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CHANGINGHORSES's Photo CHANGINGHORSES SparkPoints: (69,839)
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1/11/15 7:35 A

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I tend to head more to the trails in winter and my pace slows way down. Also my alternative if any small town in the area where I can run the streets since they are usually clear. The small towns near me are not busy with traffic except maybe the main street.
Winter is when I get to play though with the X-C Skis or snow shoes if there is enough snow. That is how I make up for the lack of running miles. Of course we cannot emphasize enough the importance of the clothing.
Normally I can appreciate the seasons but winter sometimes gets the best of me. I keep telling myself that I'll be back in the warm car or house in no time, just suck it up and keep moving.

Spring is right around the corner! emoticon

Edited by: CHANGINGHORSES at: 1/18/2015 (08:52)
Live your life as though you are obligated to make the world a better place. Make a difference today, be the one!


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1/8/15 4:06 P

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Screws make too much noise...

Eric
"Old Age and Treachery..."
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1/8/15 3:50 P

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The problem I have with screws is I lose them when running on bare asphalt. If I could guarantee that snow and ice would precede the asphalt in my runs, no big deal. It's cheap to replace screws. But if I lose half my screws by mile 4, I don't have them for snow or ice at mile 6.

Trail shoes do well for me with snow. They're not much better than road shoes for ice, but as near as I can tell nothing that's any good with ice does well with half the run being clear pavement. Trail shoes at least transition between snow and clear pavement smoothly.


- Kevin

"Discipline is remembering what you want. " - David Campbell

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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
1/8/15 3:11 P

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Never heard anyone express unhappiness with screws. I'm curious what you don't like about them. The one downside I'll agree with is that you can't slip them on/off like yaks (and similar products). But in the middle of a run, I never see runners take them off or vice versa.

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FUTBOLREF's Photo FUTBOLREF SparkPoints: (47,782)
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1/8/15 9:27 A

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In winter sidewalks can take weeks to clear off since many people around here don't bother to shovel. And there are lot's of places that don't have sidewalks near the house.

I usually run on the roads instead of the sidewalk unless it is along a main drag. Much better footing year round.

In the dark this time of the year, I use an older version of this headlamp: http://www.amazon.com/Petzl-Tikka-Headlamp
/dp/B00HQNXETI/ref=pd_sim_sg_6?ie=UTF8
&refRID=0JC8SXKP5X9SCV36DCPY. I think it is about 80 lumens with fresh batteries. This is one that I can easily adjust when I get off on a trail. I also put a flasher on the back of the head band because it gets the flasher up higher so drivers coming up behind me can see me easier. I use these: http://www.amazon.com/Personal-Flashing-Sa
fety-Light-Belt/dp/B001JPS5BQ/ref=sr_1
_10?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=14207
25304&sr=1-10&keywords=nathan+strobe+light. I put it on a weird strobe effect.

I've found a flashlight is more for my benefit seeing stuff than for drivers to see me.

I also put on a hi-viz shirt whenever possible. I also put on white cotton gloves over whatever ones I am wearing for warmth. I want to be as visible as possible even to the guy texting driving too fast in a residential area.

On ice I run flat footed (concentrate on placing the full foot on the ground at once) and chop my stride. Seems to work fine but it is significantly slower. It also really helps me to focus on stride and pay attention to what I am doing. I've put screws in my shoes in the past but don't like them at all. Never tried Yak Traks or similar products. May take the plunge one year.

In winter I am almost always running in the dark. Usually it is a run after work but even on weekend long runs I tend to start before the sun comes up. I am amazed at the number of people I see running with no lights and wearing dark clothing.

Eric
"Old Age and Treachery..."
GLORIAMAJDI's Photo GLORIAMAJDI Posts: 6,421
1/8/15 8:48 A

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Kevin, that is the headlamp that I use and people I run with love it because it lights up so well that they say they don't need a lamp at all. I also have a reflective vest with blinky lights. I am paranoid. People are so distracted these days with their phones and aren't watching anyway, so I feel like I must do all I can to make myself visable.

Best wishes to you for the Winter Warrior Half!

