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1STATEOFDENIAL's Photo 1STATEOFDENIAL Posts: 4,529
8/16/14 12:32 A

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How you take your meds goes along with how you eat food: be careful and smart about it. Don't take your meds after a big meal. Take meds before eating so they're the first thing to leave the stomach. Read labels and make sure you don't take meds at the same time that shouldn't be (like some meds can't be taken with antacids). If you can't get food through your stomach, you probably won't get meds through so talk to your doctor about alternatives. Also always take your meds with at least 1 full cup of water, or more if you can. If you don't drink enough water some meds can get stuck in your esophagus or your stomach. (Ever spit out a capsule for some reason and have it stick to your hand? Same concept.) Also, some meds don't break apart to be absorbed if you don't drink enough water with them.

When your stomach empties, first the pyloris only opens the size of a pinhole to let out the liquids. Then it later opens up wide to let out everything bigger and tells the body that it's not digestible and to pass it through quickly. This is how things like pennies, marbles, etc pass through kids' bodies. So if you don't drink enough water and the stomach doesn't break down the medication enough then it will either sit in the stomach (if the pyloris doesn't open all the way) or will be passed through without being absorbed by the intestines.

If anyone has reason to think their meds are not being used properly in the body, talk to your doctor about alternate medications or to ask about other options. Medications can be toxic (as Renie said) if not taken properly or absorbed by the body properly. Also, if you ever throw up your medications, don't just take another one. It's possible for part of the medication to be broken down and not thrown up, so taking another pill could be too much.

~ Sheri ~

My blog about Ehlers Danlos Syndrome: www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_jo
urnal_individual.asp?blog_id=5444844


Every Day is a Chance to Do a Little Better! Forgive Yesterday, Hope For Tomorrow, Do Better Today!
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RENIESSPARKIN's Photo RENIESSPARKIN Posts: 9,153
8/15/14 4:40 P

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PRESCRIPTIONS AND GASTROPARESIS!

Hi, Team. I'm happy to have found this team. I see there are all sorts of problems caused by our pesky GP. I haven't noticed anyone mentioning being careful with the prescriptions they take. Some of the meds I was taking got backed up and turned TOXIC on me. I literally fell into the ER. They accused me of using street drugs. Finally, they called my Internist who figured out the puzzle and diagnosed Gastroparesis. It still took me over a week to get all the meds flushed through my system. I did a lot of falling during that week (including onto my sister and knocked us both down. What a struggle that was), but did get through it. I still occasionally 'stumble over nothing' and have to be careful.

Just a word of warning for your well-being!

Renie

Irene
Leader~I_Need_Sleep
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was-Leader~RLS/Wilks_Ekbom_Disease but everyone got "Restless" and left! :D


Good food, good sleep, good friends create a Spark for Life!

I've lost 45 lbs since the pix below with daughter & g'sons was taken.

Let's all have fun and encourage others while getting healthy!!


 current weight: 180.4 
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1STATEOFDENIAL's Photo 1STATEOFDENIAL Posts: 4,529
8/10/14 11:57 P

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Michelle - Glad you found our team, but sorry you're having to deal with GP. Know that some people have been able to live healthy, happy, and very productive lives with GP. Anyone at any age can be afflicted from many different types of causes. There are even bodybuilders, triathletes, doctors, and nurses who have GP. It all depends on getting proper treatment and learning to live with your limitations. Every single person with GP has it a little different, and whatever the cause is (many people don't know their cause) can also lend to whether it's easier to live with it or not. (My rare cause makes it so I can only digest while laying down.) So don't think that being diagnosed is the end of your chance at a productive life. As for your boss, talk to your HR dept and address your concerns. Having a hostile work environment adds unneeded stress that will only make your health worse.

If you feel your doctor is unhelpful, find a GI specialist who knows about GP. Call ahead and ask about the doctor's experience with GP. Don't feel bad to fire a doctor who isn't helpful or unwilling to learn and keep looking for one who is. They do exist. I had to fly from MN to PA to find a GI specialist who could finally make my other doctors listen when they're told GP is serious. If you can find others in your area who have GP they may be able to recommend some doctors to see. 1 in 25 people in the US have GP - though in a wide range from barely any affect to having no ability to have any food or liquid - so there are far more people with it than most doctors realize and you are far from alone.

