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BAILEYS7OF9's Photo BAILEYS7OF9 SparkPoints: (168,337)
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3/23/12 5:12 P

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very :0(





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JRAUTIO's Photo JRAUTIO Posts: 1,704
3/22/12 12:31 P

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That had to be a hard decision, TX. I'm glad you kept at least ONE horse!

~~Julie~~


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TXGRANDMA's Photo TXGRANDMA SparkPoints: (316,869)
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3/22/12 11:59 A

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The horse market is in bad condition! Medium priced horses now have NO market, as a rule. When you get into the top show horses, they are still bringing money.

Down here in Texas, if you have a roping or cutting prospect, you can still get decent money for it, but no other horse is worth much. We recently had to donate most of our herd to good homes. I refused to just take them to a sale and let them go to the highest bidder. I was afraid they would never have a good meal again.

We dispersed most of our horses so that we could travel more, no other reason. It was just a bad time econimically to do it, but the right time in our lives for us. I have had horses since I was 10 years old.

We did keep one filly for me to ride, and also still have our stallion. I wouldn't sell him to anywhere where he would be stalled up again, as he really enjoys his freedom. It is a rough time right now..........If you find a good home for your horse, just have to do the best you can and go on...........

emoticon

Know God, Know Peace,

No God, No Peace


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JRAUTIO's Photo JRAUTIO Posts: 1,704
3/22/12 11:46 A

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Ugh! Painful, BAILEYS.... :(

~~Julie~~


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BAILEYS7OF9's Photo BAILEYS7OF9 SparkPoints: (168,337)
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3/22/12 11:17 A

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I agree with REENY414, weight has nothing to do with a rider being able to sit a buck.

also, not all auctions are bad. I unfortunately had to sell my 1/2 Arab show horse at an auction. He went for a steal. One of the worse days of my life....





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SHRLZI's Photo SHRLZI Posts: 4,088
2/20/12 11:52 A

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Your comment about the horse not caring -- I had a gelding who was an angel (well, at least pretty well-behaved) with girls and women, but any time a man got on him he would put them through quite a test! not sure whether it was gender or weight, I never tried putting a heavy woman on him.

...there is a place in you where you have never been wounded, where there's still a sureness in you, where there's a seamlessness in you, and where there is a confidence and tranquility in you. ~John O'Donohue
being.publicradio.org/programs/2010/
inner-landscape/transcript.shtml


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JRAUTIO's Photo JRAUTIO Posts: 1,704
2/20/12 7:40 A

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My guess is that this horse was sent to the auction because he was a problem to work with (the bucking). I, too, can say that I've never seen a horse much care what the size of the rider was -- if he's going to buck, he's going to buck whether it's a large man or a small woman. And I honestly don't think the rider's size has anything to do with whether you can sit the buck -- it's depends on experience, skill, balance, how hard the horse is bucking, etc. I've ridden a good many horses that bucked here and there, but have been tossed more times than I like to think about, too. Ouch! emoticon

~~Julie~~


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GLC2009's Photo GLC2009 Posts: 1,305
2/19/12 4:04 P

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i also support rescue. my horse came from a rescue, who rescued him from the auction where he would have gone for dog food. and he's got a great personality and definitely didn't deserve dog food.
i do believe that the average jo shouldn't buy from an auction. and if the person who bought from the auction bought poorly and doesn't want the horse, they probably should just suck up the financial loss of what they paid and do the horse a good turn and give it to a rescue place. now if there is something really wrong with they horse and they know it would never be useful, they should think of spending the money and euthanizing it.
i think that would be kinder than just sending it back to auction and either it gets passed on to some other person to cause trouble and maybe someone gets hurt or it goes down a path of stress and perhaps cruelty that ends at the meat processors. and that's just cruel for any horse.
people who turn a blind eye and think the horse will do okay and perhaps be a nice lawn ornament are just fooling themselves. there are way too many horses people are trying to pass along as nice lawn ornaments. no one wants them (maybe a couple people do). horses are bloody expensive and in this day and age, there's not many people who can take on a useless horse just cuz they're pretty.

Gail -- She believed she could, so she did.


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REENY414's Photo REENY414 SparkPoints: (0)
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2/19/12 2:21 P

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I haven't really had a ton of experience with bucking horses but a good rider can sit a buck regardless of weight; a saddle doesn't keep you on, weight doesn't keep you on, your seat keeps you on. Granted, some horses are very athletic and can be too athletic for some riders to sit, it varies on the skill level of the rider. My only real buck came after my horse was lame for three months with no riding, and the first time I sat on him it took him about a half a second to throw me like a sack of potatoes. Luckily, a more experienced rider was available to help, and showed me to turn him in a circle and talk to him until he calmed down, and it worked like magic. He wasn't trying to be mean, he just hadn't been worked in a while. But he only did it twice and then he was fine. Even if a horse has been out of work, they shouldn't constantly be bucking after they've been ridden a couple times. If they're actually trained they should get the hint that they need to go back to their job.

