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SLIMMERKIWI's Photo SLIMMERKIWI SparkPoints: (329,760)
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12/30/19 6:31 P



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You're welcome emoticon

Kris

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MURRELLS's Photo MURRELLS Posts: 190
12/30/19 12:01 P

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Kris...Thank you for the info!

SLIMMERKIWI's Photo SLIMMERKIWI SparkPoints: (329,760)
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12/27/19 8:52 P



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@MURRELLS - go to your Nutrition Page and under "Tools & Settings" near the bottom of the page, click on "Edit Nutrition Goals" - near the bottom is "Meal Plan Settings". Check the "Low Sodium" box and remember to save your changes before you leave that page.

Hope that helps you,
Kris

Co-Moderator Dealing with Depression
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Team Leader Essential Tremors :-) (Benign and Familial) www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=30225


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I am not a Dr - please check with your qualified Health Professional for a diagnosis and treatment plan


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MURRELLS's Photo MURRELLS Posts: 190
12/27/19 12:24 P

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Megan...How do I set my mealplan to low sodium? Searched for it, but no answer. Thanks!

ZELDA13's Photo ZELDA13 SparkPoints: (98,991)
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7/8/19 1:25 A

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When you use SUMMERKIWI's link to the Mayo Clinic, also check out the DASH diet on their site. It encourages you to lower sodium in your diet which may then lower your blood pressure.

Alice

"I have not been placed on this earth to fit your mold or conform to what makes you feel more comfortable with my existence." Michelle Steinke

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ENGINEERMOM's Photo ENGINEERMOM Posts: 1,184
7/3/19 2:56 P

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My mom has high blood pressure, and has been eating a low-sodium diet for decades.

Her habits include:
1. Always buy no-salt-added canned items (beans, tomatoes, etc.)
2. Make everything you can from scratch so you control the amount of salt. She makes homemade turkey sausage, hummus, grilled chicken, taco seasoning, etc.
3. When dining out, choose items that allow you to control the salt - she stays away from all soups, and will usually order something like a salad with all the toppings on the side, or a pasta dish with the sauce on the side, or she'll ask for her chicken or whatever to be prepared with no salt, then salt it at the table.

Add acids to things to help add flavor without salt (lime/lemon juice, vinegars, wine, etc.)

Be aware that your tolerance for salt may be quite high, and food may taste quite bland until your tastebuds adjust. After a week or so, it should get better.

Take life one day at a time - enjoy today before you worry about tomorrow.


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WHITE-GREEN's Photo WHITE-GREEN Posts: 4,221
6/23/19 1:46 P

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I suggest you read Dr. Joel Fuhrman's book 'Eat to Live' or one of his other books. He also offers a lot of information online, and there is a team for Eat to Live here on Sparkpeople.



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SLIMMERKIWI's Photo SLIMMERKIWI SparkPoints: (329,760)
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6/16/19 5:31 A



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Below are some links which you may find helpful:

www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutri
tion-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/5-tas
ty-ways-to-to-tweak-recipes-for-health
ier-eating/art-20390066


www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/recip
es/heart-healthy-recipes/rcs-20077163


You will likely find that a significant weight-loss will also make a huge dent to your BP.

Good luck,
Kris

Co-Moderator Dealing with Depression
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=953


Team Leader Essential Tremors :-) (Benign and Familial) www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=30225


Co-Leader Crohn's Can't Stop Me
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=17464


I am not a Dr - please check with your qualified Health Professional for a diagnosis and treatment plan


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ARCHIMEDESII's Photo ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (227,551)
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6/15/19 4:49 P



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As an example of something delicious you can eat... pear, arugula salad. it has
slices of pear, arugula (or baby spinach/kale) and walnuts. You can also top with
a sprinkle of pomegranate seeds and a light dressing.



Oh and if you are watching your sodium/salt, you'll need to read the labels of your salad dressings very carefully. Some salad dressing can be high in salt. You may need to learn how to make your own. which IS very easy !

Learning to read nutrition labels will help you make more informed decisions about what processed foods you can eat and which you'll need to avoid. Canned soups are out. Frozen dinners. out. deli meats. out. it's not just the sodium, it's the sodium nitrates too.



ARCHIMEDESII's Photo ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (227,551)
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6/15/19 4:28 P



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CLPTHEBEREANS,

5 grams of salt would be a little more than a teaspoon.

Do you rely on processed foods for your meals ? Do you do any of your own cooking or do you eat out a lot ? If you eat at restaurants frequently, restaurant food is notoriously high in sodium, just like processed foods.

I know this may seem like a daunting task, but you'd be surprized how much wonderful food you can eat.

First, did your doctor recommend talking to a dietitian ? If not, ask for a referral. A good dietitian can help you created a balanced nutrition plan.

One thing you will need to is start planning and cooking your own meals. When you home cook, you control the amount of salt. And there are plenty of wonderful spices you can use to season your food instead of salt. turmeric, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, cayenne, cumin, etc. Think fresh herbs like rosemary, thyme or basil. Think garlic and green onions.

All those items are wonderful ways to flavor your meals.

What sort of foods do you eat now ? One simple thing you could do is starting eating more servings of fresh fruit and veggies. Fruit and veggies are loaded with FIBER. Fiber helps keep a person sated and full.

Just increasing the number of servings of fruit and veggies will help you be healthy, inside and out.


