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MOTIVATED@LAST's Photo MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 15,467
3/29/18 9:58 P

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There is some evidence that plyometric type exercises are highly effective - partly because they load up the muscles and tendons to 6-10 times your bodyweight for a short fraction of a second. However, these types of extreme, short duration loads are bad news if you have a pre-existing injury or weakness, as they are the very kind of thing that can cause injury. When you are talking about large powerful muscles like the quads, they can potentially load up smaller muscles and tendons elsewhere in the muscle chain to more than they can handle. These short duration loads are much higher than you would experience in a heavy lower body lift.

With your foot issues, I'd strongly recommend avoiding plyometric exercises for now. Instead go for some slower moves that provide a steady resistance - just like the slow pushups you talk about elsewhere.

I'd also recommend including barefoot calf raises in your program. Barefoot raises in particular really work the small muscles in the foot and ankle to keep you balanced, especially as you work up to the more challenging single leg variant. These are not so much about muscle mass gains, as about functional strength, and ensuring a strong and stable platform the rest of your body can work from. (Kind of like you might work on grip strength with the upper body - it doesn't really help you lift, but it does ensure you don't drop the bar).

You could always circle back to plyometrics in 2-3 months time when you have built some strength throughout the lower body chain.

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.


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FABIOPWL37's Photo FABIOPWL37 SparkPoints: (31)
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3/29/18 11:34 A

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Haha, well you're not wrong.

"Accomplish as much as you can by doing as little as possible. Be lazy, yet efficient."
SIDSTAR1991 Posts: 25
3/29/18 11:21 A

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Hahha i feel dumbells are safer as i can drop it down once i fail lol

FABIOPWL37's Photo FABIOPWL37 SparkPoints: (31)
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3/29/18 10:53 A

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Definitely. I dumb bell bench pressed for a long time, and it promotes an even workout between your left and right side since they're separate. I still only use dumbbells on full incline bench press.

Lifting heavy with dumbbells requires the same precautions though. When I do it, there are times of overconfidence on a rep when my stronger side makes it all the way up but the weak one doesn't and comes crashing down. I've notice that dumbbells put more pressure on my deltoids/armpit area too. It's just as important not to overdo it with dumbbells as it is the bar.

If this helps, I swapped to benching with the bar more once I was dumbbell bench pressing with 60lb dumbbells.

"Accomplish as much as you can by doing as little as possible. Be lazy, yet efficient."
SIDSTAR1991 Posts: 25
3/29/18 10:42 A

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Since am sort of a beginner (not strong) i can use dumbells right? I mean the gyms dumbells go all the way up to 130lb so i have time before it maxes out

SIDSTAR1991 Posts: 25
3/29/18 10:41 A

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Thanks alot

FABIOPWL37's Photo FABIOPWL37 SparkPoints: (31)
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3/29/18 10:36 A

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@SIDSTAR1991 Yes, I have some buddies that join me for chest day.

You should never do a weight you aren't 100% comfortable with on the bench without a spotter. However, I have a home gym and understand that one isn't always around which builds anxiety towards heavy lifting. Here are some tips:

1) USE/BUY A POWER RACK. Power racks or half racks have adjustable bars on the side that can be lowered to catch/rest the bar on if you cannot put up the weight. Simply put a separate bench in the power rack and raise the side bars to just above your chest. Lay down on the bench and rest just the bar on the sidebars to make sure it cannot touch your head/chest.

2) Figure out your current comfortable repping weight. If you are benching alone and trying to increase how much you can bench, do not try to go up a ton of weight per week. I tend to increase slowly, adding 5lbs to each side every 2 weeks.

3) Do not fight for the last rep without a spotter. There have been times where I do a rep on bench perfectly fine, and totally lose it on the next one without warning. If you feel like you won't be able to do the next rep, put the bar back and lower the weight.

* What I do is if I'm not happy with how many reps I can put out, then after my last one I immediately get off the bench and do "slow-speed" push ups until it feels equivalent to what the next rep on bench would've been.
(They're normal push-ups, but go down and up slowly. Kind of like a reverse bench press with your body.)

4) Take breaks. Heavy lifting requires your muscles to be stable and ready. You need to drink water, and allow time for your nervous system to reset. I'm not saying to sit there for 10 minutes after each set. But if it's getting tough, a 3-5 min rest/stretching period may be necessary.

Remember if you can't put it up, the only place the bar is going is down. So take precautions, and do as many as you can with good form. If your back start to arch or arms start to go limp, you are done with that set. Power-lifting isn't Crossfit. Form is key, and bad form can lead to serious injury.

Good luck and hope this helps :)

"Accomplish as much as you can by doing as little as possible. Be lazy, yet efficient."
SIDSTAR1991 Posts: 25
3/29/18 9:50 A

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Sorry for hijacking your thread but do you use a spot for bench pressing? Or you workout alone? I just started lifting on my own and i have heavy lifting fear.

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3/29/18 9:37 A

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Thanks for the advice/congratulations!

I am glad hear that my body-type may not be the culprit here.

