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I-CAN-DO-IT-2's Photo I-CAN-DO-IT-2 Posts: 549
9/2/09 11:54 P

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Mikey, gotta go to bed, but...

Yes yes yes (but you will have to learn and be diligent). I vote for what I have...a minmed pump with a continuous glucose monitor. They make 2 sizes. Yours should be hopefully big enough to hold +/- 3 days worth in my opinion. I'm a II, so I only need about 31 units/day. I change my site & reservoir at my convenience (depending on activities and schedule) between 3-5 days. It is wonderful and a blessing.

You will need to diligently count carbs, know your insulin ratios (me, for instance, 1 unit corrections sends my bs down 30. 9g/unit for breakfast, 11/u rest of the day, need to exercise every day or two), I'd recommend a digital food scale, etc.

Also, I am VERY FORTUNATE. I started out 14 years ago in a Joslin based practice...integrated care with a dietician CDE I see every 3-6 months to keep me tweaking and learning. Without that support it would never have worked as well for me. You may need to find a different medical group.

Control has come for me with major testing/experimenting (sometimes 8-9/day). I was taught to count carbs and test before (am I high, low, ok) and 90 minutes later (goal 160) and keep adjusting my carbs/fat and meds until I got it right. I'm a fanatic, so I did it, religiously.

All of you, you can do it too!!

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PS Current A1C is 6.4, has been running 6 with the pump (a little more than a year now). Was consistently 6-7 beforehand. I work at it!

Edited by: I-CAN-DO-IT-2 at: 9/2/2009 (23:56)
Robin

- Fail to plan, and plan to fail!
- "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are. " Theodore Roosevelt
- Progress, not perfection.

Goals Achieved

- 235 2/14/13
- 230


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MANDYB55's Photo MANDYB55 Posts: 408
8/25/09 3:44 P

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Hi Mikey!

I'm glad you found this group. It is very supportive. First of all, congrats on your marriage! That's so wonderful. It's amazing to hear that you have a supportive wife too. Second of all, congrats on taking a step forward with your diabetes.

I am also 24 and out of control. I have gotten better control in the past couple of years, but my numbers are still all over the place. I recently started the pump and things have been better, but I have to work at it daily.

Diabetes isn't easy, so don't feel like you have failed. You are young and your body is still young and you can certainly reverse anything at this point. Since you work long hours I would start by checking your blood sugar every 2 hours or so to see when your spiking or getting low. Also, if you can try and count carbs so you will be able to see if your carb count is correct. Counting carbs is hard to start, but it helps a lot. If you have to eat out a lot due to work, a lot of restaurants have nutrition facts now a days where you can look up the carbs. The best possible thing would be to bring your own food, but I know that can be hard when your always out and about. As far as when you are walking stairs, does that make your BG go low? If so, I would suggest having a 15g snack or something before hand. I know when I do any type of exercise my BG goes low.

My biggest advice would be to take baby steps. Don't try and change all your habits at once because you will want to give up. Maybe start by checking your BG more often and seeing where you stand before and after meals and that will give you an idea if you need more/less insulin for meals. Once you have a good idea of where your BG is on a typical day start or try to count carbs and see if that helps. Also, exercising a half hour a day has helped my BG SO MUCH! I usually just do something for a half hour in the morning and my BG is really great all day. Give it a try!

Good luck. You can do this. And trust me your not in this boat alone. I and a lot of other diabetics are right there with you.

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AMYBEAR5's Photo AMYBEAR5 Posts: 6
8/23/09 8:38 P

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I wasn't clear, but my last post was in reply to MIKEY38654.

