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HYATTI1's Photo HYATTI1 SparkPoints: (55,189)
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4/26/12 11:52 P

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Thanks...he is my cutie.

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4/26/12 9:50 P

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I looked on your SP HYATTI1 and Biggie looks awesome for his age. I hope Cracker keeps trucking like that. I have a feeling she will. :)

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4/26/12 10:20 A

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51 is not the correct record....there was a horse out in the west somewhere that lived to be 72 -- and he was still doing trail rides...I read that in one of the horse magazines. There is a horse now that is 61 living in Wisconsin..... and there was a mustang that was trained by the prison there in Nevada, then adopted out to a family, then sold, and went on to be a world class Dressage horse. He as far as I know is still around and and he also is up there in his 50's.

I run a rescue for horse and at least one a year we use Biggie in our expo....where we take him and demonstrate how to care for an older horse. He has quite a reputation here in Michigan. Our MOTTO is that even a backyard pony can be a blessing if taken care of the right way. Biggie had a sister Sunny, she lived to be 48 and passed away two years ago. Well she didn't pass away we had to put her down. She went into winter fine but coming out one day she laid down and could not get up. I didn't have the heart to make her and force her so I chose to let her go.

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GLC2009's Photo GLC2009 Posts: 1,305
4/25/12 10:22 P

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www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-210
81
89/Worlds-oldest-horse-Shayne-51-livR>es-Brentwood--town-record-breaking-d
og.html


the oldest living horse right now is 51!! i'm serious, call somebody. people love to know how to take care of their pets so they live as long as possible. good genes and good horsekeeping.

there was a cool horse named elmer bandit that died a couple years ago at 38 years old. he was still competing in endurance rides until a couple months before he died. he had a world record of 20,720 competitive riding miles.

Gail -- She believed she could, so she did.


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4/25/12 6:24 P

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He was born May 11 1956....he and I did barrels up until 1968...when he retired from the circuit. He became my trail horse and I taught my kids to ride on him in the 70's and then my grand kids starting in the 90's. In 2000 we retired him again, then brought him back in 2006 when I taught my youngest granddaughter to do barrels. He doesn't have the speed but he takes one look at the barrels and he thinks he can fly. He has not been in competition since the late 60's but around here he was still working his magic on very young kids up until last year. He teaches balance, range and motion with his eyes closed. And no I was not joking or made any typo's when I said 56 he will be 56 on May 11.

He was born with me and will die with me...we are just waiting to see who goes first. He thinks he has my number I'm sure of it.


Joanna

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JRAUTIO's Photo JRAUTIO Posts: 1,704
4/25/12 9:42 A

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I think the oldest horse on record was 51. Hoping 56 is a typo, but kudos if he raced to 53! :)

~~Julie~~


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GLC2009's Photo GLC2009 Posts: 1,305
4/25/12 6:24 A

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gee HYATTI1, 56 year old horse that raced until it was 53? that's one for the record books. you better call ripley's believe it or not.

Gail -- She believed she could, so she did.


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4/25/12 12:57 A

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I'm and old school horse sense person. I believe if they are healthy enough to ride they need to do so and have a job to do at any age. I have found that it keeps them young at heart. I have a registered 56 year old APPY that is still moving pretty solid. Each year for the last 10 years I think is going to be his last and he comes out of winter with some weight on him and still moving around. He was raced up until three years ago. He has a touch of arthritis but over all for his age he is a real trouper. He is solid as a rock and has legs like a 15 year old. He was a runner of barrels in his youth. He took up swimming and I think it keeps him healthy. No teeth left and his lower lip wiggles when he walks and his eyes are a little sunken in but overall he is my baby and he still looks like a stud muffin to me. I will try to upload a photo in my gallery of him but I have been having trouble for about a week with the SP site so I can’t make any promises.

Joanna


EDIT NOTE: I managed to get a photo of him and of my blind girl and her seeing eye goat.

Edited by: HYATTI1 at: 4/25/2012 (01:03)
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KPHMITTEN's Photo KPHMITTEN SparkPoints: (0)
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4/25/12 12:42 A

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I did forget, she went most of her life barefoot except for a few years we were doing heavy jumping/cross country and she wore front shoes. We put Morrisen Rollers on her front legs after her sesamoidian injury because she wouldn't weight bare on it. She does now but the roll of the shoe makes her range of motion easier since we did find a tiny amount of ringbone and slight navicular changes in the x-rays/ultrasounds when trying to diagnose the injury.