Gloria

"but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint." Isaiah 40:31


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1/8/15 6:47 A

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This is the headlamp I use: www.amazon.com/Black-Diamond-ReVolt-
He
adlamp-Titanium/dp/B00LAEZEN8/ref=srR>_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=14
20
716777&sr=1-2&keywords=revolt+headlamp


It's on a ratcheted hinge that lets me adjust how far in front of me the light hits the pavement. I've been happy with it, but the only other headlamp I've tried was a 30 lumen wimp that was really only good for other people to see me. I got this one as a recommendation for trail running, and I've been happy with it on the roads.

I've seen people out running at night with flashlights, and I notice I can't see them as well as I see the people running with headlamps. I don't know if they're pointing the flashlights too low, or if they just aren't as visible at waist level. I also notice that the newer fancy light-spurs and light bands don't show up as well as the old-fashioned blinking red lights that clip on to a reflective harness.

One of my biggest worries in the dark is drivers not seeing me and not thinking that anyone would be out running this season. My test area is the local hill run Tuesday evenings, where I get to see what is most and least visible of what the other runners are wearing. I suspect newbies think I look gaudy with blinking red lights front and back plus one of the stronger headlamps. I don't care.

Headlamps are recommended for Saturday's Winter Warrior Half. There will still be daylight for the gun at 4 PM, but sunset is 4:55 Saturday. If it's clear, the elite leaders will finish in dusk. With clouds, even the leaders will finish in the dark.

One of the benefits of having that half on Saturday is that this is taper week for me. That means my lunch hour is short enough I can run in daylight, this week. Next week, it will be back to running evenings in the dark. But it may be warmer then; the high Sunday is forecast for 31 F.


- Kevin

"Discipline is remembering what you want. " - David Campbell

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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
1/7/15 9:23 P

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I suspect you're correct about Yaktrax. I have seen many break during trail runs. Not on me but my friends use them and I know they're pretty casual about the transition to pavement, snow-covered or not.

Alas, I cannot afford to wait. Daytime highs have been under 32F for several days and forecast to stay through the weekend. I ran on Tuesday using my road shoes on the sidewalks with conditions that you described quite accurately. I did my share of slipping and had to walk some stretches. On the other hand, I gave some rarely-used stabilizing muscles a workout :-) I guess I'll switch to my trail shoes for tomorrow evening.

You're also right suggesting running during the day. Alas, at this time of year I have to run at night to get the miles in during the week. I use a 230 lumen Vizeri flashlight. (I've never found a headlamp that offered just the features I want.) My friends laugh about it since they can no longer even tell that their headlights are on once I turn on the Vizeri. It completely overpowers everything. It's quite compact so I've become accustomed to carrying it. Here's the link if you're curious:

www.amazon.com/Tactical-LED-Flashlig
ht
-High-Lumen-Waterproof/dp/B00CB4UCW4


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MOBYCARP's Photo MOBYCARP SparkPoints: (296,899)
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1/7/15 8:39 P

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Sidewalks are a bigger problem for me in the winter than roads. They aren't cleared consistently, they're more likely to have ice, and the ice can be on bumpy or otherwise irregular surfaces. I run more in the roads, even on routes where I would use the sidewalk under better conditions.

I don't have any footwear that works well on ice. I am told (but have not tested) that YakTrax work well on ice and stand up OK to bare asphalt. I don't trust the assertion that they stand up well to bare asphalt; it may be that they won't handle as many miles as I'd want to put on them. Mostly, I run the roads and watch for ice. Running in daylight is good. Next best is a high powered headlamp; I have a 130 lumen light I bought for trail running, and it works well for roads in the dark.

But still, I am dependent on being aware of the ice and running slower or slowing to a walk for very bad icy patches. Sometimes I can avoid the icy patches by running in snow, sometimes I can avoid them by running in the traffic lane, sometimes I simply can't avoid them. In any event, I don't think I get ice to the extent that you're talking about for Maryland.

If the surface conditions were alternating bare pavement and frozen meltwater, with an average length of 100 feet for each condition, I think I'd forego running for a day until that changed. Here, it would change because either it would warm up enough for the road salt to take care of the ice; or there would be fresh snow on top of the ice mitigating the slipperiness; or it would get cold enough that road salt would act like sand on the ice and mitigate the slipperiness. But that's the roads. The sidewalks could stay impassible for running for 8 or 10 weeks in a bad winter.

I do wear trail shoes for the snow. They help a lot, compared to straight road shoes. Last winter I put on the trail shoes on January 24 (needed them earlier, but bought them after I found the need) and didn't get to run in road shoes at all until February 22. March was a mix of wearing trail shoes and road shoes, before I got to wear road shoes all the time in April.