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AMYBEAR5's Photo AMYBEAR5 Posts: 6
8/23/09 8:36 P

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Hi there,
I'm 25 and I've had type 1 diabetes for 17 years. I've always been fortunate to have constant appointments, support from my mom, and good doctors to help me w/my diabetes, but during high school and college I spent a lot of time eating ice cream, pizza, and a bunch of other junk that I shouldn't have, and I had some really awful blood sugars. Right after college, I met my now husband, and he encouraged me to start taking better care of myself, which, for me, meant a pump.
Without knowing specifics, I can tell you that the pump has been life-changing for me. It is convenient, easy to use, and it comes off easily for showers, swimming, etc. It takes some work at the beginning, about a month for me, but after that first learning period, it makes life a lot more like a "regular" person's. If you go out to eat, instead of worrying about injections, you can just punch a few buttons right there at the table, and for me, it made my A1Cs come into the normal range, where they have stayed.
A pump does not mean that you can stop being careful with food, but it does mean that you can give insulin doses quickly, and move on with your life.
My doctor put me on one BECAUSE I did not have good control, not AFTER getting it good. She did it to help me, and it worked. It would be great if you could find a supportive doctor who would do the same for you.

Best of luck!

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MIIFIT's Photo MIIFIT Posts: 70
8/16/09 9:47 A

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PS My son's A1C was 7.6 last clinic visit :)

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MIIFIT's Photo MIIFIT Posts: 70
8/16/09 9:45 A

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The way they explained it to us at the clinic is....yes, the pump does make life easier, and yes, it does give better control. But having a pump and using it properly requires discipline and committment, and if you don't have that, the pump is not going to work for you. It's almost like you have to "prove" you are serious about managing the disease first before they will approve you for a pump. Here in Canada, we're funded through the govt for pumps--for sure up to the age of 18, and I think they've extended it to adults as well. 5-6 grand is quite an investment and they want to be sure pump users are going to give a good return on their investment by having those good numbers and being less of a drain on the health care system. My son gets a new pump every three years and we are also funded for 75% of the supplies. The pump can actually be taken away from you if the numbers don't tell a good story.
I guess I have to agree...I do think people need to be on top of things before getting that pump, because if they're not, then the pump isn't going to work for them. The pump isn't "the answer;" it's just a really good tool that you can work with--but you do need to work.

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MIKEY38654 Posts: 12
8/14/09 9:41 P

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TRICKYYY--

Keeping blood sugar under 200 = feat
Not good about checking sugars consistently

Yeah -- that's me. Sometimes I forget to test all day. And my A1C hasn't been 10 or under in years. My current GOAL is 11.

Plus I REALLLLLLLY suck at organization and actually keeping records. I've tried everything in the book and nothing sticks me to keeping up with it. I get days or weeks when I'm super-motivated (I think I'm having one of those weeks now) but it burns out as quickly as it starts. Hopefully I'll stick with it though.

It's my former doctor that wanted good control with injections first, then my wife (which I married 2 months ago) agrees about needing to "know how to do it with injections to be able to use a pump." I keep telling her "no no no no no, you got it all wrong" but she won't agree with me most of the time. The doctor said it was for insurance purposes though - they want it under control. That's stupid to me.

I'm going to try and get back on the pump. I can't see it hurting. It seems as though it would help. And I'll try to keep those records.

Thanks for your reply :)

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TRICKYYY's Photo TRICKYYY Posts: 18
8/14/09 3:45 P

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hey! i'm 26 and have been diabetic for 5.5 years.
there are a few things i want to mention. you have to be ready for the pump. and by the sounds of your incredibly busy and always changing lifestyle, the pump makes most diabetic sense for you. you can have different basal rates and carb ratios for days you're climbing stairs all day or for when you're just standing still. it requires a lot of patience. but whats a week or so of paying extra attention to days on end where your blood sugar stays under 200? (a feat for me! haha)
i am curious how often you check your blood sugar. i'm not judging, sometimes i only do 1 or 2 times a day (!)
anyway, what i really want to say is that i dont understand this whole "you need good control before you go on the pump" well if you have great control, why change what you're doing at all and mess it all up with trying to get used to the pump? i think that some people who don't get the hang of injections find themselves really loving the pump because they have to think about less and can have immediate action with a basal rate, suspend, bolus, whatever. i LOVE that freedom it gives me, i think you'll see a world of difference going back on it again.
as for me, i only used injections for 6 months before they threw me on the pump.

good luck to you, keep checking in here and let us know how you're doing. its never too late to do good for yourself.
my a1c has never been below 9 and i'm aiming for the 8s next time i see the dr!! haha.

