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ARCHIMEDESII's Photo ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (202,443)
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6/5/09 2:44 P

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When I was young, we very rarely ate out. the big "treat" was eating a grilled hot dog and krinkle fries at the local Woolworth's lunch dinette.

Woolworth's really did have great grilled hot dogs. Of course, that was in the days when they buttered both sides of the bun before it was grilled.

Back in the day, there just weren't as many fast food places. When I was a kid, we had a long drive to the nearest McDonalds or Dairy Queen.

These days, they're everywhere. Which is the problem. Today, fast food isn't a treat, it's a staple for some families.

How scary is that ?



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6/5/09 3:15 A

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I think our childhoods were quite similar in that way. We virtually never ate out, unless we were on the road traveling. Even then, most of the time we brought food with us. I don't think I had any sort of delivery until I was an adult. I remember one or two times in my entire childhood that my folks got food from McDonald's for dinner.

One of my grandmothers liked to eat out quite a bit, and that was most of my exposure to restaurants.

I was also thinking recently about how we never had soda at home (although some of my friends did). The biggest bottle of soda you could by was a quart, and it lasted several days.
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TWISTOLOMEW Posts: 2,021
6/4/09 12:29 P

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You know, you touch on an interesting point. I think there is a mindset of 'eating out as a reward'.

Interestingly, when I was growing up we very seldomly ate out or had delivery anything. It was in part due to constrained finances and in part due to quality of food. Up until the age of 20, I think I ate pizza, chinese food, and other misc. fast food at most once a year, if that.
So when we did go out, eating fries or something that wasn't in the house was a treat.

As an adult and once I started eating out more often, it took me a long time to disassociate the "treat" of eating whatever on the menu with the concept of eating out.


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6/4/09 8:56 A

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I have really had to change the way I think about food and restaurants in order to get past this. The food they serve is addictive, and the calorie content is unimaginable. The food is illness inducing. I wonder sometimes if our willingness to eat it is indicative of a much larger psychosocial problem than obesity.

For me, the rules have to be straightforward: no take out or delivery, avoid chain restaurants in favor of small, local restaurants, avoid ethnic food (with a few exceptions), and plan ahead. If I can, I need to decide what to order before I get there, not look at the menu, and avoid looking around at what others are eating. Alcohol is out of the question.

Restaurants do what they do with food because it is what we (as a public) ask for. We want them to please our palates and our eyes. We want to feel like we are breaking the rules and like we are celebrating. We convince ourselves we've done something to deserve it. The opposite is true, however! What we deserve is the gift of wellness. Our bodies deserve food that helps them to function.

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DEEANN8's Photo DEEANN8 Posts: 5,144
6/3/09 4:01 P

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Hmm... With meals at 2500 to 2800 cals, I'd only have to eat once every other day ! ;)

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TWISTOLOMEW Posts: 2,021
6/3/09 3:42 P

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It's been done, Kayla. Someone sued mcd's for not telling them eating fast food would make them fat. Don't think it flew, if memory serves me right.

AYLAZON's Photo AYLAZON SparkPoints: (26,501)
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6/3/09 3:36 P

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Crazy, isn't it? When you think about it, it's pretty disgusting and doesn't need to be that way. There are things they could do and still have good food, but, nope. You really have to know what you're doing and do the research before you eat out if you want to have a chance at anything healthy. It's a lot of work. I wonder if someday, someone will try to sue the restaurants for making them overweight. Maybe it's already been done. I guess we choose to go there, huh?

Kayla
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TWISTOLOMEW Posts: 2,021
6/3/09 12:28 P

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Amazing, isnt' it?

I like the last line "They are perfect for sharing and/or taking home for a second meal, which dilutes the effects of the nutritional information."


riiight... because that's what they promote, sharing, not more for you money, big value, etc etc...

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6/3/09 12:09 P

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Not that we didn't know how high in calorie some restaurant meals can be, but these really are over the top. This is an article from the USA Today.


www.usatoday.com/news/health/weightl
os
s/2009-06-02-extremeeating_N.htm



Xtreme Eating Awards go to restaurants' diet saboteurs

By Nanci Hellmich, USA TODAY

Some oversized appetizers, entrees and desserts at chain restaurants are nutritional train wrecks, says the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

On Tuesday, the Washington, D.C.-based consumer group announced its 2009 Xtreme Eating Awards. These are some of the dishes, with nutritional data attached, that the group identified as packed with calories and artery-clogging saturated fat:

Applebee's Quesadilla Burger, a beef patty with cheddar cheese, pepper-Jack cheese, bacon, Mexi-ranch sauce, pico de gallo tucked into two white flour tortillas served with fries. It packs 1,820 calories, 46 grams of saturated fat and 4,410 milligrams of sodium. The chain suggests diners can top the dish with fries with chili and still more cheese.

Chili's Big Mouth Bites, four bacon cheeseburgers with sides of fries, onion strings and jalapeno ranch dipping sauce. The tally: 2,350 calories, 38 grams of saturated fat, 3,940 milligrams of sodium.

Uno Chicago Grill's Mega-Sized Deep Dish Sundae, a monster chocolate chip cookie topped with a large portion of ice cream and covered with whipped cream and chocolate sauce drizzle. It has 2,800 calories and 72 grams of saturated fat.

Olive Garden's Tour of Italy with lasagna, lightly-breaded chicken Parmigiana and creamy chicken alfredo served in one entree for 1,450 calories, 33 grams of saturated fat and 3,830 milligrams of sodium. The tally goes up if diners add breadsticks for 150 calories each and a plate of garden fresh salad with dressing for 350 calories.

The Cheesecake Factory's Chicken and Biscuits, a chicken breast served over mashed potatoes with shortcake biscuits, mushrooms, peas and carrots and covered with country gravy. Total: 2,500 calories. It's almost equal to eating a KFC 8-piece Original Recipe bucket plus five biscuits, which has 2,380 calories and 56 grams of fat.

The Cheesecake Factory Fried Macaroni and Cheese, crispy crumb-coated macaroni and cheese balls with a creamy marinara sauce. It equals 1,570 calories, 69 grams of saturated fat and 1,860 milligrams of sodium. You might be better off eating an entire stick of butter with 57 grams of saturated fat and 800 calories, the group says.

"It's as if restaurants are on a mission to make bad food even worse," says Jayne Hurley, a CSPI nutritionist. Fifteen years ago, restaurants entrees or appetizers might top out at 1,000 calories, and now we are finding in them in the 2,000 calories range."

Mark Mears, senior vice president and chief marketing officer for The Cheesecake Factory, says, "With over 200 items on our menu, we have literally something for everyone. We have items that are very healthy, and we have some items that are more indulgent. The portions at The Cheesecake Factory have always been generous. They are perfect for sharing and/or taking home for a second meal, which dilutes the effects of the nutritional information."


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