Group photo
Author:
RENATARUNS's Photo RENATARUNS SparkPoints: (4,367)
Fitness Minutes: (2,155)
Posts: 1,379
3/25/13 8:53 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
If I was you at this point I would probably just plan to go out "a little faster than usual" and whatever that turns out to be when you get to the first mile mark, go from there. If it proves to be too much after a mile or two, back off and slow down. If you get to the end and still have lots left over, try a little faster the next time. It's all kind of guesswork, even when you've been doing it a while. You kind of don't know how much you can push yourself (or are willing to push yourself) until you actually try.

Back in the day when I was a teenager and ran competitively I would do my training runs (for more-or-less 5K races) at 8-8:30, then race at just about 7 minutes even, but I can't claim that's typical or even useful information for you.

Height 5'8 1/2"
SW: 190+
CW: 141.0 Woohoo!

5K 4/21/11: 31:55


284 Maintenance Weeks
0
75
150
225
300
LJR4HEALTH's Photo LJR4HEALTH Posts: 33,174
3/20/13 8:01 P

My SparkPage
Reply
I'm new to running and this is all great information Thanks NANLEYKW for asking this question

Linda (Florida - Eastern Standard Time )

I am " (we are) spiritual beings having a human experience " Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

Amethyst BLC Fall 2012 to Summer 2013

2012 Fall 5% Challenge Community Team Casual Travelers t0
2013 Spring & summer 5% Challenge Community Casual Travelers

BLC22 CAMO CREW Squad Violet Assassins

Previous BLC 17 to BLC 20

�Fail to plan, plan to fail.� Carl W. Buechner


 November Minutes: 0
0
35
70
105
140
SP_COACH_NANCY SparkPoints: (0)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
3/18/13 10:05 P

Send Private Message
Reply
Hi NANLEYKW,

Running isn't science where you can guesstimate how quickly you will improve--genetics, current level of fitness, age, rate of recovery, etc all play a role in how quickly one builds speed. But you can't rush the process--and if you do so, your risk for injury may skyrocket as you focus on the end result versus the journey to get you to that point. To take 3.25 minutes off your race pace (and for a longer distance) in just 6 months is fantastic.

It sounds like you are doing what you need to do to get faster--you just have to have the patience.

Coach Nancy

NANLEYKW's Photo NANLEYKW SparkPoints: (76,244)
Fitness Minutes: (31,253)
Posts: 867
3/18/13 9:55 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks, all! I've started doing speed drills now and then. I either do zombie chases in Zombies, Run! (which is only about three "sprints" in a 30-minute run) or I do something like I did the other day, which was alternating a 30-second sprint with a two-minute easy run, for six sets of intervals. Between those drills and just my increasing experience, I've gone from running a 13:25-minute mile in my first 5k back in August to about a 10-minute mile in the 7k I ran this past weekend.

I'm curious, though--is there any sort of rough guideline for how much faster one should be running in a race than in training? Because given my current way of doing things, I can see myself increasing my speed with fartleks, but still only having the same pace in training and in races. Would it be reasonable to shoot for 10% faster? A minute?

SP_COACH_NANCY SparkPoints: (0)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
3/18/13 3:58 P

Send Private Message
Reply
I'm not a big fan of running calculators especially for new runners and the reason is it makes many runners feel if they don't 'hit' the numbers they are failing in their training or they push themselves too hard to hit those numbers versus using how they feel as feedback.

Just my two cents..

Coach nancy


SONSON72 SparkPoints: (0)
Fitness Minutes: (177)
Posts: 9
3/18/13 3:55 P

Send Private Message
Reply
I've used my C25k app to do fartleks before. It really pushed me and I didn't have to be concerned about time because my app did that for me.


SEABREEZE65's Photo SEABREEZE65 Posts: 11,207
3/18/13 2:51 P

Send Private Message
Reply
Try this calculator from McMillan

It calculates a race goal based on a recent race.

www.mcmillanrunning.com/index.php/ca
lc
Usage/calculate


I am a Galloway run-walk-run runner and so use this suggested pace calculator....

jeffgalloway.com/resources/gallracep
re
dict.html


I'm sure there are other good one's also.

"It's not how old you are, it's how you are old."

"I am still learning." Michelangelo

"You aren't old until age becomes your excuse." Joe Friel




 November Minutes: 0
0
375
750
1125
1500
SP_COACH_NANCY SparkPoints: (0)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
3/18/13 2:15 P

Send Private Message
Reply
Hi,

You are still a semi-new runner so I would not be too concerned with doing a lot of speed work, but now is a good time to start. The easiest way to increase your speed is doing fartleks...theses are short burst of running interspersed with your regular runs--it could be running for 5 houses at a speed that you become a little breathless and you bring your pace back down for a few minutes, only to pick up your pace again for 5 houses. I actually do a 2 minute pick up (that is a lot so I only recommend no more than 20-30 seconds for you) followed by a 4 minute slog, then back to 2 minute, 4 minute slog...I do roughly 10 sets.

You don't need to do these but once every week. What you are trying to do is teach your body to run with a little more lactate in your system as your body utilizes more glycogen (stored carbs) for energy. These are very intense runs, so you want to allow a good recovery between them and your next run.

As you continue to get comfortable running faster, than you will be able to do so in your race. As for how quickly the adaptation happens depends on many factors--including age, your nutrition, rest, etc.

The great thing with being a new runner is adaptation tends to occur in leaps and bounds the first year and slows over time the longer we run.

I hope this helps!

Coach Nancy

NANLEYKW's Photo NANLEYKW SparkPoints: (76,244)
Fitness Minutes: (31,253)
Posts: 867
3/18/13 1:59 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I've been running for a few months now (finished C25K in August), and have run five 5ks and an 8k so far. My problem is that when I'm running a race, I seem to run at the same pace I do for my training runs. (I should note that I don't think I'm running too fast in training. When I run with a friend, we can carry on a conversation.) So, I guess I'm wondering if there's some magical way I can determine how much faster my race pace should be? If my training pace hovers right around a 10-minute mile for 5k, is there a reasonable goal I should set for a race pace?

Thanks!

Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Rookie Running Group General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics:
Last Post:
11/10/2017 4:05:30 PM
6/6/2018 10:28:13 AM

Related Topics: Calories Burned Running   How to Run with Proper Form and Technique   Runner Stretches  

Thread URL: https://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x2189x52588795

Review our Community Guidelines