:)

Keep on keepin' on!

My Vlog dealing with Type 1 Diabetes and Weight Loss: www.youtube.com/user/Type1DM


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MIKEY38654 Posts: 12
8/14/09 8:41 A

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WOW!!!

This forum is SO encouraging.

MIIFIT-- I got some rather useful information from your post (most of it I've heard already but 2 or 3 things "clicked"). I definitely wasn't as "gung ho" in high school as I am now, and you're probably right - that commitment level wasn't high enough for a pump. But now I believe that has changed. I'll be posting again later with some responses to your questions -- I just got home from work so I'm about to get some rest and will be refreshed later and able to concentrate more clearly.

RLEEGIRL -- Your post definitely pumped up the enthusiasm and raised the bar! I like the "I'm not going down without a fight" -- that's how I am too about most things but time to apply it to Diabetes. I never did the whole live to the fullest and do things while you can - I'm not into (and never have been into) all the stuff most teens and 20-somethings are, I have a logical and moral mindset that guides me away from the side of risks. Your post actually put a smile on my face and a "You can do it!" in my mind.

Thanks for all of your comments, y'all. You don't know HOW much it is helping me to see some more people on my side giving a little nudge in the right direction. I'm stubborn as a mule (if not more) and y'all are making me see the importance of good control. You are motivating me to get off my lazy, well, you know, and get this thing under control.

I'm starting to like this SparkPeople thing!

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RLEEGIRL's Photo RLEEGIRL Posts: 530
8/13/09 8:20 P

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Mikey I am a 25 year diabetic who started where you are now. You are so lucky..LUCKY you have things available that we didnt have 25 years ago.I started out thinking that I would be dead by now Im 50 but Im not I am on the pump,have kidney disease and eye surgeries but Im not going down without a fight.I played my whole adult life ....thinking Im not going to live so I might as well enjoy myself now WRONG...get back on your pump watch your sugars and do take care of your 24 year old self....you have everything going for you.Say that to yourself everyday keep on trucking it does pay off I dont want to go any where for at least another 20 years...at least...keep the faith Rlee

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MIIFIT's Photo MIIFIT Posts: 70
8/13/09 10:54 A

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Mikey...
I don't have diabetes, but my 14 yr old son does, and I am his care-taker. I've learned a few things, but cannot give you the benefit of personal experience.
You have some things going for you here--one of them being, you are ready to make a committment to tackling your high sugars, and two, you have a wife who is gung-ho to support you in your quest.
We have an awesome clinic team here who follow my son diligently. However, the one big thing they have taught us is that it is up to US to tackle this thing. They've given us the tools and the support, but the enormous day-to-day stuff falls to us.
It sounds like you were just not committed to the pump when you were in high school. Pumps give ample warning when reservoirs are going low, so that shouldn't have been a problem. It sounds to me that you just weren't on top of things. Diabetes takes a lot of organization and a lot of fore-thought, as you would know far better than I. Going out, exercise, work, even sleeping--you have to be prepared for diabetes fall-out no matter what you do. You can't just walk out the door like other people, and it sucks, sucks, sucks, but that's the way it is. At 14, my son has accepted this. It sounds to me that you are willing to accept this too at this point in your life.
I don't know where you live, but where we are, they are very careful and specific about who gets a pump. If you are not committed, then they will not approve it. How carefully are you tracking your numbers? You need to test diligently over the next while to see where adjustments in your insulin need to be made. Are you making your own adjustments or are you dependent on the doctor to do this? We track numbers and make our own adjustments as necessary. Are you injecting for carb ratios or what system are you using? Obviously, you need more insulin with your meals and very likely an adjustment to your long-acting insulin as well. If you are eating a lot of carbs, it helps to include protein to slow down the absorption of the sugars into your blood stream so you're not spiking all over the place. Are you injecting before meals (not after) because that is important, too. Be as diligent as possible in understanding carb contents of foods you eat. That has been the biggest challenge for us, Buffets--help!
You will need to test at work and make a note of your activity level. My son required adjustments for heavy activity (ie. less insulin). The pump makes things easier, and getting back on it would be a great goal for you. Write everything down, track what you eat, make a dr's appointment and bring your notes with you--and get on top of this.
The people on this team who actually live personally with this disease will be far more helpful than I...you probably know all this stuff. Reading between the lines of your post, I would guess that committment has been your biggest problem.
Good luck! Let me know if I can help. If you want, you can post what you've eaten and I can help with the carb-counting. In my next life, I want to be a nutritionist.