-JAMES-'s Photo -JAMES- Posts: 14,386
6/15/19 11:20 A

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URBANREDNEK,
thanks for the clarification on salt and sodium. Salt is sodium-chloride, NaCl, so 5 grams of salt has less than 5 grams of sodium, 1.938 as you wrote. So a slight conversion between the two.

The site that I pointed to has only sodium information. So indeed that ham page I pointed to on nutritiondata, for 100 grams of ham has 1304 mg of sodium (Na), and assuming its coming from salt, which is a very reasonable assumption, then 1304 * (5/1.938) = 3364 mg of salt, or 3.364 grams of salt.

I have to admit, as I was writing my previous post I did eat a slice of ham, and it tasted rather salty, and I thought only 1.304 grams? But it had 3.364 grams of salt.

No need to assume too many digits of accuracy, 3.4 grams of salt in 100 grams of ham.

James
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URBANREDNEK Posts: 12,583
6/15/19 9:53 A

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From your post, it looks like you might want to double-check the recommendation, and what is actually listed in the nutrition information for your local foods, since there is a difference between "salt" and "sodium". SALT (sodium chloride NaCl) is made up of both sodium and chloride, so the portion of "salt" in a food is going to be different from the portion of "sodium".

For North America, the daily recommendations for those with heart / blood pressure issues are:
No more than 1500 mg Sodium
No more than 3800 mg (3.8g) of Salt

Daily recommendations for other healthy adults are:
No more than 2300 mg Sodium
No more than 5900 mg (5.9g) of Salt

Our Nutrition Labels on foods list the Sodium content - not the "salt" content, and includes the naturally occurring sodium in the food, as well as any added salts.

The European recommendation that you are referring to is for no more than 5 g of SALT, which would be 1938 mg (1.938 g) of Sodium, along with medication, for those dealing with high blood pressure. The recommendation for healthy adults is no more than 8 g of salt for men (3100 mg of sodium) or 7 g of salt for women (2713 mg of sodium).

As for food choices, realistically all of your vegetables and fruits are great choices, and including legumes and whole grains will increase your fibre intake and make for more filling and satisfying meals. Choose breads made with whole grains and lower salt (talk to your local bakers to find ones who follow the guideline of no more than 1% salt per baked weight - so a baked 500g loaf will have no more than 5g of salt / 1938mg of sodium - which is considerably less than the 2% or more that is included in many commercial loaves). You will need to keep an eye on your intake of fish and seafood (some are naturally quite high in sodium, and packing / preserving methods add much more) to make sure that you are making low sodium choices, and curb your additions of salt when cooking and baking.

As you've noted, cheese, both soft and hard, is high is sodium, and you will find that you will have to limit your portions of these, and processed and cured meats and sausages will need to be severely limited or avoided.

Realistically, food choices low in sodium can taste quite bland and "off" for the first while when you make a drastic change in salt, so keeping a coarse grinder on hand for a very light application right before eating can help retain the flavour that you are used to while minimizing the actual amount. Using other spices and herbs for different flavours will definitely help, and you will find that your flavour preference will change over a few months to where you will be able to better enjoy flavours without the salt!

Looking forward to hearing that your next appointment shows a great improvement!

Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

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-JAMES-'s Photo -JAMES- Posts: 14,386
6/15/19 9:46 A

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Another place to go to get sodium information in all sorts of foods, both brand name and generic is the "nutritiondata" website:
Here is their ham information
nutritiondata.self.com/facts/sausages-and-
luncheon-meats/1345/2


You can set the serving size, and read off the mg (thousands of a gram) of sodium. For ham, if you set the serving size to 100 grams you can read off 1304 mg, a little over a gram of sodium.

The same for roast beef:
nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products
/7492/2

and the same serving size has only 54 mg of sodium.

Anyway, just another source of information on sodium.

James
Alberta, Canada


All time highest weight : 217 pounds

Starting weight : 195.0 pounds (June 7, 2012)
Final weight : 168.2 pounds (July 23, 2013)


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MLAN613 Posts: 23,919
6/15/19 7:42 A

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Wow...You have a challenge but it is definitely doable. Since you are dealing with some rather serious health problems, I would encourage you to ask your doctor for a referral to a Registered Dietitian (RD). A duly trained and licensed RD can help you develop a meal plan that meets your nutritional and medical goals. Any suggestions we make may cause further harm.

In the meantime, you can start tracking your nutrition here. You can set your meal plan to low sodium.

Exercise is also a piece in the healthy living game. Did your doctor clear for exercise? If not, you may want to call and ask if you can and what restrictions you have with your current condition.

Meghan in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA


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6/14/19 11:23 P

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Just found out from my Dr. that my high blood, caused by food with large sodium, has left my heart valves either thick (right side) slow in opening and closing valves causing blood to seep into the lungs. Then the Aorta is now getting hard.

The good news is this can be reversed! They put me on a dose of Blood Pressure meds. I'm supposed to lower my sodium levels. Now in Europe, they recommend 5 grams a day. I also need to start becoming more active with exercise.

I found out drinking coffee (more than 2 cups a day) can have a long term effect on blood pressure. Also, cottage cheese and cheeses are high enough to cause your blood pressure levels to rise. Processed foods, fast foods, packaged and chemically enhanced products also can throw your blood pressure off course.

Still trying to find which foods are available, healthy, and filling.
If you know of any that can help me, I would appreciate it. I have to go back to the Dr. in mid-August. There has to be a substantial improvement to be diverted from doing further damage to my heart, as well as keeping from having to take more medications.

With a concerned heart, clpthebereans

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