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1STATEOFDENIAL's Photo 1STATEOFDENIAL Posts: 4,529
3/31/13 9:08 P

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The first step for you should probably be finding a GI doctor who specializes in GP. You need someone who really knows what they're doing, or they will make it worse (BTDT). You need a GES done to know the severity and for them to consider treatment options, and you need to work with a nutritionist. It is not easy to deal with diabetic gastroparesis, but it can be done. Most importantly, you must be willing to make your health the most important thing. Your diet and exercise plan must be followed because not doing so just makes conditions like diabetes and GP worse. Unfortunately, there currently are no cures or certain treatments for GP. In a few rare cases there are spontaneous cures for idiopathic gastroparesis, but it can never be expected. While this is hard to hear, it's important to realize that we must constantly put in time and effort to be as healthy as we can, and always strive to learn and understand.

As for the gas problem, that is a pretty standard GP symptom. Think about it this way: when food sits out on a counter for a few hours it starts to go bad, aka rot. That rotting is also called fermentation; the rotting food releases gases. It takes as little as 2 hours before those gases start being released. Now put that food into your stomach. A normal digestive system should have less than 10% remaining in the stomach after 4 hours (according to the GES) and it takes 24-48 hours after entering the mouth for the food to pass from the body. So after 2 hours in the body the food starts rotting, releasing gases. If it is digested properly, the rotting may be slowed, but it still happens. At the same time, the bacteria in the intestines that breaks down the nutrients and generates necessary vitamins also 'poop' gases in your body. Every person has a slightly different mix of bacteria in their intestines, and the mix you have will be affected by what you eat and will affect how your body uses the nutrients you feed it. If you have more of some types of bacteria than others, they may release more gases than someone else. If you change what you eat over months and years you can change the makeup of bacteria somewhat. Now think of a person who has GP, where food stays in their stomach for 8 hours or more, it takes 72 hours or more for food to pass out of their body, and has the bacteria in their intestines all screwed up due to eating unhealthy foods then having their digestive system not working properly. This is going to cause more gas to build up in the stomach. So of course we have problems with gas and bloating. Just more reasons for us to be extremely cautious about what and how we eat. When we eat incorrectly (from what our bodies want) it causes difficulties anytime from the first hour until 72+ hour later. Our bodies are essentially screaming at us for eating something it doesn't want or can't handle. That's why we must put in so much time and effort into being as healthy as we can be.

People with idiopathic GP, we go down to a bare minimal clear liquid diet and stay there for a week or more to allow our bodies to 'clean out' all the food that it's been reacting to. After that, we slowly add 1 new food every 2-3 days to learn what our bodies like and what they don't. Adding them more quickly will cause us to confuse what foods are causing the problems with those that are perfectly fine, because it can take 72 hours for food to pass through our bodies. After a few months we will have found a core list of foods that we can handle. Unfortunately, with diabetic GP your body can no longer regulate blood sugars so you can't go down to a very basic diet and slowly build up your list. That makes a nutritionist and having a GI doctor who understands GP that much more important. You must work with them very closely to figure out what foods you can have. At the same time, from what I've seen people with diabetic GP tend to not completely lose all ability to digest food and usually can eat enough food, whereas idiopathic GP patients are more at risk for having a complete system shutdown and must rely on alternate nutrition for survival (still a small percentage of people though).

What I can tell you right now is that every single thing you eat should be in moderation. Eat low fat, low fiber, and low simple carb. Work on eating 6 mini-meals each day. Avoid eating/drinking anything frozen or cold. Do not drink liquids while you eat. Move gently after eating to help with digestion, like take a slow walk, and stay upright for a few hours after eating so gravity can help. Do not exercise heavily on a full stomach, but get in some moderate exercise whenever possible. This is what any GI doctor who knows what GP is will tell you.

~ Sheri ~

My blog about Ehlers Danlos Syndrome: www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_jo
urnal_individual.asp?blog_id=5444844


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IKACEY's Photo IKACEY Posts: 2,599
3/31/13 2:10 A

