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GABBY308's Photo GABBY308 Posts: 10,271
8/21/12 11:03 A

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When you listed your iciest areas you forgot to mention Buffalo NY and blizzards LOL!!
I can't help - It was down to 58 degrees last week when we were in the Alleghany mountains and I was freezing. I'm the opposite and love heat. I wish you luck.






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GEORGIAGAL's Photo GEORGIAGAL Posts: 371
2/12/12 8:22 A

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Another good resource would be the forum at Escapees....http://www.rvnetwork.com.

We always try to avoid cold as much as possible, I can't even imagine living up north in the winter. It's in the 30's in Texas this morning and we've got the electric heaters running full blast ~ LOL!

I'd look for a motorhome that has the Extreme Weather package built in...they have better insulation and are built for cold weather.

Good Luck

GeorgiaGal


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CAM2438's Photo CAM2438 Posts: 4,646
2/9/12 9:13 A

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I agree with Ann. The Good Sam webis a good one for answers to a lot of RV problems

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ANNINSD Posts: 5,878
8/11/11 9:50 P

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I think you'd get some good answers to your questions if you asked them on the RV.net website. It is a Good Sam website and lots of smart long time RVers on there. There are seperate forums for different types of RVs. You probably could also get info on the type of RV you are looking for. If you can find a gently cared for older motor home you'd have good living space but with an RV that old you also can expect problems.

Ann

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JACQUEBO's Photo JACQUEBO Posts: 8,504
8/11/11 3:51 P

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I've never done boondocking, but to winterize for the cold and live in the MH at the same time you will probably need to have something to put around the outside of the home when you are parked to keep the wind and ice, etc from coming under and freezing up your lines. Most of the water tanks have built in heaters. I would imagine you'll need to make sure you keep yours on. You can use a small electric heater inside to help keep the inside lines open or keep a small trickle running in the faucets. If it is a diesel, you'll need to make sure to have a block heater for your engine, that might not hurt even with a gas engine. If you are connected to an outside water source, wrap your hose with insulation, you can even buy some that are heated if you like. These are the only things I can think of off the top of my head.

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EELKAT's Photo EELKAT SparkPoints: (0)
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8/11/11 11:50 A

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I'm not new to "winter camping" or 24/7 year round boondocking. I live in an area that gets 5 to 7 months of snow (more on a "cold" year), and usually spends 2 of those months at temps of -20F to -48F before wind chill factors (and living on the coast, we get a lot of high winds all year long). I lived fulltime in a tent since 2006 (no electricity, no running water, etc), during that time we had 3 blizzards (one which buried my tent under 9 feet of snow), 2 ice storms, and 5 hurricanes. So, extreme winter camping is a lifestyle for me. I love the cold and snow, I avoid the heat and hot climates.

I'm upgrading. I'm moving out of the tent and into a motorhome. I have not bought it yet, but the one I'm planning to buy is a 1988 Class A 31' Georgie Boy TravelMaster. (Which has already been customized for fulltime boondocking, thus why I'm trying for this one first.) If they sell it before I come up with the cash to pay for it, I've got a few "back-up RVs" on my list, all are 1980s Class As. (After spending 2 years going in and out of every new and used RV, MH, TT, 5Th in the state I came to the conclusion I prefer the Class As of the '80s.)

So, here's the thing. I've never lived in a motorhome before. This is going to be a totally new thing for me (as well as being the LARGEST living space I've had in 36 years - I lived in a 16'x9' beach cabin before the tent.). And me, living in the types of places I like to live I'm going to have to make sure it gets winterized for some heavy duty super cold regions. (Once in the motorhome I plan to spend a lot of time boondocking between Maine, Quebec, Yukon, Alaska, Colorado, etc, exploring the coldest iciest parts of North America - it'll likely never see a warm day again once I own it!).

So my question is: what the heck do I need to do to my motorhome to winterize it? Does anyone have any advice on "RV Boondocking" in extreme cold regions?










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