My pace leader tries to convince me to do trail running in the snow and ice, and says you do screw shoes on the high tread points of the trail shoes. I might try that if I ever get into trail running, but this is not my year to focus on trail running.


- Kevin

"Discipline is remembering what you want. " - David Campbell

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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
1/7/15 8:04 P

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Here in Maryland, it's going to be 18F tomorrow and I have no problem with clothing but the roads/sidewalks are alternate stretches of pavement and ice. I could handle either by itself but I don't have footwear that can work on both. (Anything that works well on ice will be slippery on pavement and vice versa. And the stretches are too short for a slip-on solution to make any sense.)

The other alternative is running on trails - that should be fine for screwshoes. But I'm reluctant to do that when I could sprain an ankle and be far from civilization when the temp is so low.

Ok, all your hardcore winter runners: What would you do?

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FUTBOLREF's Photo FUTBOLREF SparkPoints: (47,782)
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1/6/15 10:36 A

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"Once you've experienced a certain level of adverse winter weather, lesser levels of adversity aren't as big a deal. Normal winter weather can even be fun." That is so true!

It helps that the seasons change gradually (usually).

Half of running is getting out the door in the first place and just doing it whether its 90 or -10. My most memorable runs are usually when the weather is at an extreme. I keep a section at the back of my running log where I enter what the conditions are and what I am wearing when I find myself either over dressed or under dressed for the conditions.

Going to have to check out the Darn Tough socks...

Eric
"Old Age and Treachery..."
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1/5/15 10:37 P

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I trained for my first half through the hardest winter here in years. Not as cold as Minnesota, but colder than it usually is in upstate NY, and plenty of snow. I learned to wear trail shoes for variable snowy/clear roads and shoulders. I learned that trail shoes make minimal difference on ice, you just have to be careful and sometimes slow to a walk for ice. I learned to dress for various weather conditions.

And I learned that wool socks won't keep my feet dry, but they will keep my feet warm as long as I keep running. Step in a puddle of ice water, and my foot gets cold; but it's warm again 10 steps later. I like Darn Tough socks, which are expensive but last a long time and really work. I bought a couple pair of SmartWool when the local running store was out of Darn Tough and I really needed an extra pair of wool socks. They work okay, too; but I haven't stepped in any puddles of ice water while wearing the SmartWool socks so I can't guarantee they work as well as the Darn Tough socks do.

The worst I ran in was 3 F, 25 mph wind, snow covered roads, snowing, and of course blowing snow. I didn't run very far that day, only about 3 miles. If I have those conditions again, I'll run without glasses. I expected them to fog up when I covered my mouth and nose to run into the wind; I did not anticipate that they would frost over and not recover during my periods of not running into the wind.

Once you've experienced a certain level of adverse winter weather, lesser levels of adversity aren't as big a deal. Normal winter weather can even be fun. I'm hoping for normal winter weather on Saturday for the Winter Warrior Half; but if it turns out to be adverse, I'll run the half anyway.

Two weeks after that, I'll start training toward Flower City at the end of April. That will be training through the winter again. Chances are, it won't be as hard a winter as it was last year. But if it is, I know how to deal with it.


- Kevin

"Discipline is remembering what you want. " - David Campbell

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1/5/15 7:54 A

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I may be insane but I'm not stupid. Seriously, I have never sprained an ankle in over 40 years of running. Never pulled a muscle either. Doesn't cross my mind. Been lucky I know. Done both playing soccer and shooting basketball...

In that kind of cold you run slower since you are more bundled up. And you don't run in the wilderness. This run was from Minneapolis into St Paul and back with a partner at night. Yesterday it was -10 WC here in the KC area. Ran alone. My wife had a print out of my route and my ETA. I wore a Road ID. Ran into the wind (generally) on the way out and with the wind (generally) coming back. Ran through mainly residential areas. Lots of people in their cars. Freezing to death was the least of my worries if I collapsed by the side of the road. I was more worried about the drivers who hadn't cleaned off their windshields before they started out...

Eric
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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
1/4/15 7:00 P

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-50? Imagine you pulled a muscle or sprained an ankle (both a concern in winter conditions). You'd freeze before you were able to hobble to safety, no?