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Sheri thanks for all the info. I have not taken good care of my nutrition for some time and even my sugar levels have been high since the november before last when I had a gash open on my amputated stump and then infect badly. My endocrinologist had tried all kinds of adjustments as it was controlled before by nothing was working. About 6-8 months ago I started having constant stomach pain and real trouble with my acid levels, which my GI dr determined by endoscopy. As well as there was " a lot" (not sure what that meant) of food in my stomach. They put me on 40mg of Prilosec 20mg morning and night and the Gastro surgeon doubled that before my first stomach surgery. He did mention again that the food was there and the acid still kind of high after the first operation, but wrote it off to the effects of the pre cancer in my stomach. I really have not had too much trouble with my GP before that except the gas problem. In Feb I started on here tracking my nutritions elements like Sodium Cholesterol Saturated Fat and Fiber and Carbs and was in shock when I saw what I was eating. The right kinds of foods but processed and too high fiber and the full fat versions etc. Only thing I was watching was my sugar intake really. And I have become almost completely deconditioned mobility wise as I was stuck in a darned wheel chair, but that is another story for another team. I started simple bed and chair exercises was able to begin walking and so on and my levels of everything have dropped including my sugar levels. But now I am having more trouble with GP. My stomach was normal acid levels and only a small amount of food this last procedure but I know it takes longer for nutrition results like BS level to show, maybe a day. 6 meals were tried but my blood sugar levels stayed too high. And it seems veggies have become a problem. So I need to check out the GP diet and see how my Diabetic nutritionist thinks it will work out with my D2
The emptying test sounds like something to bring up along with other stuff happening since the operative procedures. And I do already watch all my meats. I don't eat much red meat or pork if at all, just boneless skinless chicken breast, grnd turkey breast and fish. I know its been two months since I had beef, and about 10 years since I ate any sausage.
This is a lot to take in but very helpful and has given me some hints what to do. I think I'll wait on those beans for now though. The bananas and veggies are giving me enough hell right now. And I used to eat baby carrots tomatoes and lettuce everyday for a long time with no probs. Now my regular Md says they maybe causing the gas and avoid them. This is not easy to adjust to. One side says eat more fiber and veggies and fruits, avoid simple carbs, but the other side says avoid fiber and veggies and fruits and try to go easy on complex carbs like whole grains Sheeesh! a body hardly knows what to eat anymore.
Well going to read what foods to eat next . Kacey

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it"

"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." Eleanor Roosevelt

"Taking ACTION is the ultimate power of Motivation. Nothing beats it, period."
Edgar Ng

"Some people quit due to slow progress, never grasping the fact that.......slow progress.....is progress."




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1STATEOFDENIAL's Photo 1STATEOFDENIAL Posts: 4,529
3/30/13 3:09 A

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Welcome to the team Kacey. (I'm sorry it's taken me a few days to welcome you; normally I try to do so very quickly.)

The most common form of GP is diabetic gastroparesis. Just this form affects 20 million people in the world. It is caused much in the same way as neuropathy in the hands and feet. When blood sugar is uncontrolled it causes damage throughout the body, especially in areas where nerves and blood vessels are the tiniest - the hands and feet. For you, add in the complication of surgery to remove the pre-cancerous cells and there is not only damage to the nerves and blood vessels but to the muscle too. Still, it's important to remind yourself that you can manage GP by managing your other conditions. You're still able to eat which is a good thing; managing your conditions may help keep your GP from worsening and that's very important. The gas you're having is common for patients for GP. We frequently have lots of gas (burping and flatulence) and it does get worse if you're eating foods your body doesn't want.

I'm curious about how you're saying with tests and procedures they found high amounts of acid and undigested food. If you have not been through a gastric emptying study (GES), go see a GI doctor ASAP and get that done. That is how GP is diagnosed and having the information from that test is important to help ensure you're getting the proper treatment(s). Having high amounts of acid doesn't necessarily indicate GP. We have GERD because when food can't go down it tends to go up instead (hence the vomiting many patients have). The undigested food being seen during a procedure is important if it's been more than 5 hours since you've eaten when they've done an endoscopy, yet it can't be used for diagnosis. With a GES the food you're given is regulated to ensure the test results are accurate. If your results show just a slightly slow emptying rate that's far easier to handle than someone who takes 2-3x longer than normal to empty. It's also important to note that the more high fat/high fiber foods you eat over days and weeks the slower your stomach will empty versus eating easy-to-digest foods which will allow your stomach to empty faster. There are cumulative effects.

When it comes to foods, the best thing you can do is work with a nutritionist and go through the process of finding what foods your body will accept. This is a long process where you start with a few simple foods and slowly try new foods - 1 every 2-3 days - to see how they affect you. Every single case of GP is different because every person's body is different. We can help give you ideas for what foods to try, but we can't tell you what will and will not work for certain. I can tell you that cooking or pureeing fruit and veggies breaks the cell walls which makes it easier to digest, avoiding fibrous fruit (like oranges), veggies (like celery), meat (like steak), etc will help a great deal, and some foods will always be difficult to digest, such as anything high in fat. Avoid all beans to start and if you want to try them as you figure out your diet you can, but most beans are very high in fiber and they won't break down well no matter what you do. Also, you know the saying "beans, beans, the magical fruit" - do you really want to add to your gas pain problems? There are some people who can handle some types of beans, but it's up to you to go through the process and find out if your body will handle them or hate them. For meat, as I said avoid fibrous meats; then be sure to skip the skin, stick with lean cuts, and cut off all visible fat. Do not fry it, be sure it's cooked thoroughly, and try new ways of cooking it like broiling.

