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GRYPHON55's Photo GRYPHON55 Posts: 640
8/28/10 6:46 P

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I read this book just as I was starting out on SP (back in Feb 2010) and it changed the way I looked at food when I ate out. No more mindlessly choosing the pretty picture on the Applebee's or Chili's or Denny's menu - all I could see was fat, sugar, and salt - the unholy trinity that the good Doctor focuses on.

I didn't pay as much attention to the rules as a way to manage cravings, but thanks, BarbaraBoo, because now I'm going to go back and read that chapter again. I could use some rules like "I don't eat fries" as a way to just completely get out of the "should I or shouldn't I eat them today" debate.

I'm located in Pacific Daylight Time.


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BARBARA_BOO's Photo BARBARA_BOO Posts: 9,794
8/27/10 10:38 P

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Thank you for the link. I watched the whole thing and enjoyed it.

I have read the book and it's outstanding! So much new and hopeful information about how we can undo the conditioned hypereating.

Here are some examples from the chapter called "Rules of Disengagement",

"Because people with conditioned hypereating are so sensitive to food cues, they tend to make eating decisions on the spur of the moment. To compete with the chaotic nature of that behavior, we need to develop a set of rules to keep us from becoming aroused. Setting rules helps us make the steps of habit reversal real. Rules provide structure, preparing us for encounters with tempting stimuli and redirecting our attention elsewhere."

"Simply knowing the right behavior isn't enough. What we need is to develop a planned response when we encounter a stimulating food that drives conditioned hypereating."

"A PLAN connects SPECIFIC ACTIONS to SPECIFIC POSSIBILITIES....Concrete 'if`-then' rules can be useful and effective...If I encounter this cue, then I regulate my responses to it in this way."

"When my brain receives the signal that salient foods are nearby and recalls their pleasure, I remember my rules which tell me, 'Don't stop. Pass them by. Turn your attention elsewhere.' Set that rule, stick with it, and in time your desire will decrease."

"Rules aren't the same thing as willpower. Willpower pits the force of reinforcing stimuli against your determination to resist, a clash of titans that can become very uncomfortable."

"A rule makes EXPLICIT the negative consequences of giving in to your impulses and the positive consequences of not giving in...The more specific the rules are, the easier it is to hold them in mind and to represent an alternative action. Categorical rules--'I don't eat french fries,' 'I will not have dessert'--are the easiest to follow."

"With practice, new responses can eventually become as automatic as the old ones...The shift from wanting to behave differently to actually doing so requires setting rules and practicing them until they become programmed behavior."

"The goal...is 'to create rules that pass control of the external stimuli to the self.' Only then can we make the essential transition from a desire to change to change itself."
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He stresses the importance of small daily REWARDS (something other than food) for sticking to our plans. The pleasure of the food conditioned us to eat too much of it. Now, we need the pleasure of other things, to gradually replace the pleasure from the food. He says our ability to follow our own rules will eventually carry its own reward.

Fantastic book! I'm using a lot of his ideas now and they work for me.

EDIT:

MIKIIO, the way you plan your days the night before is an ideal method for setting up "if-then" rules for events like eating out or attending parties where you know there will be some "hot" food stimuli floating all around you. I really like your approach, as I've already mentioned to you.

Edited by: BARBARA_BOO at: 8/27/2010 (22:53)
Boo, Barb, BSue, Queen Legarathien of Nargothrond

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8/26/10 10:39 A

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I had never heard of him before watching his conference, but his book is now on my Amazon list "To be read."

Valerie

"To do is to be" - Nietzsche
"To be is to do" - Kant
"Do Be Do Be Do" - Sinatra



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COFFEEDIVA's Photo COFFEEDIVA Posts: 745
8/26/10 10:34 A

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Dr. Kessler's book, "The End of Overeating," is phenomenal. I look forward to people posting on this topic.

"Do What You Love; the Money Will Follow." (That's the title of a book I love -- and I'm working on getting the gumption to believe it!)


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8/26/10 10:11 A

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One of my Sparkfriends (VALERIEMAHA) has mailed me this link to a speech Dr David Kessler did.

As it is one of the most interesting stuff I've watched on this subject, I'd like to share it with you.

fora.tv/2009/05/08/The_End_of
_Overeati
ng_Dr_David_A_Kessler


What do you think of it?

Valerie

"To do is to be" - Nietzsche
"To be is to do" - Kant
"Do Be Do Be Do" - Sinatra



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