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4/25/12 12:39 A

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We're still rehabbing but we're pretty much out of the woods. I just have to be careful not to turn her out in muddy conditions, but she is allowed out. She's the only horse with her own stall run though and she has two BLM mustang colts next to run (they haven't dropped yet, the vet was just out) that she keeps in check, plus she can visit her OTTB boyfriend when he's in his stall by hanging her head in his window. We call her Grandma Creeper since she's 25 and her boyfriend is only in his early teens.

I also have to be careful what kind of terrain I ride her through, keep her booted in case she strikes a tendon, no jumping, no tight circles, etc. We mostly plod along trails. Some days she's sound enough for some trotting but we haven't cantered yet. She's 25 and the vet said that riding her at a walk is doing her good to keep her moving, muscle/bone/mental health but due to her age and not being able to heal as fully as a younger horse, we might not really get to canter again. It stinks but she's my girl; my first horse, show pony, etc. She deserves a nice retirement. If she'd been younger, she'd have pulled through no issues. She has racing lines and the ultrasound showed old scar tissue in her suspensory - we hypothesized she probably bowed her suspensory in training and they pulled her out because she was a broodmare when I got her. Up until she hit 23, we never had a soundness issue in the 9 years I did heavy riding, training, and jumping. Go figure she'd hurt herself in semi-retirement in the field!

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4/25/12 12:13 A

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KPHMITTEN sounds like you are right on top of the problem. How is she doing now or is she still in rehab? I like your color scheme..sounds like my miss match granddaughter. She wears two different socks and nothing that matches her outfits but it works for her and she is cute as a button. I will keep that in mind next time I have to wrap in FLEX wrap.

Joanna

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4/24/12 4:56 P

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I've had to rehab a superficial tendon bow with my mare and a disrupted sesamoidian ligament within 2 years of each other. Right when we started upping work outs and she was given small turnout privledges, a new farrier I used because we'd moved gave her a completely botched trim job. Our best guess is that caused her to land wrong and voila. Both happened in the same leg.

It's a lot of rehab. A lot of time. Standing wraps/strict stall rest for three months. She was only allowed out into the aisle for stall cleaning, then back in. Three more months of 15-20 minute walks. Toward the end, I was allowed to hop on for the walks. Three more months of 30 minutes walks and 10 minute trots. The first one we just did stall rest for. The second one we added shockwave therapy, 4 rounds 10 days apart. The good thing is the second injury we were at a new barn and the people were nice enough to make a small run out for her once I was given the okay to do that (about 5 months out).

She was given free choice grass hay, I got her Uncle Jimmy's hanging treats and Likits to keep her occupied, we started stretching exercises and massage to keep her muscles from getting completely flabby, etc. A lot of grooming and overall TLC. Her grain wasn't cut back because she's older and turned into a hard keeper in her old age - plus she likes to hurt herself to get the winter off, so I did keep her heavily blanketed since she couldn't move around much. Since it's summer, get a fan of his stall to keep him cool and comfortable, but also keep some of the flies away so he won't get irritated about that. For my own amusement, I got fun colored wraps and would alternate for holidays (black and orange on each leg for halloween, yellow and orange or red for Thanksgiving, red and green for Christmas, etc) on them.

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3/29/12 4:26 P

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Thoroughbreds are a little high strung on grain when not in working condition. We have a half Arab/Saddlebred with an attitude problem. She is stalled at night also being a show horse my granddaughter doesn’t want her out all night. If she doesn’t like the horse in the stall next to her she is a kicker. Her temper has caused her several problems over the years.

She has kicked out boards, kicked and caught her fetlock in between bars (we had to cut her out of that one, I was sure she was going to break a leg before we could get her down), she kicked up over stalls and got her leg caught on the other side. Tore up her under belly and leg trying to drag it back over. We had to use an electric saw and cut down the boards to release her leg. Then wait for weeks during the healing. This mare climbs the stalls at the shows if you take her mate away from her. She can’t stand to be alone without which ever mate she is friendly with at the moment. We put up with it because she is so beautiful in the ring and wins.