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MIKEY38654 Posts: 12
8/12/09 4:08 P

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I have some rambling to do and a confession to make. Please be patient with me as I don't usually do things like this but I am fed up with myself and need help.

I am a Type 1, age 24, and have had diabetes for 13 years. I've never, ever been in "good control" of my blood sugars, and for most of my life, I've been completely "out of control" of my blood sugars. No drug/smoking/alcohol history, just out of control with sugars. Since I got married and moved from the parents' house 2 months ago, I've gotten better but my A1C is still skyrocketed and my sugars stay outrageously high.

I'm trying so hard to come into control of these sugars but it always seems so out of reach. I work a 3rd shift schedule and am awake most of the day (about 20 hrs/day) so the whole schedule thing is whacked and I just can't seem to grasp the control thing and lasso my sugars.

I had the pump, once -- that was in high school. Bad timing, because I would not want to leave class to change it and it always ran out of insulin in the middle of assignments. Classes = 30 or 45 minutes, Pump Change = 15 minutes. So I got back off of it because I couldn't upkeep it.

Now I feel that a pump could "save me." I'm motivated: I have a supporting work group, I have a wonderful wife that would love to see me doing better (since better sugars = better longevity), and I have myself seeing that if I don't get this thing under control, I could leave this world (and my wife) really early and neither she nor I can stand the thought of that.

Due to my endo moving back to his home state, I got a new endo within the same clinic (different location) and I've seen her once. She has a deep Russian dialect and is hard for my wife to understand. My former endo would not prescribe a pump until my sugars were under "good control" (something of my dreams) but this new one -- as soon as I said the word "pump" she was 90 to nothing about pumps. I liked that, but my wife believes I need to be able to control it with injections before I get a pump. I say "no way." What are y'alls' takes on that? (And is "y'alls'" a word? Plural possessive of "y'all?")

Well I guess the point of this post is that I don't know what can work for me and I need help gaining control of this thing. I don't have a coherent Diabetes care team - just the endo (considering changing this one), my primary care doctor and nurse practitioners, heart doctor, and gastro doctor. They all can access my records, but they all don't take an active part in my Diabetes care and I don't know how to involve them in it. All they seem to do is send me around in circles and cost me my whole budget. Also, I think one of my biggest stumbling blocks is my schedule. Since I started working at nights (3rd shift), my blood sugars have been worse in the "roller coaster" aspect (50-500 regularly). But I must work nights because I'm in college and about to find a 2nd job, and I like the night schedule minus the diabetes stuff. Another stumbling block is me taking my insulin supplies everywhere I go -- I don't like it and often forget it anyway. I think a pump would help with that.

Does anybody have any suggestions that might help? Especially looking for suggestions for people who have a full (overloaded) schedule including working in an industrial environment at night (10pm-4am). Some days my job requires me to walk up 32 staircases of varying lengths all night long (read: multiple times), picking up excess freight that can't be processed in our system. Other days it only requires me to stand in one place with a bar code scanner. I told my boss to put my "freight running" on a schedule but to this day I am "on demand" and dealing with lows on those nights.

Well now that I've written a book I'll get off here. But I want any ideas on ways to make life with Diabetes, Type 1, easier.

Thank you!

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