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KAM51443's Photo KAM51443 SparkPoints: (2,005)
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1/5/13 3:35 P

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thank you so much for the advice!



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SUPERDUPER26's Photo SUPERDUPER26 Posts: 1,553
1/3/13 4:02 P

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I've read that up to 20% of us with T1 also have either a gluten sensitivity, or full-blown celiac disease, and it amazes me that in the course of 20years of medical apointments, no one every bothered to bring this up....

My sister (not diabetic) has "roving allergies", they come and go and there's probably some underlying cause she hasn't found, but when she was in her 'wheat allergy' stage, we both went gluten free (we lived together for a few years in college and it was was easier to cook one meal than two) and my blood sugar was a LOT easier to control for the first few months! Sadly, as we got better at finding substitutes and work-arounds and how to bake again it wore off, BUT, that leads to my more recent conclusion: I don't tolerate processed wheat very well, but organic sprouted stuff is just fine, even when in a commercially prepared loaf of bread. I don't have a good answer for why, and it goes beyond just straight carb counts even when excluding fiber, but I can confidently say that for me personally, I do a lot better- both feeling better and having (at least slightly) easier to control BG- when I limit myself to high-quality wheat products.

Its not a brilliant or even particularly original idea- there are people all over who can 'prove' that processed food is out to kill us, but at least as far as my particular situation is concerned- I can only trace the evils of processed stuff to the grain side of things, and as long as I make a semi-conscious effort to eat only good grains, I'm fine.

Now to actually answer your question though... advice on going GF with T1:
1. Watch out for replacement foods (the GF noodles, breads, bagels, etc), they're carb counts are almost always higher than their traditional coutnerpart, and the serving sizes are usually smaller too.
2. Baking will be tricky, but not impossible. There's no way around it. Never bake with just one kind of substitute flour, always use a mix of them (most GF recipes will already call for such) and while there are 100 different kinds and varieties of flours to use, I could only ever find half of them in my town, and I don't think it made too much difference if I submitted one substitute for another.
3. It goes without saying, but check your BG a bunch. A lot of the GF replacement foods are rice based and likely have a higher glycemic index rating than what your'e used to. Its not the end of the world by any means, but it can mean your BG will go up faster after eating and your I-C ratio might need some watching and adjusting.
4. My vote would be to go back to basic food and do most of your cooking yourself- no packaged meals, sauce-in-a-can, food-in-a-box kind of things. Your entire produce department at your grocery is naturally gluten free, if you buy plain meats from the meat department (cook and season on your own) those are safe, and many milks and cheeses are GF already.
5. And because I'm kind of lazy and want the easy way out... I would just reduce major gluten sources to start with, and not worry about condiments, coatings, gum and cosemtics (seriously, gluten is everywhere!) until you had the bigger parts worked out and/or determined via blood tests that you actually had a gluten issue.
6. If I were de-glutening again, I'd continue to eat what I already had in the house, but when I ran out of something I'd replace it with a "clean" version. Doing a full kitchen conversion all at once is expensive, and the grocery shopping is challenging until you get good at reading labels.
7. A nutritionist might be useful, and it might not hurt to talk it over with your doctor first, but as long as you are confident in your ability to manage your BG on your own I don't think a doctors approval (or notice) is in any way shape or form mandatory.

I think its good to try new things though, and if you're one of the 6% or 20%, you'll be happy you did, and if you're the other ~90%, well, then at least you know!
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KAM51443's Photo KAM51443 SparkPoints: (2,005)
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12/27/12 10:43 P

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i started reading "living gluten free for dummies" by danna korn. it says that about 6 percent of type ones have either c.d. or g.s.
i think i might have gs so any advice about going gluten free with type one would be helpful!
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