For the leg day issue... I guess technically my cardio day is my leg day. I didn't specify, but my cardio day consists of high resistance runs on the elliptical and a combination of plyometric lower body exercises such as jumpsquats, calf raise squats, jump lunges, etc. The cardio-leg day was kind of a result of my experience with P90X. I had surgery in both of my feet so super high weight barring leg exercises scare me a bit. My feet aren't as strong as they should be and also make me imbalanced.

You do raise a good point about the arm/shoulder issue. However, my only fear with combining muscle groups is that I will not be able to improve how much I can lift.

My all-time goal is to gain muscle size. Body-building over power-lifting in a way. The current idea I base my routine off of is that power-lifting with 5 sets of 5 on isolated muscle groups will improve how much I can lift. Once I get to the point where I am lifting big numbers, I will slightly drop the weight and up the reps to return back to a hypertrophic routine. This time using much higher weight then before. Resulting in massive muscle growth. I just have to get over this wall I hit with the weight.

I could be totally wrong though :) regardless I will definitely test out the split routine you suggested for a week to test the waters. If I notice strength increase I will stick with it. Also, I will start using the drop-set idea within the split routine that @SP_COACH_DEAN mentioned to try and break this plateau I've run into.

Edited by: FABIOPWL37 at: 3/29/2018 (09:44)
"Accomplish as much as you can by doing as little as possible. Be lazy, yet efficient."
MOTIVATED@LAST's Photo MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 15,467
3/28/18 7:46 P

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Firstly, congrats on the weight loss to date.

While body type may influence the muscle mass gains you could expect, I'm not sure it really changes how you should approach workout design.

But speaking of workout design, I do have some comments about the weekly program in your post.

1. It appears you work each muscle group only once each week, and are not working the legs at all. You will get better results from working each muscle group at least twice a week. Also, the leg muscles (especially the quads and glutes) are the largest and strongest in the body, and if you are lifting to prevent weight gain, I don't know why you are neglecting the very muscle group that will give you the most bang for your ST buck.

2. Most exercises work not just the muscles being targetted, but a range of smaller muscles (often in surprising places) to keep you balanced and stabilized. Most arm exercises will also work the shoulders, and you are probably not getting sufficient recovery time for these muscles on Wed-Thur. The more classic grouping of muscles is upper body, lower body and core.

My suggested workout design would be:
M - Cardio
Wed - Full body strength
Th - Cardio
Fr/Sat - Full body strength.

If you are committed to a split routine, then
M UB + Core
W LB + Core
Th Cardio
Fr/S - UB + LB
would give work each muscle group twice while still giving sufficient recovery between ST sessions.

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.


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SP_COACH_DEAN's Photo SP_COACH_DEAN SparkPoints: (117,792)
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3/28/18 1:06 P

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Hello,

Many people aren't "pure" types--they have a mix of characteristics for two (or even all three) types. Here's a link to a website with more info on this and a tool for figuring out your type:

https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/becker3.htm

If you're "stuck" in terms of increasing your workout performance, you might want to try a different method for a little while. For example, instead of 5 sets of 5 reps with the same weight, you could try doing "drop sets" where you do as many reps with the heavy weight as you can, and then rapidly decrease the weight and try to do as many more repetitions with the lower weight as you can without much rest. (This is safest and probably more effective when you use a weight machine and can adjust the weight very quickly, so you don't spend too much time making the change, but it can be done with free weights as well). Here's a link to more info on this:

https://www.muscleandfitness.com/workouts/workout-routines/gain-greater-mass-drop-sets

Hope this helps.

"All your life, you have just been waiting for this moment to arise."
(Lennon & McCartney, "Blackbird")






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FABIOPWL37's Photo FABIOPWL37 SparkPoints: (31)
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3/28/18 10:44 A

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I have a question regarding my body type. I'm having trouble figuring out if I am ENDO or MESO. I need to know in order to better pinpoint my weaknesses in workouts. Here's my dilemma:

-I am a 21 year old 6'1" male and lost 70lbs in 9 months last year. I now weigh 195lbs.

My weekly routine consists of:
Mon- chest + back
Wed- arms + abbs
Thur - shoulders
Fri or Sat- cardio + Abbs.

I eat about 2500-3000 calories a day on average.

That being said, my ability to lose weight so rapidly makes me think I am possibly mesomorphic. However, I was overweight for the majority of my life, and have a very large bone structure... wide shoulders, middle finger and thumb barley touch when wrapped around wrist, wide hips (mens 36 waist). Dedicated to my fitness is required or else the weight will come back even easier then it left. Which makes me think I'm possibly endomorphic.

Basically I have hit a wall in advancing to higher weights and I think it's because I may be training wrong for my body type.

Walls I've hit:
Benchpress: rep 175lb, max 205lb
Dealift: rep 245, max 305
DB bicep curl: rep 45lb
DB shoulder press: rep 50lb
There are others but those are the toughest ones.

I do 5 sets of 5 for most of the heavy lifting, and stick to hypertophic exercise for abbs and shoulders to increase muscle size in those areas.

"Accomplish as much as you can by doing as little as possible. Be lazy, yet efficient."
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