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BRIGHTEYED49's Photo BRIGHTEYED49 Posts: 122
8/10/11 9:41 P

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BURRITAELITA, I love your little post-script with the Dr. Fuhrman quotes!

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BURRITAELITA's Photo BURRITAELITA Posts: 1,469
8/10/11 7:43 P

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TEACHERWANDA-- I liked your term "junk food drug dealers." It is true that just driving by those places makes us consider stopping there. Better to go a different route!

In my case, there is an organic market with vegan homemade soups where I can stop if I'm absolutely starving or want a special treat. At least there's one alternative! I don't go there often, though, because the soups have more salt than I put in my soups, and sometimes they have more fat, too.

The most effective health-care is self-care.

Nutrition is the prescription.

You can literally stretch your lifespan by shrinking your waistline.

Nutrition and other lifestyle factors that you can choose are a more significant determinant of your health than genetics.

Filling your stomach with high-nutrient foods is like by-pass surgery without the surgery.

We are all born with an innate desire to not only survive but thrive.

--Joel Fuhrman
TEACHERWANDA's Photo TEACHERWANDA Posts: 543
8/10/11 6:25 P

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I am making a list of triggers and trying to come up with remediations. For example, I tutor a college student every Sunday afternoon, I used to always stop on the way home for a little treat, so now I find myself wanting something. My fix for this is to run a non-food related errand like a trip to the hardware store to get something for our bathroom remodel; focusing on another task helps.

To keep from visiting a fast food drive through on the way home from work, I have changed my route home to avoid passing by the junk food drug dealers. Also, I eat a piece of fruit, like a banana, before I leave work so I am less hungry.

As long as you are trying your very best, there is no question of failure.
Mahatma Gandhi


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DS9KIE's Photo DS9KIE SparkPoints: (553,403)
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8/10/11 3:54 P

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What I have noticed recently, when I went off this weekend and ate some unhealthy foods, would still eat some salads along with the unhealthy foods, boy I felt soooooo awful, and I just couldn't move.

So when I'm eating fruits and veggies I'm feeling great and hey normal but boy you eat the unhealthy stuff and wow we I feel soooo sick and awful, and icky

So now I'm off to make some sauteed veggies.

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THE SALAD IS THE MAIN DISH


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BURRITAELITA's Photo BURRITAELITA Posts: 1,469
8/10/11 2:31 P

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TERTELLE, BRIGHTEYED and WATERDIAMONDS: What great testimonials to the power of eating vegetables, fruits, legumes, and nuts (and some whole grains)! I found your stories very inspiring and informative. Basically, what I am understanding is that you feel supported by being able to eat as much as you want, encouraged by the improvement in your health (asthma, cold gone more quickly than normal), and delighted by your renewed joy in natural, unprocessed food! And that your cravings for the crap seem to have disappeared because you are feeling satisfied and happy with what you do eat! Very interesting! I'm glad that you have found a way out of addiction to unhealthy food!

Edited by: BURRITAELITA at: 8/10/2011 (14:32)
The most effective health-care is self-care.

Nutrition is the prescription.

You can literally stretch your lifespan by shrinking your waistline.

Nutrition and other lifestyle factors that you can choose are a more significant determinant of your health than genetics.

Filling your stomach with high-nutrient foods is like by-pass surgery without the surgery.

We are all born with an innate desire to not only survive but thrive.

--Joel Fuhrman
BRIGHTEYED49's Photo BRIGHTEYED49 Posts: 122
8/10/11 12:23 P

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What a great thread! This is the question that has been nagging me as well. Yes, there are people who don't eat healthfully and there are people who do eat healthfully. How does one make the transition from unhealthy eating to healthy eating? How *exactly* are people making that happen?

I love what WATERDIAMONDS wrote because it really resonates with my experience so far on Eat To Live. I almost can't explain why it seems to work this way, but it does. I was absolutely addicted to junk foods. What helped jump start me was having my mom visit and doing Eat To Live with her for a weekend. By the time her visit was over, I was set on my way and haven't looked back.

It's almost like the combination of cutting out the addictive junk foods together with ramping up the nutrient-dense foods (veggies, fruits, beans/legumes, nuts/seeds) "treated" my addiction. When I was seeking the solace of food in those early days, I would just tell myself, "All right, eat as much as you want. Just make it vegetables." And let me tell you, I ate a lot of vegetables! I still do.

I also expected some big horrible withdrawal. I did have a constant headache for about 5 days when I started Eat To Live, but it wasn't horrible. It became kind of a background pain and I didn't even associate it with the change in diet until afterwards (my first weekend on Eat To Live, I'd actually had a cold which I thought was causing the headache, but the cold seemed to vanish more quickly than was ever characteristic for me). The weirdest thing about the headache is that I would go to bed with it and when I woke up the next morning, it was still there. That had never happened to me before.

