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7/13/12 7:14 P

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What an inspiring conversation! Thanks ladies!

Keep Sparking!

Sheryl_B
Team Leader - Girl Scouting! www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
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Team Leader: Sparks in the Coulee Region (Lacrosse / Onalaska and surrounding area)
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7/12/12 4:14 P

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Outstanding! Go, girl! Thinking of her bridging to adults must be a bit unnerving for you, though. Two of my granddaughters are in college, and I wrote to them as one adult to another on email that also went to other adult family members. My son was really upset. It is clear that he doesn't think of his oldest daughter as an adult yet. He still wants to have a lot of say in her life. I advocated trying some studies of things that are a bit contrary to what he has taught and he said I was telling her to turn against her parents. It didn't hurt my feelings. I remember how hard it was to let go of my first to marry, and how I protested internally when my "babies" were sent to war. After that I had told my 14-yr-old he should pick his own subjects at school. I got a call from the guidance councelor saying I was neglecting my child by not helping him choose. I told her I had confidence he would choose well. She said he's only 14, not an adult in college. I said yes, he's 14, and in as few as 24 months he'll be legally able to marry or die for his country. If he doesn't already know how, he'd better start learning to make his own decisions. She was silent for a moment, then said in a kind of quiet horror that she guessed I was right. She was probably looking out of her office at the hoards of silly and ignorant kids and imagining them as soldiers or parents. emoticon Your daughter at least has the advantage of having made many decisions and learning how to talk to adults with confidence.

Edited by: LJ32920 at: 7/12/2012 (16:20)
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CARROLLKR's Photo CARROLLKR SparkPoints: (87,708)
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7/12/12 8:38 A

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I know that GS has been very good for her. She has learned good leadership traits. I will be a proud mamma next year when she bridges to adult as a 13 year girl scout. She has earned her bronze and Silver award. So gotta push for the Gold. Pre reqs are done, just the project left.

If you got a traffic ticket would you break every traffic law the rest of the day? Then why toss the whole day over a slice of pizza? ~Indygirl

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7/11/12 7:50 P

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Hi Carrollkr~Yes, it is hard for even younger girls to fit everything in. We count everything, though. If she has a science fair project and does it on watersheds, we get permission to display it at the library with only a couple changes to the wording, and it becomes a scout project to inform people about our water sources. If she has to write a paper for school, she writes it in a way she can also use it for a scout badge. She recently earned most of a sign language badge because in choir she had to learn to sign all the way through a song. Also, we don't do things more than once. For example, there were some six badges that all had making a first aid kit as a requirement. We did not make six first aid kits. After the first one, she made a game for remembering what the items in the kit were for. Another time she found out what could be substituted for items in the kit that were used up. Things like that. Church activities give opportunities for service and "sharing with others" what she has learned. But, as you probably guessed already, she would not do all this coordination on her own. They really need an assist to find ways to use what they are already doing to count as scoutly activities. And to care if they do anything for scouts.

I was always bugging/pushing/encouraging my children to be active in scouting. I kept scrapbook-journals-photo records for them, and it was my effort, not theirs. But they aren't short adults. Looking into the future to see what will be meaningful to them when they look back is not a skill they magically acquire. They need somebody to work with them and look out for them. Men are the same way. Men would much prefer to elope and skip the traditional wedding cost and bother. It isn't until they are past middle age and acquiring wisdom that they look at that wedding picture and appreciate being bonded to siblings and ancestors by that tradition.

It's usually women who keep holiday traditions and make birthday parties happen. Keeping children at piano lessons despite protests until they can play well enough to decide whether they want to continue-- or dance or gymnastics or anything they see as worthy until it becomes work-- is usually the mom's job. And fitting in a lifelong association with Girl Scouting is worthy. For the rest of her life, she will always have pride in accomplishments and sisters in the organization, if she wants to. But they need an adult to help them hang in there to reap the rewards and have the opportunities it can bring.

Either I feel very strongly that the benefits of girl scouting are enormous, or I really need to share scouting with the grandchildren in order to have a purpose in my life. But I hope it's both. emoticon

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7/11/12 4:46 P

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Good for your grandaughter! Go girl go!
I've been a leader for 10 years, but we don't do anything lately. My daughter will be a senior next year and GS is way down on her list of things to do. So I'm not real familiar with the new program. She did one of the Journeys a year ago. They have their ups and downs. I like that you can do as much or as little as you want to. You can do a lot more of what you want to rather, than here are the requirements. It leaves it up to your imagination to earn it.

If you got a traffic ticket would you break every traffic law the rest of the day? Then why toss the whole day over a slice of pizza? ~Indygirl

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7/11/12 1:27 A

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I'm a green grandma. Our family has a long history of scouting, going back to my mom who started in the 1920s. I've been a leader most of my adult life. Right now I'm not, but I keep busy helping my granddaughters. One especially seems to want to do everything out there. Since the end of last month was the deadline for finishing up all retiring badges, we've been extremely busy. Not only that, she's bridging to Juniors, so she also wanted to earn all the new badges for Brownies before she bridges. She's had me and her sister and often her mother running all over the place taking her to sports, classes, camp, clinics, and community agencies. It's been quite a busy few months. It makes the limited number of badges in the new system quite a relief to this fat old granny! How is everyone else dealing with the changes for the new program? Like it? Not?

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