I also have an aging old old appy. He has been my horse since birth. I never believed in stalls when they are healthy so he was allowed to live out in rain, snow, sleet and sunshine all year around. The past few years because of his age I start the fall by bring him in. I just can’t stand the thought of him out there in the cold night. Apparently he doesn’t share my concern. I can hear him banging on his stall all night long. He just sits there and bangs and after a few days…he is not only banging he is swaying back and forth. I end up putting him out thinking I will come out one morning and find him down in the snow or something. I guess I have to adjust that it will be his way of going. He just doesn’t want to be inside for any length of time. He will stay in for a while…to be bathed, clipped, farrier, vet check but when night comes….turn him loose.

I have been lucky as to not have to suffer all the problems that can develop with stall kickers. Mine are all silly horses. We have one that wants to put his front legs in the trough and play with the water, we have one that finds gates and shoves his head through them bending up the fence gates or knocking them loose so the horses can escape. Unfortunately he has not been lucky being stuck in the fence head first it has been too heavy to take with him. We have one that loves to test the pond for crossing, she fell through one winter and it took two jeeps and some chains to get her out. (That’s a story in itself)

Horses, I can go on and on and on. But, I love them what can I say.

Joanna


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GLC2009's Photo GLC2009 Posts: 1,305
3/29/12 2:40 P

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reeny -- interesting. my horse was a rescue and he also had an abcess in his hoof that came out soon after i got him. when i first saw him he was very friendly and sweet, then a few months after i got him, he turned into a holy terror. i wondered what happened to the nice horse i first met. then one day the abcess blew out of his hoof wall. so, obviously he had been in pain and that is why he was such a misery. after it burst he started to be the nice horse again.
i'm just glad that they have the tools to pinpoint the problem. imagine being able to bring out a portable ultrasound. how great is that?
i'm getting him a jollyball for his stall and maybe i'll order one of those balls you put treats in for amusement.
maybe he'll be lucky and by the time i can ride again, i'll have lost more weight. emoticon
--gail

Gail -- She believed she could, so she did.


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REENY414's Photo REENY414 SparkPoints: (0)
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3/29/12 10:02 A

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Joanna ~ That is so wonderful. It made me tear up a bit! :)

Gail ~ I know how you feel. It seems like the second after I adopted my horse he went lame and was out of commission for three months. We didn't know what the deal was, until one very perceptive vet thought he might have canker, and sure enough he cut away at the hoof a bit and there it was! Those three months were very long and very boring for both of us, but luckily I had other horses to borrow and most of all, it was a chance for me and Honor to bond. It was a critical time in our relationship together, and looking back on it I'm actually kind of lucky it happened. I had to clean out his hoof and put medication on it daily, and used it as an opportunity to spend the hour or so I would have been riding him on just brushing and petting him, talking to him, and telling him that he was my horse and I wouldn't give up on him just because things got hard. He was a rescue from an auction, sent away because he wasn't making money and couldn't jump anymore; his entire life was people giving up on him because he couldn't do what they wanted. I think our bonding time was important to him because it showed him that he isn't just a horse for me to ride for my pleasure; he's my companion and my partner in crime, and I love him whether I can ride him or not.

He recently went lame again and he's been out of commission for about two weeks, first with a pulled tendon and currently with an abscess, but I'm not as devastated by lameness anymore. He's got many miles on him and he's going to have bumps and scrapes, and I'm okay with that. He isn't a spring chicken and I don't expect him to be. If it's less than three months I'm a lucky duck, and I appreciate the opportunity to spend time with him in a different context.

It's not to say that it doesn't suck to not be able to ride, and I can completely relate to your frustration (we had just started cantering together, ugh!) But look at it this way: his lameness is temporary, and in 8 months you'll be able to ride again and appreciate it more than ever. You get an excuse to just hang out with him and enjoy his company, and although I can't speak to eight months, three went by for me faster than I expected them to.

Good luck with him and I'll pray for his speedy recovery!

~ Reeny

Edited by: REENY414 at: 3/29/2012 (10:02)
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JRAUTIO's Photo JRAUTIO Posts: 1,704
3/29/12 8:05 A

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That is an absolutely fantastic story, Joanna. What dedication to a wonderful animal, who is proving he was worth the effort!
Gail, sounds like you will just need to find a lot of patience as you wait for healing. Not the best start to the spring and summer months! :( Great, though, that he should make a full recovery.

~~Julie~~


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SNOBENSON1's Photo SNOBENSON1 Posts: 1,126
3/29/12 6:22 A

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Joanna - What a wonderful story!

