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SAVANNAHZMOMMA1's Photo SAVANNAHZMOMMA1 Posts: 712
1/18/11 8:34 P

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Riffing off of that last quote, I need to have, besides my To Do list, a "To Think" list!

I loved the article, Cassie. Including the entire article at the Time link! Thank you for sharing it. I should go back to it and "share" it on my Facebook account.

Joy

Races Goal:
Sub 8:30/mile for a Springtime Race!
Volunteer at a race before June 2012!

Goal Winter & Spring 2012:
Develop an interesting cross-training routine that will be fun for my daughter to join in on.
10,000 steps/day whether running or walking.
Launch my SLEEP project!


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BARBARA_BOO's Photo BARBARA_BOO Posts: 9,794
1/4/11 2:22 A

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That's really great to hear, CASSIE. I can see your energy and renewal in the things you write.

It's good to trust ourselves when something just doesn't feel right.

And I know what you mean, about it feeling like "you". We've talked about that phenomenon before on an intellectual basis. However, I'm feeling it, too, within me. My daily goals don't feel like hardships. They feel like "me". The feeling is a very centered, quiet kind of confidence, right?

We have kept on slogging along, taking one step at a time as we were able to, and the cumulative effect is that foundation you describe. I agree. I think the sky's the limit!

I ran across a really cool quotation today.

"You are the only person who thinks in your mind.
You are the power and authority of your world.
You GET TO HAVE whatever you CHOOSE TO THINK."

I repeat. "The sky's the limit."
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Boo, Barb, BSue, Queen Legarathien of Nargothrond

"YOU'RE NEVER TOO OLD TO PLAY!"

~Team Leader, Separation of Church and Weight
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=2072

~Team Leader, The Darker Side of SparkPeople www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=89


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CASSIES's Photo CASSIES Posts: 1,376
1/3/11 11:18 P

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Thanks for the wonderful analysis, Boo.

I do agree that it is in keeping with our approach here at spark.

I have come to value my accumulated spark points and the monthly rewards I receive. They mean that I am changing my lifestyle. Replacing old habits with new ones.

I have kept on taking one step at a time and it is finally feeling like me.

And I have a burst of renewal. I instictively knew that I had to hang in maintenance for a while and now I am ready to take action on the solid foundation I have been building. And I think this foundation will carry me down that road to some exciting new aspects of myself....lets hope!


�The more we witness our emotional reactions and understand how they work, the easier it is to refrain.� ― Pema Ch�dr�n



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BARBARA_BOO's Photo BARBARA_BOO Posts: 9,794
1/2/11 10:25 P

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This is very much in keeping with SP's approach of gradually replacing old habits with new ones, by weakening the old and strengthening the new.

This article says to me that taking that fork of "least" resistance , giving in to thoughts, delusions or cravings (for a moment of pleasure--our reward for giving in) and regretting it later is a habit that has gotten strong by being reinforced. That habit can weaken from lack of use (attrition) if we stop going down that fork often enough and long enough.

I like the fork of the road comparison. How else can we change our direction and find out about the "new world"?

The article reinforces my belief that the more we look down that unexplored fork in the road and find excitement, fulfillment and comfort there, the less we will keep going down the familiar fork (the one that has us abusing food and medicating with it). There can be fearful things down that new fork. Unknowns are like that.

And yet, as this article implies, it's worth the risk because the good stuff is down that fork, too, something pleasurable to turn to for whatever we currently get from food.

The richer our lives, the less we will have to think about our weight.

Surf's up, CASSIE. Enjoy the thrills!
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Last one in's a rotten egg.

Boo, Barb, BSue, Queen Legarathien of Nargothrond

"YOU'RE NEVER TOO OLD TO PLAY!"

~Team Leader, Separation of Church and Weight
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=2072

~Team Leader, The Darker Side of SparkPeople www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=89


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ANN5497's Photo ANN5497 Posts: 1,591
1/2/11 9:36 P

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Love it - thanks for sharing

Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. Anais Nin


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CASSIES's Photo CASSIES Posts: 1,376
1/2/11 8:49 P

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I am going to work on my "urge surfing." I also like the explanation of will power at the end.

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�The more we witness our emotional reactions and understand how they work, the easier it is to refrain.� ― Pema Ch�dr�n



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CASSIES's Photo CASSIES Posts: 1,376
1/2/11 8:39 P

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This is taken from Time Magazine article what the experts say about keeping resolutions.

Do What the Dalai Lama Would Do

Alan Marlatt, director of the Addictive Behaviors Research Center at the University of Washington, studies "mindfulness-based relapse prevention," which uses meditation and other ideas from Buddhist teachings to help people break bad habits.
(Read "Battling Addiction: Are 12 Steps Too Many?")

"Between stimulus and response, there's a space, and in that space is our power to choose our response, and in our response lies our growth and freedom," says Marlatt, quoting author and Holocaust survivor Victor Frankl. Marlatt says, "Mindfulness gets you into that space."

Being mindful may involve traditional meditation, in which you sit quietly and observe your thoughts and breathing without judgment. But here, it is also used to focus awareness on thoughts and feelings that lead to unwanted behavior. Simply recognizing the triggers to relapse can help you choose not to give into them. "When there's a fork in the road, craving is pulling you one way. Well, what's the other way? You have to look down the other road and see where it takes you. Then you have a choice, instead of being on autopilot," says Marlatt.

One tactic he recommends for resisting those cravings is called "urge-surfing." It involves being mindful of the fact that craving is like a wave it rises to a peak, then falls. This happens whether you yield to the urge or not, though most people erroneously think their craving will escalate endlessly unless they give in. In fact, succumbing to cravings only reinforces them resisting, in contrast, reinforces resistance. Marlatt advises watching your urge, noting its peak and "surfing" it, rather than allowing it to wipe you out.

Another trick is to recognize that willpower is like a muscle it gets stronger with appropriate use but ultimately weakens if overloaded. That's why Hester recommends setting short-term goals that are "moderately difficult, realistic, concrete and measurable." As with weight-lifting, starting at a level that is challenging but not overwhelming can provide a sense of achievement and success which can give you the drive to take on bigger challenges



Read more: www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8
59
9,1950511,00.html#ixzz19vna5aJo


Edited by: CASSIES at: 1/2/2011 (20:46)

�The more we witness our emotional reactions and understand how they work, the easier it is to refrain.� ― Pema Ch�dr�n



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