A few more tips you should implement are: do not drink liquids while eating (a few sips to aid swallowing is okay), avoid cold foods and liquids or at minimum keep them at the end of a meal or end of the day, eat smaller meals more frequently (also helpful for the diabetes) - 6 mini-meals is recommended, and learn to pay close attention to your body because it will tell you what it likes and what it hates.

I hope this information helps you. It is a lot to take in, but it is important to know what you're dealing with. Feel free to ask any questions you have and we'll do our best to help you out or at least point you in the right direction for an answer. Through supporting each other we all learn.

~ Sheri ~

My blog about Ehlers Danlos Syndrome: www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_jo
urnal_individual.asp?blog_id=5444844


Every Day is a Chance to Do a Little Better! Forgive Yesterday, Hope For Tomorrow, Do Better Today!
teams.sparkpeople.com/doalittlebette
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My sparkfriends are my greatest support and I'm grateful for it.
IKACEY's Photo IKACEY Posts: 2,599
3/29/13 2:32 P

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Thanks all I feel very welcome
Shari good to see you here too
Nola I believe I will go there and see whats happening

Easter Blessings and Happy Passover to all emoticon Kacey

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it"

"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." Eleanor Roosevelt

"Taking ACTION is the ultimate power of Motivation. Nothing beats it, period."
Edgar Ng

"Some people quit due to slow progress, never grasping the fact that.......slow progress.....is progress."




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3/29/13 9:27 A

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I'm glad you found us, Welcome to the team!


My name is Shari; I have been a Sparker since July 2006, I am now in hospice care for metastatic breast cancer, but I'm not letting cancer stop me from Sparking!

Promise me you'll always remember: You're braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.

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GRNDMOM43's Photo GRNDMOM43 Posts: 47,152
3/29/13 4:34 A

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emoticon emoticon emoticon Welcome to the team. The ladies here are helping me though the process of learning to deal with my GP. Please join our chat thread as we talk about many of the obstacles. I do not have diabetes but am having problems regulating my blood sugars so I am having to learn so many new things. It is nice to have you with us. emoticon

Nola

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IKACEY's Photo IKACEY Posts: 2,599
3/27/13 9:07 P

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Hi I'm new to this team but not to Spark. I have type2 Diabetes and GP which the Dr says came from having the D2. I seem to tolerated many foods but the GP has seemed to amp up since 5 months ago when my Gastroenterologist discovered I had Pre cancerous cells in my stomach. Now I have gastro distress and gas all the time and I can't tell what its from GP or otherwise. My regular MD says its the fiber and raw and high fiber veggies I am trying to eat now for healthier nutrition plus the stress from the way the cells affected my digestive tract and the two operative procedures I've had to remove the cells and cauterize the entire area around where they were. The information I'm reading here seems to be very informative and supportive, plus I know at least two people on the team and so decided to see if joining would help me tweak things around where I can still eat fairly healthy without killing myself with gastric pain. I know I digest slowly because with both tests and procedures they found a high amount of acid in my system (probably from Gerd which I also have big time) and undigested food in some quantity.

With the D2 I have to intake a certain amount of nutritional things like so many calories and carbs which my stomach simply will not take in, while avoiding others that I should have because of GP. I do okay with liquid diet breakfasts like Sweet Success, but Glucerna is good for diabetics and two thick and distressing for me. Also my diabetic dr does not like me on liquid breakfasts as they do not stay in the stomach long enough and my sugar drops. Did I read rightly that cooked vegetables have less fiber than the raw ones? or is that only when peeled cooked and mashed or pureed? Also if I mash beans are they a good substitute for meat which seems to distress me, though I usually only eat boneless skinless chicken breasts or canned chicken breast, fish, and ground turkey.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks and hello everyone Kacey

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it"

"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." Eleanor Roosevelt

"Taking ACTION is the ultimate power of Motivation. Nothing beats it, period."
Edgar Ng

"Some people quit due to slow progress, never grasping the fact that.......slow progress.....is progress."




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