Gail - I am so sorry about your horse and wish him a speedy recovery.

Sno

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GLC2009's Photo GLC2009 Posts: 1,305
3/29/12 4:09 A

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wow, that's certainly a huge amount of work you did for that horse. what a lucky horse to have people who think outside the box for ways to heal him.
thanks for the feedback. i feel lucky now. my horse is allowed to go in his paddock (because he kicks the walls if he is in and that would hurt him more) when the others go out and the vet said bandaging won't help.

Gail -- She believed she could, so she did.


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HYATTI1's Photo HYATTI1 SparkPoints: (55,189)
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3/29/12 3:31 A

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I've had a few horses come in that had leg injuries and it wasn't easy to entertain them. We have always had multiple horses and when they were left in for any reason of course they feel left out and it's very hard on them.

A little of a year ago my youngest granddaughters yearling foundered...we don't know what from but he did. He was in a field with a lot of other horses and none of them foundered and he wasn't on any fresh grass...he had been out there for a few weeks. Anyway he foundered so bad that we thought we would have to put him down...he was a huge horse and rotation had started. My granddaughter cried her eyes out begging us not to give up on him. So we built a pulley and lifted him off his front feet. We wrapped them in wet ice packs 4 and 5 times daily trying to get the heat down. It took several days just for that. After three weeks when he was able to stand we didn't want more rotation so we put cast on him that we specially made to come on and off...we lowered him just enough to touch the ground but at no time did we allow him to put weight on his front legs. We kept him like that for almost 4 months. He hated being in there alone so we would take turns and leave in a horse or two with him. He could spin in his pulley around but could not walk or put weight. After four months we let him out of the pulley but still kept him in his stall so he couldn't run and do too much. During this time we removed all grain and he ate just a little bit of hay...he did loose a few pounds during this time almost 200 I would say but he slowly came around. We trimmed him three times before he was allowed to go out...and then we walked him daily around the yard by hand for the first three weeks. It was a total of 192 days he was isolated to his stall and minimal walking. We hung balls from the ceiling for him to play with...we hung his treats up high for him to get at...we spent a lot of time brushing him in the stall and grooming him. We dry bathed him in cool weather and ran a hose in and bathed him in the heat of the summer. All of our stall floors are wood and have mats over them so it was easy enough to bath him after removing all debris and cleaning out his stall. The grand baby spent hours with him when she was here on weekends and holidays and part of the summer.

The good news is that he is doing very very well...and as a two year old almost three he is well on his way to being a wonderful horse for my now 11 year old granddaughter. She has been riding him since she was 9 and believe it or not she has been the only one on his back up until this last month. We worked with her to break him, teach him cues, and do a little trail riding. He never bucked, reared, or bolted with her. He let her do what she wanted and they are just exquisite together. She wants to show him this coming season but, now he is kind of lazy and doesn't want to always pick up the right lead when it comes to the canter so we now have my oldest granddaughter on him putting on finishing touches.

We get a lot of visitors to our barn during the year and we have had offers to buy him for as much as 6500 but to my little granddaughter he is worth a million so he is not for sale.

Don't give up or get discouraged....things have a way of working out or they don't. As a horse lover you just do what you need to do and hope for the best. Good luck, let me know from time to time how he is doing.

NOTE: Our Penny (SAVANNA's PRETTY PENNY) is back to his huge self...at 16.1 and about 1250 lbs

Joanna

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GLC2009's Photo GLC2009 Posts: 1,305
3/29/12 2:21 A

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my horse has been lame for 2 months. i had a vet out in the beginning and then had them back on monday. on monday the vet did an ultrasound on his leg and he has some kind of tendon or ligament injury (i'm waiting for the vets email to remember what she said it was).

but, the important part is he is on the disabled list for 8 MONTHS!!! holy cow. he's already been lame for 2 months.

she said in 3 months i can start walking him for 20 minutes a day. she is going to email me a rehab itinerary.

anyway, what a drag. he wasn't even doing anything when he hurt himself, just cantering loose in a smooth arena. he didn't trip, buck, wasn't on a curve, just galloping in a straight line and all of a sudden he stopped and was holding his foot in the air. and that was that!

at least he is going to get better. thank god. but, still, that's a long time for him to be out of commission especially with spring coming.

i'm going have to figure out how to entertain him and me during this time. any ideas from anyone, love to hear them.
--gail

Gail -- She believed she could, so she did.


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