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LADYIRISH317's Photo LADYIRISH317 Posts: 56,368
3/13/13 4:00 P

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Actually, significant progress has occurred in Anglo-Irish relations. During Ireland's recent fiscal crisis, England was Ireland's best friend. And on a one-to-one basis, the Irish and English get along great. It's just when you throw politics into it that things get dicey.

"...there's some good in this world, Mr. Frodo, and it's worth fighting for."

"We're children of a fighting race that never yet has known disgrace." (The Soldiers' Song, Irish national anthem)

"Every day above ground is a good day." (Chef Justin Kennedy of New Orleans, on Chopped)

Please visit my blog:
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FLOWERDALEJEWEL's Photo FLOWERDALEJEWEL Posts: 40,155
3/13/13 3:47 A

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From Irish to Swiss, now there's a fork in the road!!

I've got Irish on the maternal side and English and Welsh on the paternal side.

I know the Irish crofters were left with very little after the upper crust got their share and that caused the antipathy between the English and the Irish that survives to this very day.

I've never understood how one can hang on to such dislikes for generations and generations. Greece and Turkey, Serbia and Kosovo/Croatia, Hutus and Tutsis and many more hang on to hatreds for centuries.

Peace and long life - Jules

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ZENANDNOW's Photo ZENANDNOW SparkPoints: (68,476)
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3/12/13 11:49 A

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Swiss steak? Beef stroganoff? emoticon

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SIRIRADHA1's Photo SIRIRADHA1 SparkPoints: (15,104)
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3/12/13 11:38 A

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Funny story: My dad always said we were Irish. I did a LOT of research on Irish history and developed an absolute loathing for the greed that actually brought on The Great Hunger. Every St. Patrick's Day, I'd stay up late watching Irish history on tv and then toddle off to try to trace our family tree back to Ireland. It always hit a brick wall just a couple of generations back from my dad.

Until...a few years ago, I went to the computer, typed in my paternal grandfather's name and hit the jackpot! Dad's cousin and his family had put up a most exquisitely informative genealogy tracing us back all the way to the 1600's. We are Swiss! I have no idea what we're supposed to eat on March 17 now!

May all sentient beings be happy!


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LADYIRISH317's Photo LADYIRISH317 Posts: 56,368
3/12/13 9:59 A

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Besides, a lot of food was being produced in Ireland at the time. Most of it had to be shipped to absentee landlords in England.

"...there's some good in this world, Mr. Frodo, and it's worth fighting for."

"We're children of a fighting race that never yet has known disgrace." (The Soldiers' Song, Irish national anthem)

"Every day above ground is a good day." (Chef Justin Kennedy of New Orleans, on Chopped)

Please visit my blog:
www.cuisinequests.blogspot.com/


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FLOWERDALEJEWEL's Photo FLOWERDALEJEWEL Posts: 40,155
3/12/13 1:53 A

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Actually doing a piece of corned beef in the pressure cooker now as I type. It's great to just have with a salad especially over here where it's as hot as Hell at the moment.

Our corned beef over here is a corned silverside, which is the hindmost part of the leg and is perfect for sandwiches when either hot or cold.

I don't know if I agree that cabbage is the backbone of the Irish, an awful lot of Irish people died when the great potato blight occurred in Ireland, I don't recall any "great cabbage blight" in history
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Peace and long life - Jules

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LADYIRISH317's Photo LADYIRISH317 Posts: 56,368
3/11/13 10:44 P

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Thanks for the information! I'm Irish and as proud as (Hades) of it.

"...there's some good in this world, Mr. Frodo, and it's worth fighting for."

"We're children of a fighting race that never yet has known disgrace." (The Soldiers' Song, Irish national anthem)

"Every day above ground is a good day." (Chef Justin Kennedy of New Orleans, on Chopped)

Please visit my blog:
www.cuisinequests.blogspot.com/


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ZENANDNOW's Photo ZENANDNOW SparkPoints: (68,476)
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3/11/13 2:54 P

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* "Corned" doesn't refer to maize, but rather to the large salt granules that were once used to dry cure meats. Just about any small, seed-shaped thing used to be called a corn, which is why we refer to whole barley as barleycorn and to calluses on toes as corns as well.

* The "beef" in question is brisket, a heavily worked cut from the lower chest of the cow, composed of the superficial and deep pectorals. Since it's made of tough stuff requiring hours of long, moist cooking, briskets from the pre-refrigerator days were typically cured so that they would survive the warmer months.

* Once the fires of winter were lit, the brisket would bathe in the soup pot, where days of simmering would dissolve its connective tissue into lip-smacking goodness.

* Although the Irish city Cork was once known for its many corning and curing concerns, most of the beef produced there wound up in English, not Irish, mouths. As a result, corned beef was something of an aspirational dish. Most Irishmen wouldn't try it until reaching America.

* The mass migrations of the 19th and early 20th centuries put plenty of Irishmen in close proximity to Jews, a group that had developed a cuisine based on efficiency and millennia of constant movement -- which is to say they had intimate knowledge of the economical and oft-overlooked brisket.

* These Jewish neighbors were also expert picklers. When it came to brisket, kosher delicatessens added allspice, juniper berry, mustard seed, and black pepper -- all the flavorings still used in today's corned beef.

* Corned beef's classic pink hue comes from potassium nitrate, or saltpeter, a natural preservative dating back to at least the Middle Ages. Saltpeter "fixes" the reddish-pink color of meat.

* And then there's the cabbage. Whereas your average Irishman didn't eat much meat in Ireland, cabbage was born on the British Isles where the humidity and cold weather form a cabbage paradise. Despite all the potato hype, cabbage is the foundation upon which true Irish cuisine is built. Luckily, New York is one of the top cabbage-producing states.

* So is corned beef and cabbage Irish? No. Is it American? Heck yes! And it's the perfect dish to soak up all that Guinness you'll be drinkin' come March 17, the day we're all at least a little bit Irish.

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