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1/4/15 6:42 P

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Grew up and went to college in Minnesota. I've come to the conclusion that it is never too cold to run outside. Key thing is to dress right. Coldest I ever ran in was -50 WC in a blizzard. Temp was -15. Modern fabrics make it a lot easier to run in the cold. What does make it hard to run is ice in the winter and living in KS that is a real problem. Easy to blow out a knee and ruin all the winter training. Going to have to check out the crampons.

I wear quality liner gloves and a cheap outer white cotton glove. For socks I just go with none cotton athletic socks. Usually I am cold for the first half mile or so and then I am fine.

Side note: Training in the cold is a psychological lift. Go out for a run on a cold day and you feel that you are doing things no one else is doing. Ran 5.5 today in the cold and saw no one. Big lift for the half in two weeks (Topeka to Auburn).

Eric
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GLORIAMAJDI's Photo GLORIAMAJDI Posts: 6,421
1/4/15 2:31 P

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Reading this with interest. I live in a somewhat milder climate but I am a wimp when it comes to cold and when it gets to 30 degrees, I don't want to go out and run. Fortunately snow isn't an issue as I hate that stuff and won't go out in it. I am looking at this for ideas about the gloves, socks, etc. I wear wool socks, but like someone else said, the wet gets in and it doesn't really get out.

Gloria

"but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint." Isaiah 40:31


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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
12/12/14 4:52 P

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I splurged and bought a new mitten recently: Mountain Hardware Plasmic Mitten. ($70 at REI but you can use a coupon plus you get another 10% back as a member at the end of the year.)

www.rei.com/product/872594/mountain-
ha
rdwear-plasmic-mittens


Pic makes it look heavy but it's lightweight and appropriate for running. No inner glove to futz with. Modest wicking lining for warmth, bonded to a shell that allows moisture to escape but blocks rain and wind. Conductive so it works with touch screens.

I've been using it for several weeks and my only complaints are:

- Sized small. My hands aren't XL but that's the size I had to buy for comfort!
- It's too warm for 32F. I found that it couldn't dispense all my hand-sweat at that temp. Hoping it pays off when temps are in the teens or lower. That's when I'll really need it.


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MALAMI518's Photo MALAMI518 SparkPoints: (121,869)
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8/25/14 8:31 P

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Thank you both so much for the suggestions. I need to stop stressing about the cold and just enjoy the weather that we have left, but I'm having a little trouble with that. Also, it's good to be prepared.

Beth
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AIMLESS_AM's Photo AIMLESS_AM Posts: 2,313
8/24/14 10:41 P

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I am totally not judging anyone for wearing gloves at 30 degrees. I do it too! My hands are always cold. For warmer cold days, costco sells cheap running gloves by Head that are fine. I transition to the Eddie Bauer convertible mittens when it gets colder. I also have a muffler by Buff (http://www.buffusa.com/sports/) that I wear on my neck or over my nose and mouth. I'm committed to my winter running!

- Amy

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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
8/24/14 9:25 P

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Malami, Check out these:
www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/11/be
st
-running-gloves-winter_n_4274072.html


In that list, the Brooks Adapt II and North Face both work the same way - a lightweight wicking glove with a shell that can provide extra warmth or hidden away in a built-in pocket. I have some Saucony gloves that are the same design.

For colder conditions, I change to lightweight fleece mittens such as:

www.columbia.com/youth-fast-trek-mit
te
n-1555741.html?dwvar_1555741_variatiR>onColor=605#q=mitten&start=11


No need to buy an expensive one like this. With a little hunting, you can find plenty of less expensive ones. Note that some fleece is wicking, some isn't.

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8/24/14 8:10 P

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I know that other runners seem to have much hotter hands than I do. But does anyone have any fairly light-weight, wicking glove recommendations for cold weather? The ones I have are good if it's around 30-degrees (and, yes, I need gloves at 30-degrees), but they don't cut it at all when it's colder than that. Last year our winter was much colder most days. I either suffered numb, painful hands or ran with giant uncomfortable gloves/mittens in layers. There were days that I even put hand warmers in there.

(I am already getting stressed about running in the winter weather. Though I do prefer the 60s-70s with low humidity to some of those hot summer runs that I've had.)

Edit: I just saw the recommendation for the Eddie Bauer convertible gloves. Thanks! I will look for those when winter gear becomes more readily available. Any other recommendations are also appreciated.