So for me the progression to overcoming my addiction to food went something like this:

Pre-Eat To Live: Long-term struggle with food, weight gain, and addiction. Past attempts to eat healthfully failed. Agreement to do the plan with my mom for two days during her visit.

First 2 Days: Euphoria! I'm making a change that will make me healthy forever!

Next 5 Days: Headache. Cravings. But nothing horrible. Still convinced I can do this.

Next 19 Days (brings me to today): Elated! Dancing around the house. Inexplicably no longer craving junk food. Social situations are the most difficult. Still learning how to cook and bring food with me when I'm out.

So there you have it. I still wonder if I'm going to have some major breakdown at some point. But so far, my cravings have basically subsided.

I look forward to hearing other people's stories on this thread!

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WATERDIAMONDS's Photo WATERDIAMONDS Posts: 14,777
8/10/11 10:07 A

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Since I'm only in the first six-weeks' phase of ETL, my answers may not exactly address the issue you raise, but I'll offer my perspective for what it's worth.

I haven't had one thought about shifting anything yet. My body is so overjoyed to get healthy food that it just doesn't think about the crap I used to eat. It doesn't call my name in the middle of the night, I don't care when I see it in the grocery store, I don't fantasize about it while I eat my vegetables. The interest just isn't there.

I keep expecting this euphoria to end, but it hasn't yet. I even feel a bit uneasy because I expected to go through a major withdrawal.

But right now, I find myself grinning as I eat. I find myself dancing about the house in giddy little jigs because I have just snarfed down something so delicious I can't sit at the table one more second--I gotta move. I find myself exercising with energy and ease and a self-satisfied giggle. I find myself able to handle the stresses that come my way with a patience and a kindness toward others that I can't remember having experienced at any other time in my life.

So I guess my answer to your question at this point in my journey is this: When I eat real food, I don't use food to handle my emotions. When I eat real food, I don't eat more food than I need. When I eat real food, I don't feel the addictions to unhealthy food that used to drive my life.

When I eat real food, I don't shift my addictive relationship with food toward a healthier one--I make a quantum leap.

I may simply belong to the subset of unhealthy eaters who have abused their bodies for so long that good food wipes away the craving for junk like the magic wand Dr. Fuhrman's tells us healthy eating is. Or I may just not have hit the bottom of the barrel yet in terms of detoxing.

Either way, I'll take it.

Margaret--Spring, TX
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TERTELLE's Photo TERTELLE Posts: 206
8/10/11 9:51 A

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I think food addiction is like any other addiction, and while all addicts are "the same", we all have to find our own way back...

For me, since I struggle with addiction to cigarettes (2 yrs quit in Sept) as well as food, I've found distracting myself with "two-handed" activities helped a lot and now I know how to knit and spin-way more productive than eating or smoking!

When I'm in the midst of an emotional eating "episode", it's really tough to stop the eating. The best thing for me is to recognize my own signs and manage it early. Since I've eliminated processed foods, meat, and dairy, though, I've found it much easier to handle-my body just doesn't crave the junk anymore, and my mind doesn't try as much to convince me. It's like once the junk was eliminated from my diet, overeating was eliminated too...


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8/9/11 10:02 P

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I used to buy a box of Little Debbie's and eat the whole box. That was over 12 years ago. The cure, I guess was getting physically ill. Now, I can overdo it when I make homemade sweets. But, that it just because they are so good!

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BURRITAELITA's Photo BURRITAELITA Posts: 1,469
8/9/11 9:52 P

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Lately, I've been interested in reading members' descriptions and definitions of what it's like to be addicted to food, and to gorge when emotionally distraught. Although I eat more than I need, I haven't really gorged as described by the members to relieve emotional stress. However, I'm really interested in hearing how people have overcome this tendency to use food to relieve negative emotions.

Does anyone have any stories about how they were able to shift this addictive relationship toward food with a healthier one? I'd be interested in knowing how they do it, just to be able to talk in a meaningful way with friends who talk to me about this.

Edited by: BURRITAELITA at: 8/9/2011 (21:53)
The most effective health-care is self-care.

Nutrition is the prescription.

You can literally stretch your lifespan by shrinking your waistline.

Nutrition and other lifestyle factors that you can choose are a more significant determinant of your health than genetics.

Filling your stomach with high-nutrient foods is like by-pass surgery without the surgery.

We are all born with an innate desire to not only survive but thrive.

--Joel Fuhrman
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