I agree that this horse sounds unbroke. It's up to the owner whether they want to take the time to re-train him, but I think they should at least give him the effort. After all, there had to be something that drew her to him in the first place. If she doesn't want to deal with it, PLEASE TELL HER TO SURRENDER HIM TO A RESCUE. You would be surprised the miracles that horse rescues can do with horses that some people would think are garbage. This horse may not be good for her, but may be good for someone else.

I do NOT agree that all horses at auction aren't good for anything. Almost all of the horses at our rescue have come from auctions: many of them have gone on to be champion show horses competed at tri-state and A-rated shows, perfect trail mounts, and loveable kid's ponies. I think buyers at these auctions should be aware of proper conformation and the fact that green horses may be sedated; i.e. they should be knowledgeable about a good purchase. If you want a good all-around horse for little money, don't go to an auction. Go to a rescue: you'll pay a small amount for a horse that someone has already gotten from auction and worked with, and they'll know if a horse is a good match for your skill level. They will have already put the time and effort into training or re-training the horse before adopting them out. People seem to think that rescue horses are pieces of crap that you can't do anything with; I can tell you from experience that this is not the case.

Edited by: REENY414 at: 2/19/2012 (14:23)
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SHRLZI's Photo SHRLZI Posts: 4,088
2/17/12 7:26 P

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I agree - horse was probably never 'broke'. Good advice, to try to return it -- but do auction places actually do that? If you've become fond of the horse, you probably don't want to risk it getting sold to someone who won't care for it like you do, and you're stuck with months of training... I also agree, **lots** of ground work, walk/jog him on a lead line for miles, maybe ground driving too or even a few months of harness work before you mount again. Is it a colt? the more 'cowboy' training - the more the horse will get the idea that being mounted is a signal for a discussion of who's boss -- you want him to accept people as trustworthy 'bosses' without an argument.

Also, does the weight of the rider have that much to do with being able to sit a buck? I can see a horse would get tired faster with a heavier rider, but wouldn't a lightweight with a good seat be able to stay on just as well? (never had a serious bucker myself, so I have no idea really!)

...there is a place in you where you have never been wounded, where there's still a sureness in you, where there's a seamlessness in you, and where there is a confidence and tranquility in you. ~John O'Donohue
being.publicradio.org/programs/2010/
inner-landscape/transcript.shtml


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GLC2009's Photo GLC2009 Posts: 1,305
2/17/12 4:34 P

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a horse doesn't become unbroke after a month out to pasture. he might be high spirited and need some groundwork for a refresher though.
and as for not being able to ride the new horse cuz she can't sit the bucks--well, a horse should be started with lots of groundwork. once you have lots of groundwork under your belt and you go to ride you should be able to minimize the chances of bucking. of course, it happens, but, people don't train like they used to. training doesn't consist of being able to ride through a bucking session until the horse gets tired and stops bucking. i don't think any good trainer nowadays is training the cowboy way.

Gail -- She believed she could, so she did.


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TXGRANDMA's Photo TXGRANDMA SparkPoints: (316,869)
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2/17/12 4:17 P

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The first mistake she made was going to an auction to buy the horse. You cannot believe anything that is said about a horse there, and are more likely to get something that you can do NOTHING with. They are often scared, wild, or vicious, having some dangerous habit that can get someone killed.
If you go to a breed auction, you are probably better off, but at these little neighborhood, weekly or monthly auctions you are asking for trouble. Better that she sends this horse right back to the auction she got him from, and go and buy a horse from a reputable breeder.

Know God, Know Peace,

No God, No Peace


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CHIBITROWA's Photo CHIBITROWA Posts: 793
2/17/12 4:15 P

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Sounds to me like the new horse wasn't truly broke. I've seen people buy 'docile' horses from auction only to find out later that the horse is wild and unbroke. Typically horses at auctions are sedated via one means or another.

My horse on the other hand was at least green broke, but he threw a temper tantrum once and learned how to rear. He'd only attempt to rear with lighter people after her learned ... course he reared with me and I was around 190 at the time, so those he didn't rear with were rather heavy. He's been in re-training since November 2010. (He's only still in it because they are trying to smooth out his canter, he hasn't reared since March 2011.)

- Don't follow where the path may lead...go where there is no path & leave a trail
- The hardest thing about riding...is the ground
- Dogs have owners... Horses have staff
- Horses are God's apology for men ;)
- Riding is good for the Soul


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SKITTLESFIREHAW's Photo SKITTLESFIREHAW SparkPoints: (0)
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2/17/12 4:02 P

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.I was leasing at a barn were the previous leaser decided to buy a horse from auction and he had to be put out to pasture for a month and when she brought him to ride he was no longer broke.She couldn't ride her new horse for a good 2 months because she couldn't sit his bucks since she only weighed about 110.She had to wait and watch while other people rode her horse.has anyone ever had anything like this happen to them.

Edited by: SKITTLESFIREHAW at: 2/17/2012 (18:20)
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