Edited by: MALAMI518 at: 8/24/2014 (20:12)
Beth
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8/17/14 10:18 P

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I did not run from mid December through March of the past winter b/c we had a terribly cold/snowy winter. This is the first summer running. I am not a humid/heat type runner. I was shocked at how the heat affected me this year and I'm actually looking forward to the cooler temps! I agree, your attire is extremely important. Invest in running pants, shirts, gloves and a hat. It is really important to have the correct materials when running in the cold weather. I can remember wearing two pairs of running pants and three to four layers on top as well. Layers are important b/c if you get to hot, you can take something off. Including the gloves and hat. I have trouble with my lungs, very susceptible to lung infections so I stayed indoors through the really cold weather and used my elliptical. It kept me in shape during those months and when I started running again I was stronger than every!!! I've learned cross training is a must for running!!! I helps you develop stronger cardio as well as muscles you use and do not use during running!! Good luck and have fun. You will need to find what works best for you!!

Don't put off till tomorrow what you can accomplish today!


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AIMLESS_AM's Photo AIMLESS_AM Posts: 2,313
8/13/14 8:39 P

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These are the ones that I use:

http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/pr
oduct_Petzl-Spiky-Plus-Crampon_1001203
1_10208_10000001_-1_

I love them. They should pay me a stipend for how often I recommend them to people.

Oh, P.S., you can't see the front but the rubberized part covers your whole toe. It provides some water protection. Not a ton, but some.

Edited by: AIMLESS_AM at: 8/13/2014 (20:39)
- Amy

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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
8/13/14 8:14 P

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AIMLESS, Could you post a link to the cleat+cover combos you are referring to?

Spurred by this great discussion, I also decided to give more thought to combining waterproof running shoes + waterproof gaiters. To my dismay, I couldn't find any waterproof trail shoe for neutral gaits. All the waterproof trail shoes are for overpronaters. How odd!

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AIMLESS_AM's Photo AIMLESS_AM Posts: 2,313
8/13/14 7:23 P

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I haven't had success with duct tape either. It doesn't stay on properly and isn't water proof enough for our winter gushers. However, some of the cleats they make that cover your shoes keep some water out. I have found no good solution. If you do, Sunshine, please share!

- Amy

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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
8/13/14 6:37 P

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SUNSHINE, I use duct tape a lot during the winter. Good for keeping out drafts, not so much for keeping out water though. The glue just isn't secure enough. In fact, if your feet get warm enough, the glue will release. If you are talking about a light rain, you'll be ok but if you do stream crossings, duct tape simply isn't waterproof. Seems like it should be but there just isn't enough surface area from the mesh of running shoes for the glue to adhere well.

So if it's 30-40F, I'll put duct tape around the toe box as you suggest. Below that (or if I'm running through snow), I'll wrap duct tape all the way around the shoe.

Edited by: PASTAFARIAN at: 8/13/2014 (18:38)
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TIMOTHY53's Photo TIMOTHY53 Posts: 902
8/13/14 1:17 A

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Dress in layers. And when it's still too cold, suck it up and use the treadmill.

Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible. -- St Francis of Assisi
SUNSHINE20113's Photo SUNSHINE20113 SparkPoints: (41,529)
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8/12/14 5:38 P

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I had forgotten about the wet socks! There were days when my feet would get numb because of how icy cold and wet my socks had become!
I don't get much snow, it just gets very wet and windy. Rains constantly, with very strong winds. I have a good wind-breaker, will look into the gloves and also some kind of waterproof running tights. Also what about your ears and nose?

In thinking about wet socks - what about duct tape over the front of the shoe? Surely that would keep the rain out?


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AIMLESS_AM's Photo AIMLESS_AM Posts: 2,313
8/12/14 2:42 P

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I didn't even know there was such a thing as waterproof socks, but I'm not surprised. There seems to be a product for every need, especially in the running world! I googled and they are expensive, but I might invest in a pair for the sake of experimenting.

We have waterproof gaiters, but they start at the top of the shoe near the tongue, so I don't know how effective they would be for keeping your toes dry. My strategy last winter was just to cringe through every splash and puddle and invest in cozy wool socks for after my run to try to compensate.

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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
8/12/14 1:26 P

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You didn't provide a link so I googled Brooks Gore-Tex and only came up with shoes, not socks. But the reviews are same complaints I've always read about: Water stays in as easily as it stays out. Step in a puddle 4" deep and the shoe fills up.Your feet will be soaked for the rest of the day.

