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JOYISDESTINY's Photo JOYISDESTINY SparkPoints: (1,850)
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2/2/14 10:28 P

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Thanks for the welcome everyone. I do agree with what many say here in that we must be our own voice and advocate for what we need. I recently was in the ICU for about 5 days, but was conscious so the staff allowed me to take care of my own diabetes management. The nurses knew a bit more than the ones on the regular floor, but they told me that I was better than they could ever be, because they do not get pump training in the hospital. My worst experience was a doctor that cancelled my surgery while I was on the way for surgery because of an "elevated A1C." Are you kidding me? Doctors need more than basic training in the area of diabetes--especially DT1. It does make weight management a bit trickier for me because I am on steroids right now to calm a very severe flair and boy I have had to test alot more and fine tune my temp basils and boluses for the past weekend. I see my doctor Monday and hopefully a new medication can take its place. I think we are much better than doctors because diabetes is one area (especially T1) where we come the closest to self treatment. My endo just looks over my basics patterns, does blood work. He says I know more about diabetes and body physiology than most doctors ever get in class. I guess because my life depends on it, I do--and the wake up call behind the wheel of a car in 1996 helped motivate me as well. Again, thanks for the welcome. emoticon emoticon

We do not know how strong we can be until being strong is the only choice we have!


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RAMCPAM's Photo RAMCPAM Posts: 9
1/30/14 1:44 P

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I agree with the comments posted so far. We must be our own voice - loud and clear when it comes to being in the hospital with type 1 diabetes. One time I had shoulder surgery and was hospitalized for 3 days. My sugars were all over the place because they wouldn't let me manage it myself. I finally called in my diabetes dr and then was released to go home.

Several years ago I had a heart attack and was hospitalized. I was surprised how little the nursing staff knew about type 1. They were use to handling type 2 but seemed mystified when I was explaining how I handled my diabetes. They were happy to let me monitor and give my own insulin as long as I reported to them.

I have been a type 1 diabetic for 51 years and I'm sure I know my condition better then anyone else. Welcome to SP. I'm sure it will be an encouragement to you.

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VALERIE1619's Photo VALERIE1619 Posts: 1,090
1/30/14 12:24 P

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No one has the right to take away your pump!

I had a major spinal reconstruction surgery last year and wore my pump through the entire 10-hour surgery, plus handled all my diabetes care for the five days I was hospitalize. I insisted that my husband be able to stay in my room with me so he could take over my care while I was coming out of anesthesia, which he did.

You're right; we need to be our own advocates for the care we need. But remember, you know your care and routine better than anyone else, so before willingly relinquishing any part of that care, kick, scream, and become the squeaky wheel!

I was in the ER once with DKA and the staff and doctors agreed that I knew what to do regarding my care, so they left me to it, while they addressed the emergency aspects of my situation.

Valerie



Valerie

Sh*t is hard. Do it anyway.



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RLEEGIRL's Photo RLEEGIRL Posts: 530
1/30/14 12:15 P

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believe it or not alot of the medical field knows little to nothing about diabetes management.we have to be our own advocates and speak up for ourselves.last april i too was admitted to the icu here they took my pump,hooked me up to an iv with no insulin because the doctor hadnt yet ordered it i said im a type1on a pump who needs insulin they put the call in while waiting sugar shot up to325no surprise i called my hubs and had him bring me shot that i gave myself the nurse was pissed but my endo said i did the right thing

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PFERG66's Photo PFERG66 Posts: 2,300
1/30/14 11:10 A

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I believe this community will be my lifesaver as a T1D. Every day I get inspiration and/or motivation to keep going.

I rolled my suv reaching for an orange because I was going low. That was more than 10 years ago. I went dangerously high (malfunctioning infusion set) and ended up in a hospital whose "protocols" did not come close to matching my treatment plan. Miraculously a friend who was the diabetes intake worker at that hospital saved my life. She read the riot act to the attending physician; I was able to reconnect my pump and deliver insulin in the way I needed. I was back home after 36 hours of hell.
Now I carry a "$25,000. Emergency Kit"--- the dollar amount of my hospital bill---which has syringes, extra sets of everything, insulin, snacks, etc.

Long story short, it's hard work to be a managing, functioning T1D. Good for us and yay for SP!



Everyone has naturally the power of excelling in some one thing.

~Proverb



"With ordinary talent and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable.
--Thomas Foxwell Buxton


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RLEEGIRL's Photo RLEEGIRL Posts: 530
1/30/14 7:58 A

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I don't have to tell you to test test test before you get behind the wheel of your car before every meal before and after everything testing will help with everything it brought me from 7.2 to a 6.9 and helped with my severe low bloods ...... Still get them but are much more aware of them and can catch the highs and lows before they get too far ( most of the time ) welcome and be well

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JOYISDESTINY's Photo JOYISDESTINY SparkPoints: (1,850)
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1/30/14 12:23 A

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Hi there. I was 23 years old when I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. I went inpatient at St. Mary's Hospital in Rochester, MN and learned the multiple injection system and I used that for years until 1995 when I went unconscious with hypo unawareness behind the wheel...thankfully no one was hurt. I agreed to go on the pump and been on it ever since then. For the last 7 years, my control has been rotten, but especially the last 4 years when I was hit with RA as well. I had a wake up call recently when I had complications as a result of a routine surgery. I found SP and so glad I did! My blood sugar control has gotten a lot better since I have kept my meal plan with no cheats for about 1.5 weeks. emoticon --DJ

We do not know how strong we can be until being strong is the only choice we have!


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