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TEAMDIRTDOGS's Photo TEAMDIRTDOGS Posts: 499
1/22/14 3:38 P

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Dogs can be so different and what might work for one might not work for another so....here's my
contribution and I hope it can be helpful.
Geni is the black dog in my profile pic. I got her almost 7 years ago, she was maybe 2 then, and she had some gnarly explosive diarrhea when I got her....giardia. She responded well to tx but continued to have the squirts sporadically. I attributed it to chronic gut issues from being at the pound, residual from the giardia. We fed her the chicken and rice from Costco and she and her sisters did well, good weight, good energy (they're very active dogs who'd frequently run 15-18 miles in the mts with us) but still the occasional squirts. I learned about pumpkin from some message board and that worked well for us.
When we adopted the littlest one, she had some pretty bad systemic yeast so we put her initially on a grain free, then a grain and potato free diet. Pricey, but eventually everyone got put on that same food. It helped clear Little Yeasty's problems, and Geni's stools regulated to the point that I now have half a dozen cans of pureed pumpkin sitting in the pantry.
Once in awhile one of the four will have the runs. Often it's Little Yeasty bc she picks up "trail cookies" with the speed of lightning. I learned of slippery elm bark powder from the raw feeding forums. It's good stuff, and you can buy it online from amazon or from an outfit like Swanson's. It's human grade and acts as a colloid/fiber....relieves constipation and firms up diarrhea. It also supposedly has anti-inflammatory properties that will soothe the gut. In humans I think it's used for gut and for coughs. I buy the powder which keeps well, and make up the "tea" with hot water when needed.

KATHYSCOLLIES's Photo KATHYSCOLLIES Posts: 32,434
1/13/14 11:53 P

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I sure don't have any answers for you Darlene - sorry!!! I would check in with your vet again, and see if they can suggest anything to you .

Hope you can get to the " bottom" (sorry I just couldn't resist that one) of the whole thing!

Kathy
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Canada

A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour.

Don't cry because it is over, smile because it happened!

"Aim small, miss small"
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FANCYQTR's Photo FANCYQTR Posts: 14,986
1/13/14 8:48 P

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Kathy, she started doing it not long after I got her (a few months after, I think). I took her in to the vet then. She was scooting even after and never really slowed down on it until I started giving her the pumpkin. It is not the pie filling that I give her, it is the plain pumpkin puree. I have wormed her twice (and she could be picking up worms when she picks stuff up in the yard, I know) and her anals have been checked again a few months after the first time. Maybe it is mainly habit nowadays. I know that if she has to go potty, she will also scoot. One of her ways of letting me know she really has to go out. Otherwise she will just jump up on me or the chair, but it's hard to tell if that is to go out or just for more loving since she does the same both times.



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KATHYSCOLLIES's Photo KATHYSCOLLIES Posts: 32,434
1/13/14 7:56 P

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There was a huge discussion on here a couple of years ago or thereabouts regarding using pumpkin.

There were a number of team members who strongly advocated the daily use of it as a preventative, as well as those who only used it if the dog was having an issue with its digestive system and / or bowel movements.

My understanding was that you should only give the dogs 100% pure pumpkin, NOT the pie filling pumpkin. We talked to our vets about it at the time, one thought it would be a good supplement to use, the other vet didn't think it was liable to make any real difference, but that ir would not be harmful either.

Both vets however agreed that it was more important to discover what was causing the dog to suddenly start scooting its backside regularly. They also suggested that if ignored, it can become a chronic behavioural issue - a habit.

Darlene, has Cassie always done this since you've had her or is it a new thing for her? Did the vet offer any suggestions when you took Cassie in?

Kathy
Daylight Savings Time Zone
Southwestern Ontario
Canada

A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour.

Don't cry because it is over, smile because it happened!

"Aim small, miss small"
Mel Gibson, in the movie "The Patriot"


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FANCYQTR's Photo FANCYQTR Posts: 14,986
1/13/14 4:01 P

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Birgit, I don't know what the advantages of pumpkin are other it can regulate a dog's system. And I don't know where I first heard of those benefits. It was recommended to me for what Cassie goes through. She hasn't had the problem with her anal glands getting full again, which has been checked, but still does the scooting when she isn't getting the pumpkin, so I continue to give it to her.



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DASARMEHASEN's Photo DASARMEHASEN Posts: 356
1/13/14 2:50 P

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Pumpkin is amazing. I have, in a pinch, used canned pumpkin and had good results, though usually the only canned stuff i can find is pie mix and has other things like sugar, which aren't necessary so i don't like to use it regularly. Other squash, like butternut or acorn, should have the same qualities as pumpkin.

yoghurt is another super food for puppies. while it doesn't have the fiber, it might help digestion in other ways by promoting good bacteria.

HOUNDLOVER1's Photo HOUNDLOVER1 Posts: 8,869
1/13/14 1:30 P

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I'm curious what the reason is for giving pumpkin in the first place? If it is just the fiber then there are other options. Increasing fat in the diet may work just as well and that would be more natural for a dog that is not designed to eat a lot of carbs. Anal gland problems are in part caused by openings that are too small and may or may not be helped by diet changes, depending on the dog.
Birgit

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FANCYQTR's Photo FANCYQTR Posts: 14,986
1/13/14 1:10 P

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I already had her to the vet and had her anals cleaned. Also wormed her. She still continued to scoot. A breeder/trainer told me to add fiber and pumpkin was suggested. She does pretty good as long as the pumpkin is added, but they are always running out of it at the stores so I was wondering what else might help. I'll try asking my vet.



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OLDERDANDRT's Photo OLDERDANDRT SparkPoints: (107,983)
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1/13/14 12:53 P

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I really don't know what could be substituted, but Cassie may need to see the vet? She could have a clogged anal gland??? May need expressed or some such. Vet may also know what could be substituted for the pumpkin if that is what she really needs. Place that call, I advise. If $$ is an issue, they can maybe answer some questions over the phone for free.

Jayne

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FANCYQTR's Photo FANCYQTR Posts: 14,986
1/13/14 12:03 P

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I have been giving Cassie pumpkin with her food just about every morning to help with her butt-scooting problems. That has been helping unless I don't do it for more than a couple days at a time. I know that they are always running out of pumpkin around here and I was wondering if sweet potato or something else would work as well. Have any of you used these things? I'm not too sure what to use other than that.



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