I read some comments suggesting combining them with gaiters but I have no experience with gaiters. I always thought they were mostly for keeping pebbles out. Are there really waterproof gaiters?

I think a waterproof sock makes more sense because you can get them much higher. The only question is: Which are reliable?

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AIMLESS_AM's Photo AIMLESS_AM Posts: 2,313
8/12/14 12:26 P

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Last winter I sort of resigned myself to wet feet, but I've heard good things about the Brooks Gore-Tex line. I didn't buy a pair last year because I didn't know if I'd give up and resort to the treadmill, but I may try them this winter.

- Amy

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PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
8/12/14 2:59 A

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AIMLESS, Good suggestions. (My hands work the same as yours, too!)

One winter issue I still haven't resolved: When I have to splash through a water crossing and the temp is below 40F, my toes go numb. I wear technical socks to no avail. I've seen a lot of ads for waterproof socks but the reviews are inconsistent. Some people say that waterproof socks work great too many people say they don't work.

So I hope for temps above 40F or well below 32F so that water crossings ice over and my feet don't get wet!

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THE_SHAKESHAFT's Photo THE_SHAKESHAFT SparkPoints: (0)
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8/12/14 1:09 A

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I find the cooler weather moving into the autumn and winter months actually helps with my training. I overheat REALLY easily so running in the cold is great for me.

Life is for living!

Don't let yourself down.


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AIMLESS_AM's Photo AIMLESS_AM Posts: 2,313
8/11/14 7:44 P

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I live in Alaska and totally love running in winter. I'd third the recommendation for cleats for your shoes. I like Petzl Spiky Plus because they are easy to slip on and off and have a very low profile, so they don't disrupt my stride too much and transition reasonably well from ice to clear roadways.

Also, wicking gloves are essential. My hands alternate from being really, really cold to really, really sweaty, so I use convertible gloves that Eddie Bauer sells in the winter. I tried to get you a link but apparently I'm the only person shopping winter gloves in August.

A good rainproof windbreaker is also important, because we get a lot of cold rain and wind. On really cold but dry days, I love fleece. And don't forget to stay visible! Those nerdy reflective vests work like a charm.

There is nothing better than being the first person on the road in new snowfall. Enjoy it!



- Amy

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amywpaige

Adventures in Alaska Running:
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HEATHERLEIGH44's Photo HEATHERLEIGH44 Posts: 738
8/11/14 6:48 P

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I agree, proper clothing makes all the difference. There are a lot of clothes designed specifically for cold and snowy temps. I live in Chicago and still was out running in the snow and negative temps and rarely felt cold. On days when the wind chill was low I stuck to shorter runs.

To address the snow and ice, try to find a place to run where there is snow removal. Several public parks in my area were cleared and I wouldnt have to try to run in high drifts. Proper shoe attire such as yaktrax is also ideal so you dont fall. I broke my arm this past spring when I felt on some ice on a day when I failed to put the yaktrax on.

If the weather is too severe, there is always the treadmill or if you hate it as much as I do, find a public indoor running spot. We have several public facilities that allow walkers/runners on indoor tracks. It is not ideal but is better than putting yourself in danger.

PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 2,211
8/11/14 4:12 P

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1) Learn how to dress for the weather. Or to put more spin on the topic, think of it as an opportunity to shop more. :-)

2) Shoe prep can make a huge difference. Duct tape, screw shoes, etc.

3) I do winter long runs in the afternoon. By then, temps can rise 20-30 degrees which makes things so much more pleasant.



Edited by: PASTAFARIAN at: 8/11/2014 (16:12)
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SUNSHINE20113's Photo SUNSHINE20113 SparkPoints: (41,529)
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8/11/14 3:39 P

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This has been a good summer season for me. I've managed to build up to regular 2hr long runs and feel like I have the half marathon distance under my belt now BUT I'm becoming aware of the change in season and I'm starting to think about how to keep up the training, rather than cut it down and then have to build myself up again next Spring.

Last winter I struggled with going out for longer runs. I kept up the outdoor training the whole season, but it was mainly 5-10km distances. The weather just became too wet, windy and cold for me to bear being out longer than that. I began picking that up again in about Feb/March. For those of you who live in colder, wetter winter climates, how do you maintain the longer runs? Or do you do some other type of cross-training instead?



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