Based on what you said, there's a chance part of your vagus nerve might have been damaged (it controls the autonomic functions in your organs). That can slow or stop the signals to your colon. But even removing that section doesn't mean the rest works 100%. If waste isn't moving through your colon at a normal rate, then it will slow your small intestine, which slows your stomach. Food will back up in your system if you continue to eat normally, and that may be why you vomit every few days - your body is saying there's no more room. By learning what foods your body accepts and changing how you eat (Nola gave some of the list below and I know I've talked about it in many other places on the team) the vomiting and other GP symptoms should lessen. It is a long process to learn the do/don't "rules" for your body, but it is worth it when it helps. As for your low blood sugar, that can happen with GP. If your digestive tract doesn't move as fast as it used to but insulin is still released at a normal rate, then blood sugar drops. In that case, you have to be careful because your blood sugar can go too high sometimes and too low at other times, and both can be dangerous. Eating smaller meals more frequently helps to have a steady amount of food for the body to digest and will help keep blood sugar more stable throughout the day.

Having GP makes life difficult in many ways. But you are still alive and still have the chance to live a relatively healthy life.

~ Sheri ~

My blog about Ehlers Danlos Syndrome: www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_jo
urnal_individual.asp?blog_id=5444844


Every Day is a Chance to Do a Little Better! Forgive Yesterday, Hope For Tomorrow, Do Better Today!
teams.sparkpeople.com/doalittlebette
r

My sparkfriends are my greatest support and I'm grateful for it.
GRNDMOM43's Photo GRNDMOM43 Posts: 47,152
8/10/14 10:53 P

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You need to do what you feel is best. My DR. refused to sign papers too and I did not even know that I had GP at the time. I just had several other things that I now know were probably caused by the GP. The process can be long and hard and GP is not always accepted. If you have other issues that are contributors to not being able to work full time consider those. There are often posts about Disability with GPact. My thoughts and prayers are with you.

Nola

Kansas~ CST
Each step taken is a calorie left behind!

Don't quit! Tomorrow is another day to Sparkle.







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MRSJEFFREYROSS Posts: 3
8/10/14 9:59 P

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Thank you NPA4LOSS for your kindness and advice. It's interesting that 4 months ago my GI put me on a 85% juice diet for the neurogenic bowel. My primary care doctor then freaked that I was going to become diabetic. Interestingly enough I've always had low blood sugar. As far as stress...my job is to respond to complaints filed against a state agency. My boss regularly threatens demotion or termination because I'm not doing enough work. I've been told by Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative services counselor to apply for disability though when I asked my GI about applying he said he wouldn't sign papers because he had patients who got on disability give up.

GRNDMOM43's Photo GRNDMOM43 Posts: 47,152
8/10/14 9:34 P

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You are living. There is information here and on the internet but GP is not a disease that is well understood. I hope that your nutritionist can help you but I had no luck with the ones I saw as they didn't have much if any knowledge on GP. There are sites on Facebook that connect you to support groups and they have been wonderful for me. G-Pact is where you want to start. You will need to find what food you can deal with and we all are different. You will want to eat very small portions and about 6 times a day. You will probably want to eat low fiber, low fat foods. There are some GP sample diets out there. They usually are of three different levels. Level 1 is liquids, Level 2 more solids but more restrictive than Level three. You also might try Nurition 411 as they have a reasonable soft food plan. All foods need to be soft so that they will digest.
Ginger in many forms has helped several people I know. I use sips of Sierra Mist to help me. Crackers are good.
I am on pureed and extremely soft food and liquids. I cannot handle meat and no fresh fruits or vegetables. Many lose weight but about 45% gain weight. Learn as much as you can about the disease on your own. Please feel free to SparkMail me anytime.
I will try to find the names of some of the support groups and get them to you.
Just remember small portions. I am at 4-6 oz at a meal. 6x daily.
It is hard at times but it sounds like you have already dealt with a lot. Stress makes it worse, try to redirect that monster. emoticon

Nola

Kansas~ CST
Each step taken is a calorie left behind!

Don't quit! Tomorrow is another day to Sparkle.







 Pounds lost: 4.0 
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3.75
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MRSJEFFREYROSS Posts: 3
8/10/14 9:08 P

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Hi , my name is Michelle. I'm 40 and became a widow last year. I was diagnosed with Neurogenic Bowel 4 years ago and two years ago I had to have my sigmoid colon removed because my brain stopped talking to it. Surgeon told us that the 7-10 inch section he expected turned out to actually be 15 inches long. A couple of months ago I began vomiting every few days after putting anything in my mouth. GI nonchalantly said I had Gastroparesis, told me to see a nutritionist, and gave me a pamphlet. Now I'm here.

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