that rapid weight loss can be beneficial, especially for heavier persons like myself. Although I now eat breakfast daily...I didn't use to. And over the course of about three years I went from about 550 pounds to 426 in 2012.

It's never good to just accept the health experts mantra about obesity and what not to do and such. It always pays to do some research for oneself and act accordingly. Each person is different and what works for some, won't work for others.



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TIMOTHYNOHE's Photo TIMOTHYNOHE Posts: 4,317
2/18/13 11:22 P

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Oddly enough the HuffPo article was the most balanced. It reported on Allison so-called myth-busting then pointed out the vested interests in artificial solution in the studies he cited.

"Go ahead, skip breakfast if that's what you're used to because we have this drug to help you through the morning. It's ok to go for the quick loss ... then when you gain it back, we have bariatric surgery for you."

And enjoy those Doritios. They have no impact on your weight gain. Does that even make sense?

Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible -- St Francis of Assisi

Rock 'n' Roll Dublin Half Marathon, Dublin, Ireland, 8/5/2013
ie.competitor.com/dublin/


ZENANDNOW's Photo ZENANDNOW SparkPoints: (68,476)
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2/18/13 10:46 P

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This paper raises serious questions about our understanding of obesity. Links:

http://conscienhealth.org/2013/01/obesit
y-myths-busted-in-the-new-england-jour
nal-of-medicine/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/30
/obesity-myths-debunked-sex-calories-s
nacking-bad_n_2585332.html

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJ
Msa1208051 (New England Journal of Medicine)


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